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Year by year, in beauty, yonder cherry root | The Payspring Bible Class. Sheds the bursting blossom, blade, and vernal shoot;

QUESTIONS ON MATTHEW'S GOSPEL. But some link a-lacking, in the hidden chain,

Chapter VI. Mars the mellow. fruitage, and the show is What motive for giving alms are we here vain.

warned against ? Why should we rather bide our almsgiving

from our fellowmen? Fair cherry blossoms, ye have much akin

What kind of prayers are we warned to avoid ?

Why does Jesus bid us enter into our closets To the spirit-produce spoiled by latent sin:

when we pray? Year by year the soul-flower sheds her Why do the heathen use vain repetitions when

they pray? blossoms so,

Why ought we not to do so ? Long before the harvest lost the vernal What model form of prayer has Jesus given us? glow.

What reason why we should forgive those who

injure us is annexed to this prayer?

What promise concerning the reward of the Pale cherry blossoms, deem we thus in vain

humble and sincere is given three times in

this chapter ? All your shining splendour, nought of solid Why are we forbidden to lay up treasures on gain;

earth? They who fail to fathom nature's mystic plan,

Why are we commanded to lay up treasures in

heaven? More the spirit kingdom carefully should What figure is used to describe the blessedness

of those who have a single eye to God's

glory?

What two masters can no one serve ? Pure spirit blossoms, when the light is seen,

About what things are we forbidden to be over

anxious ? Something sweet may linger, where your buds

What does Jesus bid us learn from beholding have been.

the fowls of the air? In the heavenly gardens, to our soul's surprise,

What does He bid us learn from the beauty of

the lilies? From evanished blossoms, lasting fruit may | What three questions here put include a

worldly anxieties? Why should not God's children be anxious

about these things ? Fair human blossoms, folded in the dust, What is the one thing we should seek first? Fading in the spring time, full of hope and What shall those who do so have besides ?

How many times in this chapter is God called trust,

our Father? Fairy form and feature, marred by scarce a

(These are not Prize Questions ; but intended solely to stain,

encourage the study of the Scriptures at home.] Shall & finite creature deem your purpose vain ?

Prize Scripture Acrostics and Questions.

Competitors will please observe to address their Bright human blossoms, beautiful to see,

answers now to Reu. JOHN KAY, Edinburgh. In the 'many mansions,' where the ransomed

7 What king lost the final victory over his Shielded from the rough wind, and the blight enemy by carelessness ? ing frost,

8 Where, in one verse, are five kinds of

actions described as having been unprofitable Fairer clusters ripen, than our love hath

for want of God's blessing ? lost.

9 Where is one nation severely rebuked for J. K. MUIR. I rejoicing in the distress of another?

rise.

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2 When shall those who fill our native land,

In the cause of temp'rance boldly stand ?
When shall union dwell in every breast,

Making all supremely blest?.
3 When shall hostile nations war no more?

When their bitter thoughts of strife be o'er?
When shall every note discordant cease,

In the quiet song of peace ?
4 When shall love to all, so pure and free,

Teach us how to treat the wrongs we see;
Joining heart and hand, the true and brave,
Every sorrowing one to save ?

(From

Temperance Lyrios for the Young,' Price 2d.-J. & R. Parlane, Faisley.)

Paisley: J. AND R. PARLANE.]

(London: HOULSTON AND SONS.

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THE FIRE AND THE HAMMER.

A SUMMER HOLIDAY.

THE DAYSPRING' PICTURE GALLERY. L OW pleasant it is to spend a long

VII.--THE FIRE AND THE HAMMER. summer day by the sea-shore! The THE next picture introduces us to a very promised excursion is looked forward to 1 busy scene. On one side are large with delight for days or perhaps for weeks smelting furnaces, with leaping, roaring before. When at length the looked-for flames, out of the heart of which you see day comes, all are ready betimes--no fear streams of molten metal flowing into moulds of sleeping too long that morning.

prepared for the purpose. On the other What a disappointment when one of the side are a number of masons, hewing and little ones is prevented by sickness from dressing stones, or polishing blocks of joining the merry band; but even the sick marble and porphyry. Every one is busy, one is cheered by promise of shells, sea either in feeding and tending the huge weeds, and other pretty things on their furnaces, and directing the waves of purified return; and we hope these promises will metal which they send forth, or in hambe fulfilled. We should always remember mering and chiselling the stones, some of those who are sick or in any trouble.

which are massive pillars and corner-stones, Suppose we join a holiday party, and and some of them ornamental facings, or proceed with them to the sea-coast. When capitals of delicate tracery. We see here we arrive there we find that we have five such a scene as was familiar in the land of hours to spend before we must be at the Israel about 2800 years ago. There were station to return home. How shall we thousands of workmen employed at that make the most of these five hours? It is time through the length and breadth of a fine thing to make the most of our time. the land,-masons, carpenters, sculptors, Could we remember this every day, how smiths, iron and brass founders; each much good it would do us. We all wish following his own trade, and all working to get as much enjoyment as possible on for one object. If you had asked one of this holiday. The little ones wish to these men what he was about, he would gather shells—some of the older ones to have told you that the king was going to collect sea-weeds—and the boys would build a magnificent temple in the city of think the day almost lost if they did not Jerusalem, and that it had been decreed get a sail.

that all the materials were to be brought to A rowing boat is near, and, the weather the spot ready for use. That was why the being favourable, it is hired, and soon our air, in many parts of the land, was filled party are sailing along. Looking into the with the ring of the axe, and the heavy water we see so much to admire so many thud of the hammer, and with the roar of kinds of sea-weeds, curious stones, bits of the surging flames of the blast furnace, and coral, shells, and fishes swimming about in the tread of many feet, and hum of many the water, that we gaze on them with voices. Every hour's work was doing wonder and delight. We cannot but something to hasten the erection of the remember the words—0 Lord, how | stately building which would soon be the manifold are thy works! in wisdom hast I glory of the land of Israel. thou made them all: the earth is full of Do you know why this picture hangs in thy riches. So is this great and wide sea, our gallery? It is because our God is wherein are things creeping innumerable, about to build for Himself a more glorious both small and great beasts.

temple than Solomon's; and now He is We find five hours far too short a time preparing the materials for it all up and for all we had intended to do; but if we down our world. They seem unlikely carry home with us a deepened sense of the enough for the purpose; for they are sinful manifold display of the wisdom and power men and women and children, with hard of God in his works, our holiday will have hearts and unholy lives. But there is a done us great good.

| wonderful instrument at work among them,

THE FIRE AND THE HAMMER.

breaking down and melting, purifying,
moulding, and adorning; and that instru-
ient is the Word of the Lord. Look at
the text over the frame of this picture :
• Is not My word like as a fire ? ? saith the
Lord; and like a hammer that breaketh
the rock in pieces ?'

man may take a bar of iron, and lay it on an anvil, and hammer it till his arms ache, without any effect. He must thrust it into the heart of a furnace, and it will come out ready to obey his will. Again, if you take stones of a certain kind, and throw them into a blazing fire, instead of becoming

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The last picture showed us how precious | pliable, they will get harder and harder. God's word is; this one shows us how | For them you must use a hammer; and powerful it is. And notice that the fire and the blows which rebounded uselessly from the hammer represent power of different the cold iron, will split and shape the rock. kinds, or at least applied to different Human hearts are very different from each substances in different ways. A strong other, though all alike are hard and cold

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