The American Bats of the Genera Myotis and Pizonyx

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1928 - 218 páginas
 

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Términos y frases comunes

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Página ii - Bulletins, the first of which was issued in 1875, consist of a series of separate publications comprising monographs of large zoological groups and other general systematic treatises (occasionally in several volumes), faunal works, reports of expeditions, catalogues of type-specimens, special collections, and other material of a similar nature.
Página 133 - The pertenacity with which they cling to certain feeding grounds, even when much molested, I saw strikingly illustrated on one occasion. The tide was rising and about to flood a muddy flat, of perhaps an acre in extent, where their favorite snails were in great quantities. Although six or eight gunners were stationed upon the spot, and kept up a continual round of tiring upon the poor birds, they continued to fly distractedly about over our heads, notwithstanding the numbers that every moment fell.
Página ii - ... special collections, and other material of similar nature. The majority of the volumes are octavo in size, but a quarto size has been adopted in a few instances in which large plates were regarded as indispensable. In the Bulletin series appear volumes under the heading Contributions from the United States National Herbarium, in octavo form, published by the National Museum since 1902, which contain papers relating to the botanical collections of the Museum.
Página 217 - But it was not as abundant in the latter part of the last century and in the beginning of this...
Página 198 - ... No such conditions appear to confront the winter sojourners of Hawaii. During its stay in the islands the plover, as also the turnstone, feeds chiefly in the upland pastures and clearings, up to 6,000 or 7,000 feet, and on newly-plowed cane land. Both the sugar planter and the stock raiser have much to thank the plover for, since, while the birds feed on small seeds to some extent, they live chiefly on insects, and according to Perkins, on insects of much economic importance, since they depend...
Página 99 - Yuma, in the collection of the Museum of Vertebrate Zoology, University of California.
Página 133 - During such flights the slaughter of these poor birds was appalling and almost unbelievable. Hunters would drive out from Omaha and shoot the birds without mercy until they had literally slaughtered a wagonload of them, the wagons being actually filled, and often with the sideboards on at that. Sometimes when the flight was unusually heavy and the hunters were well supplied with ammunition their wagons were too quickly and easily filled, so whole loads of the birds would be dumped on the prairie,...

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