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'*. e.

Thy Superfluities do trouble thee,

And what I want, and pant for, troubles me.

Desire and Fruition do equally afflict us : The Rigours of Mistresses are disagreeable, but Facility, to say Truth, is more so; forasmuch as Discontent and Anger spring from the Esteem we have of the Thing desired; Love warms and stimulates, but Satiety begets Disgust j 'tis a blunt, dull, stupid, and fleepy Passion.

Si qua voles regnare diu, contemnat amantem:

cotttetnnite, amantes,

Sic hodic veniet, ft qua negavit heri e.'

i. e. :.,. V

The Lady that would keep her Servant still,
.If she be Wife, will sometimes give him Pain:
And the fame Policy with Men will do,
If they sometimes do slight their Misses too;
By which Means she that Yesterday said Nay,
Will pome and offer up herself To-day s.

Why did Poppea invent the Use of a Mask to hide her beautiful Face, but to enhance it to her Lovers? Why have they veiled, even below the Heels, those Beauties that every one desires to shew, and every one desires to fee? Why do they cover, with so many Hindrances, one over another, the Parts where our Desires, and their own, have their principal Seat? And to what End are those great hooped Bastions, with which our Ladies fortify their Haunches, but to allure our Appetite, and to draw us the nearer to them, by removing us the farther from them.

Et fugit adsaiiees, et fe citpit ante viderig.

i. e.

And to the Willows flies to be conceal'd,
Yet does desire to have her Flight reveal'd.

Interdum tunica duxit operta moram \

i. e.

c Ovid. Amor. lib. ii. El. 19. v. 33. f Propert. lib. ii. Eleg. 14.

v. 19, 20.' * Virg. Eclog. 3. v. 65. b Propert. lib. ii. Eleg. 13. v. 6.

The Greek Histories make Mention of the Agripplans', Neighbours to Scytbia, who live either without Rod or Stick to offend -, that not only £2fw no one attempts to attack them, but who- contentedly and ever can fly thither is safe, by reason of their focunty <udtbVirtue and Sanctity of Life, and no one is so yJ'lfiTM bold as there to lay Hands upon them -, and they have Applications made to them, to determine the Controversies that arise betwixt Men of other Countries. There is a certain Nation, where the Inclosures of Gardens and Fields, which they would preserve, is made only of a String of Cotton-yarn; and, so fenced, is more firm and secure than our Hedges and Ditches. m Furemjignatasolicitant: Aptrta effractarius præterit. Things sealed up, invite a Thief: House-breakers pass by open Doors.

Peradventure, the Facility of entering my House, amongst other Things, has been a Means to „ preserve it from the Violence of our Civil faj-e< inadeWars: Defence allures an Attempt, and De- fenceless House, fiance provokes an Attack. I enervated the during the CiSoldiers Design, by depriving the Exploit of Wa"' all Danger, and all Matter of Military Glory, which is wont to serve them for Pretence and Excuse. Whatever is done courageoufly, is ever done honourably, at a Time when the Laws are silent. I render the Conquest of my House cowardly and base to them; it is never shut to any one that knocks. My Gate has no other Guard tharr'a Porter, by ancient Custom and Ceremony; who does not so much serve to defend it, as to offer it with more Decency, and the better Grace. I have no other Guard or Centinel than the Stars. A Gentleman would be in the Wrong to make a Shew of Defence, if he be not really in a Condition to defend himself. He that lies open on one Side, is every-where so. Our Ancestors did not think of building Frontier Garrisons. The Methods of Assaulting, I mean, without Battery and Army, and of surprising our Houses, increase every Day above the Means to guard them. Mens Wits are generally sharp set that Way: Invasion every one is concerned in, none but the Rich in

Defence. 1 Herodot. lib. Iv. p. 263. ■ Senec. Ep. 68.

and by having our Zeal and Forces exercised by reason of this Opposition, I know not whether the Utility would not surmount the Damage.

We have thought to tie the Nuptial Knot more fast and Whether the firm, by having taken away all Means of Marriage Tie dissolving it •, but the Knot of the Will and "h "sJmfb, Affection ^ *° much the more slackened and 'tlking'aidy made loose, by how much that of Constraint the Meam of is drawn closer together: And, on the condissolving it. trary, that which kept the Marriages at Rome so long in Honour, and inviolate, was the Liberty every ©ne, that would, had to break them. They kept their Wives the better, because they might part with them if they would; and in the full Liberty of Divorces they lived fifty Years, and more, before any one made Use on't.

®uod licet, ingratutn est, quod non licet, acrius urit K

i. e.

