The Odyssey of Homer, Volumen6

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I
7
II
49
III
91
IV
125
V
193
VI
195
VII
201
VIII
207

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Página 84 - And they shall destroy the walls of Tyrus, and break down her towers: I will also scrape her dust from her, and make her like the top of a rock. It shall be a place for the spreading of nets in the midst of the sea: for I have spoken it, saith the Lord God: and it shall become a spoil to the nations.
Página 167 - ... innumerable images of nature. But Homer, like the Ocean, is always great, even when he ebbs and retires ; even when he is lowest, and loses himself most in Narrations and incredible Fictions : as instances of this, we cannot forget the descriptions of tempests, the adventures of Ulysses with the Cyclops, and many others.
Página 173 - The question is how far a poet, in pursuing the description or image of an action, can attach himself to little circumstances without vulgarity or trifling. What particulars are proper and enliven the image? Or what are impertinent and clog it? In this matter painting is to be consulted, and the whole regard had to those circumstances which contribute to form a full, and yet not a confused, idea of the thing.
Página 196 - scape thy due, perfidious king ! Pursu'd by vengeance on the swiftest wing : At land thy strength could never equal mine, At sea to conquer, and by craft, was thine. But heaven has gods, and gods have searching eyes : Ye mice, ye mice, my great avengers, rise!
Página 177 - It must be allowed that there is a majesty and harmony in the Greek language, which greatly contribute to elevate and support the narration. But I must also observe, that this is an advantage grown upon the language since Homer's time ; for things are removed from vulgarity by being out of use ; and if the words we could find in any present language were equally sonorous or musical in themselves, they would still appear less poetical and uncommon than those of a dead one, from this only circumstance,...
Página 85 - If I rejoiced at the destruction of him that hated me, Or lifted up myself when evil found him : Neither have I suffered my mouth to sin By wishing a curse to his soul.
Página 67 - These (every table cleans'd, and every throne, And all the melancholy labour done) Drive to yon court, without the palace wall, There the revenging sword shall smite them all ; So with the suitors let them mix in dust, Stretch'd in a long oblivion of their lust.
Página 169 - ... composure in the one, and all the warmth, hurry, and tumult in the other, which the subject of either required: both of them had been imperfect, if they had not been as they are. And let the painter or poet be young or old, who designs...
Página 62 - A deed like this thy future fame would wrong : For dear to gods and men is sacred song.
Página 182 - An indifferent translation may be of some use, and a good one will be of a great deal. But I think that no translation ought to be the ground of criticism, because no man ought to be condemned upon another man's explanation of his meaning...

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