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of Paris, and of his King, in their Service, against his nearest Relations, at the Head of an Army, through his Conduct, Victorious, and with Sword in Hand, at so extreme an Old-age, merits, methinks, to be recorded amongst the most remarkable Events of our Times : As

also the constant Goodness, Sweetness of BeAnd of M. De

haviour, and conscientious Facility of Monla Noue,

fieur De la Noue, in so great an Injustice of armed Parties, (the true School of Treason, Inhumanity, and Robbery) wherein he always kept up the Reputation of a great and experienced Captain. I have taken a Delight to publish, in several Places,

the Hopes I have of Mary de Gournay le Jars, And of Mary de Gournay.

my adopted · Daughter, and certainly beloved

by me with more than a paternal Love, and involved in my Solitude and Retirement, as one of the best Parts of my own Being. I have no Regard to any Thing in this World but her; and, if a Man may presage from her Youth, her Soul will, one Day, be capable of the noblest Things; and, amongst others, of the Perfection of the sacred Friendship, to which we do not read that any of her Sex could ever yet arrive ; the Sincerity and Solidity of her Manners are already sufficient for it; her Affection towards me is more than superabundant, and such, in short, as that there is nothing more to be wished, if not that the Apprehension she has of my End, being now Five and fifty Years old, might not so cruelly

afflict • As to the Meaning of these Words, Adopted Daughter, see the Are ticle Gournay in Bayle's Dictionary ; where you will find, that this young Lady's Opinion of the first Essays of Montaigne gave the Occasion for this Adoption, long before she ever saw Montaigne. But here I can't help tranfcribing Part of a Passage, which Mr, Bayle quoted from

M. Pasquier, in the Note X, which contains some remarkable Particulars of this sort of Adoption. Montaigne, says Pasquier, having, in 1588, made a long Stay at i Paris, Mademoiselle' de Jars came thither, on Purpose to see his

Person ; and she and her Mother carried him to their House at Gournay, where • he spent two Months in two or three Journeys, and met with as hearty a « Welcome as he could desire ; and, finally, that this virtuous Lady, being • informed of Montaigne's Death, crossed almost thro' the whole Kingdom • of France, with Passports, as well from her own Motive, as, by Invitation * from Montaigne's Widow and Daughter, to mix her 'Tears with theirs, whose Sorrows were boundless"

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afflict her. · The Judgment she made of my firit Essays, being a Woman fo young, and in this Age, and alone in her own Country, and the famous Vehemency wherewith The loved, and desired me upon the sole Efteem she had of me, before she ever saw me, is an Accident very worthy of Consideration.

Other Virtues have had little or no Credit in this Age, but Valour is become popular by our Civil Valour is beWars; and in this Respect we have Souls come popular in brave, even to Perfection, and in fo great

France. Number, that the Choice is impossible to be made. This is all of extraordinary, and not common, that has hitherto arrived at my Knowledge.

CH A P. XVIII.

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Of giving the L r E.
WE , This De-

LL, but some one will say to
sign of making a Man's Self the

Why Mon-
Subject of his Writing were excusable in taigne speaks

rare and famous Men, who, by their Re- so often of him'putation, had given others a Curiofity to fell in ihis • be fully informed of them. It is most true, I confefs it, and know very well, that Artificers will scarce lift their Eyes from their Work to look at an ordinary Man, when they will forfake their Workhouses and Shops to stare at an eminent Perfon, when he comes to Town: It misbecomes any person to give his own Character, except he has Qualities worthy of Imitation, and whose Life and Opinions may ferve for a Model. The great Actions of Cæfar and Xenophon were a just and folid Basis on which to fix and found their Narratives : And it were also to be wished, that we had the Journals of Alexander the Great, and the Commentaries that Augustus, Cato, Sylia, Brutus, and others have left of their Actions. We love and contemplate the very Statues of

such

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such Personages, both in Copper and Marble. This Remonstrance is very true, but it very little concerns me,

Non recita cuiquam, nifi amicis, idque rogatus ; Non ubivis, coramve quibuflibet : In medio qui Scripta foro recitant, sunt multi, quique lavantes.

i.e.
I seldom do rehearse, and when I do
*Tis to my Friends, and with Reluctance too,
Not before every one, and every-where ;
We have too many that Rehearsers are,

In Baths, the Forum, and the pụblic Square,
I do not here form a Statue to erect in the Centre of a
City, in the Church, or any public Quadrangle.

