Life of Galileo Galilei: With Illustrations of the Advancement of Experimental Philosophy

Portada
W. Hyde, 1832 - 307 páginas

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Contenido

I
13
III
20
V
30
VII
43
IX
55
XI
67
XIII
84
XIV
104
XVII
142
XIX
158
XXI
167
XXII
196
XXIII
222
XXIV
232
XXVI
248
XXVII
274

XV
114
XVI
123
XXVIII
291

Términos y frases comunes

Pasajes populares

Página 18 - For my name and memory, I leave it to men's charitable speeches, and to foreign nations, and to the next age.
Página 93 - Professor of Philosophy, whom I have repeatedly and urgently requested to look at the moon and planets through my glass, which he pertinaciously refuses to do. Why are you not here ? What shouts of laughter we should have at this glorious folly, and to hear the Professor of Philosophy at Pisa laboring before the Grand Duke, with logical arguments, as if with magical incantations, to charm the new planets out of the sky.
Página 180 - The proposition that the sun is in the centre of the world and immovable from its place is absurd, philosophically false, and formally heretical; because it is expressly contrary to the Holy Scriptures.
Página 226 - Alas ! your dear friend and servant Galileo has become totally and irreparably blind ; so that this heaven, this earth, this universe, which with wonderful observations I had enlarged a hundred and thousand times beyond the belief of by-gone ages, henceforward for me is shrunk into the narrow space which I myself fill in it. — So it pleases God : it shall therefore please me also.
Página 163 - ... when the living creature is removed all these qualities are carried off and annihilated ; although we have imposed particular names upon them (different from those other and real accidents), and would fain persuade ourselves that they truly and in fact exist.
Página 92 - There are seven windows in the head — two nostrils, two eyes, two ears, and a mouth; so in the heavens there are two favorable stars, two unpropitious, two luminaries, and Mercury alone undecided and indifferent. From which and many other similar phenomena of nature, such as the seven metals, etc., which it were tedious to enumerate, we gather that the number of planets is necessarily seven.
Página 73 - But physicall figurations are farre more strange : for by that may be framed perspects and lookingglasses, that one thing shall appeare to be many, as one man shall appeare to be a whole army, and one sunne or moone shall seem divers. Also perspects may be so framed, that things farre off shall seem most nigh unto us...
Página 165 - We find in him not only literary distinction, but also the love of piety, and he is strong in those qualities by which Pontifical good-will is easily obtained. And now, when he has been brought to this city, to congratulate Us on Our elevation, We have...
Página 145 - Copernicus and others, and leave the condemning of them as erroneous and heretical to whom it belongeth ; yet let them not. hope to find such rash and precipitous determinations in the wary and holy fathers, or in the absolute wisdom of him who cannot err, as those into which they suffer themselves to be hurried by some particular affection or interest of their own. In these and such other positions, which are not directly articles of faith, certainly no man doubts but His Holiness hath always an...
Página 54 - Copernicus,* and by that theory have succeeded in fully explaining many phenomena, which on the contrary hypothesis are altogether inexplicable. I have arranged many arguments and confutations of the opposite opinions, which however I have not yet dared to publish, fearing the fate of our master Copernicus, who, although he has earned immortal fame among a few, yet by an infinite number (for so only can the number of fools be measured) is exploded and derided.

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