The Works of the English Poets: With Prefaces, Biographical and Critical, Volumen32,Página 1

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Página 79 - HAPPY the man whose wish and care A few paternal acres bound, Content to breathe his native air, In his own ground ; Whose herds with milk, whose fields with bread, Whose flocks supply him with attire ; Whose trees in Summer yield him shade, In Winter fire.
Página 98 - Jove Now burns with glory, and then melts with love; Now his fierce eyes with sparkling fury glow, Now sighs steal out, and tears begin to flow: Persians and Greeks like turns of nature found.
Página 124 - And decks the goddess with the glittering spoil. This casket India's glowing gems unlocks, And all Arabia breathes from yonder box. The tortoise here and elephant unite, Transform'd to combs, the speckled and the white.
Página 138 - Here living tea-pots stand, one arm held out, One bent ; the handle this, and that the spout...
Página 111 - And bless their Critic with a Poet's fire. An ardent Judge, who zealous in his trust, With warmth gives sentence, yet is always just ; Whose own example strengthens all his laws ; And is himself that great Sublime he draws.
Página 80 - The world recedes; it disappears! Heaven opens on my eyes; my ears With sounds seraphic ring! Lend, lend your wings! I mount! I fly! O Grave! where is thy victory? O Death! where is thy sting?
Página 101 - Which lives as long as fools are pleas'd to laugh. Some valuing those of their own side or mind, Still make themselves the measure of mankind : Fondly we think we honour merit then, When we but praise ourselves in other men.
Página 44 - Be smooth, ye rocks ! ye rapid floods, give way ! The Saviour comes ! by ancient bards foretold : Hear him, ye deaf! and all ye blind, behold! He from thick films shall purge the visual ray, And on the sightless eyeball pour the day : 'Tis he th' obstructed paths of sound shall clear And bid new music charm th' unfolding ear: The dumb shall sing, the lame his crutch forego, And leap exulting like the bounding roe.
Página 47 - See a long race thy spacious courts adorn ; See future sons, and daughters yet unborn, In crowding ranks on every side arise, Demanding life, impatient for the skies ! See barbarous nations at thy gates attend, Walk in thy light, and in thy temple bend...
Página 88 - Itself unseen, but in th' effects remains. Some, to whom Heav'n in wit has been profuse, Want as much more, to turn it to its use ; For wit and judgment often are at strife, Tho' meant each other's aid, like man and wife.

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