Non equidem boc studeo, bullatis ut mihi nugis
Pagina turgescat :
Secreti loquimur ,

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With pompous Trash to swell the frothy Line
Is not, indeed, my Friend! what I design :
Whatever be the Secrets I indite,

To you I trust, to you alone I write.
'Tis for some Corner of a Library, or to entertain a
Neighbour, a Kinsman, or a Friend, that has a mind to
renew his Acquaintance and Familiarity with me in this
my Picture. Others have been encouraged to speak of
themselves, because they found the Subject worthy and
sich ; I, on the contrary, am the bolder, by reason my
Subject is so poor and sterile, that I cannot be suspected
of Oftentation,
I judge freely of the Actions of others

j I give little of my own to judge of, because of their Nothingness: I am not so conscious of any Good in myself, as to tell it without Blushing, What Contentment would it be to me to hear any thus relate to me the Manners,

Faces, Hor. lib. i. Sat. 4. v. 73, &c. & Instead of coactus, as Horace has it in the first Verse, Montaigne has substituted rogatus, which more exactly expresses his Thought, Perf. Sat. v. v.

V: 19;

Faces, Countenances, the ordinary Words and Fortunes of my Ancestors ? How attentively should I listen to it! In Truth, it would be Ill-nature to despise even the Pictures of our Friends and Predecessors, the Fashion of their Cloaths, and of their Arms. I preserve my Father's Writings, his Seal, and one particular Sword of his, and have not thrown the long Staves he used to carry in his Hand, out of my Closet. Paterna vestis, et annulus, tanto chariòr est pofteris, quanto erga parentes major affeflus '. 'A • Father's Robe and Ring are so much the dearer to his

Posterity, in Proportion to the Affection they retain for • him.' If my Pofterity, nevertheless, shall be of another Mind, I shall be even with them ; for they cannot care less for me, than I shall then do for them. All the Traffic that I have, in this, with the Public, is, that I borrow their Writing Tackle, as it is more easy, and at Hand; and, in Recompence, shall, peradventure, keep a Dish of Butter from melting in the Market.

* Ne toga cordyllis, ne penula desit olivis, Et laxas Scombris fæpe dabo tunicas '.

i. e.

I'll furnish Plaice and Olives with a Coat,
And coyer Mack'rel when the Sun shines hot.

And though No-body should read me, have I loft my
Time in entertaining myself so many idle
Hours, in Thoughts so pleasing and useful ? Montaigne

talks so much In moulding this Figure upon myself, I have

of himself, that been so oft constrained to curry and turn he might the

better know myself, as it were, inside out, that the Copy is truly taken, and has, in some fort, formed himself and itself,' But, as I paint for others, I represent true Character, myself in more exquisite Colouring than in my own natural Complexion. I am as much formed by my Book, as my Book is by me: 'Tis a Book consubftantial with the Author ; of a peculiar Tenor ; a Member of my Life, and whose Business is not designed for

others,

i

k Mart, lib. xiii. Ep. 1, v. ds

Aug. de Civitate Dei, lib. ic. 13. ! Catullus, Ep. 92. v. 8,

of Paris, and of his King, in their Service, against his nearest Relations, at the Head of an Army, through his Conduct, Victorious, and with Sword in Hand, at so extreme an Old-age, merits, methinks, to be recorded amongst the most remarkable Events of our Times : As

also the constant Goodness, Sweetness of BeAnd of M. De haviour, and conscientious Facility of Monla Noue,

fieur De la Noue, in so great an Injustice of armed Parties, (the true School of Treason, Inhumanity, and Robbery) wherein he always kept up the Reputation of a great and experienced Captain. I have taken a Delight to publish, in several Places,

the Hopes i have of Mary de Gournay le Jars, And of Mary de Gournay.

my adopted Daughter, and certainly beloved

by me with more than a paternal Love, and involved in my Solitude and Retirement, as one of the best parts of my own Being. I have no Regard to any Thing in this World but her; and, if a Man may prefage from her Youth, her Soul will, one Day, be capable of the noblest Things ; and, amongst others, of the Perfection of the sacred Friendship, to which we do not read that any of her Sex could ever yet arrive ; the Sincerity and Solidity of her Manners are already sufficient for it ; her Affection towards me is more than superabundant, and such, in short, as that there is nothing more to be wished, if not that the Apprehension the has of my End, being now Five and fifty Years old, might not so cruelly

afflict • As to the Meaning of these Words, Adopted Daughter, see the Article Gournay in Bayle's Dictionary; where you will find, that this young Lady's Opinion of the first Essays of Montaigne gave the Occasion for this Adoption, long before she ever saw Montaigne. But here I can't help tranfcribing Part of a Paffage, which Mr. Bayle quoted from M. Pasquier, in the Note A, which contains some remarkable Particulars of thiş Sort of Adoption. Montaigne, says Pasquier, having, in 1588, made a long Stay at Paris, Mademoiselle de Jars came thither, on Purpose to see his Person ;

and she and her Mother carried him to their House at Gournay, where • he spent two Months in two or three Journeys, and met with as hearty a • Welcome as he could desire ; and, finally, that this virtuous Lady, being + informed of Montaigne's Death, crossed almost thro' the whole Kingdom • of France, with Passports, as well from her own Motive, as by Invitation * from Montaigne's Widow and Daughter, to mix her 'Tears with theirs, 6- whose Sorrows were boundlesse!

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