What's free we are disgusted at, and flight j
What is forbidden whets the Appetite.

We might here introduce the Opinion of one of the Ancients, upon this Occasion, « That Executions rather whet * than dull the Edge of Vices: That they do not beget 'the Care of doing well, that being the Work of Reason « and Discipline, but only a Care not to be taken in do« ing ill.'

Latins exetfæ pestis contagia serpunt k.

i. e. The Plague-sore being laune'd, th' Infection spreads.

I do not know that this is true; but I experimentally know, that Civil Government never was, by that Means, reformed: The Order and Regulation of Manners depend upon some other Expedient.

The

*

; Ovid. Amor. lib. i. El. 19. v.,3. k Rutilias in Itinerario, life. i.

v. 397. 1

The Greek Histories make Mention of the Agrippians \ Neighbours to Scytbia, who live either without Rod or Stick to offend; that not only giJ no one attempts to attack them, but who- contentedly and ever can fly thither is safe, by reason of their securely withVirtue and Sanctity of Life, and no one is so J &>&* bold as there to lay Hands upon them; and they have Applications made to them, to determine the Controversies that arise betwixt Men of other Countries. There is a certain Nation, where the Inclosures of Gardens and Fields, which they would preserve, is made only of a String of Cotton-yarn; and, so fenced, is more firm and secure than our Hedges and Ditches. m Furemstgnata solicitant: Aperta effractarius præterit. Things sealed up, invite a Thief: House-breakers pass by open Doors.

Peradventure, the Facility of entering my House, amongst other Things, has been a Means to Montai ne preserve it from the Violence of our Civil j-a^ tFTdeWars: Defence allures an Attempt, and De- fenceUft House, fiance provokes an Attack. I enervated the during the dSoldiers Design, by depriving the Exploit of Wars' all Danger, and all Matter of Military Glory, which is wont to serve them for Pretence and Excuse. Whatever is done courageously, is ever done honourably, at a Time when the Laws are silent. I render the Conquest of my House cowardly and base to them •, it is never shut to any one that knocks. My Gate has no other Guard than"a Porter, by ancient Custom and Ceremony; who does not so much serve to defend it, as to offer it with more Decency, and the better Grace. I have no other Guard or Centinel than the Stars. A Gentleman would be in the Wrong to make a Shew of Defence, if he be not really in a Condition to defend himself. He that lies open on one Side, is every-where so. Our Ancestors did not think of building Frontier Garrisons. The Methods of Assaulting, I mean, without Battery and Army, and of surprising our Houses, increase every Day above the Means to guard them. Mens Wits are generally sharp set that Way: Invasion every one is concerned in, none but the Rich in

Defence. 1 Herodot. lib. iv. p. 263. ■ Senec. Ep. 68.

Defence. Mine was strong for the Time whefein it was built; I have added nothing to it of that kind, and should fear lest its Strength would turn against myself; besides which, we are to consider, that a peaceable Time would require it to be dismantled. There is Danger never to be able to regain it, and it would be very hard to secure it: For, in intestine Commotions, your Man may be of the Party you fear; and where Religion is the Pretext, even a Man's nearest Relation becomes faithless with a Colour of Justice. The public Exchequer will not maintain our domestic Garrisons; they would exhaust it: We ourselves have not wherewithal to do it without our Ruin, or, which is more inconvenient and injurious, without ruining the People: As to the rest, you thereby lose all, and even your Friends will be ready to accuse your Want of Vigilancy, and your Improvidence, than to pity you, as well as to blame your Ignorance or Lukewarmness in the Duties of your Profession. That so many garrisoned Houses have been lost, whereas this of mine remains, makes me apt to believe, that they were only lost, by being guarded: This gives an Enemy both a strong Inclination and Colour of Reason: All Watching and Warding shews a Face of War. Let who will come to me in God's Name, but I shall not invite them: 'Tis the Retirement I have chosen for my Repose from War: I endeavour to sequester this Corner from the public Tempest, as I also do another Corner in my Soul. Our War may put on what Forms it will, multiply and diversify itself into new Parties; for my own Part I shall not budge. Amongst so many garrisoned Houses, I am the only Person, of my Condition, that I know of, who have purely intrusted mine to the Protection of Heaven, without removing either Plate, Deeds, or Hangings. I will neither fear, nor save myself by halves: If a full Acknowledgment ean acquire the Divine Favour, it will continue with me to the End: If not, I have staid long enough, to render my Continuance remarkable, and fit to be recorded: How? Why, I have lived there thirty Years.

'CHAP.

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