Elements of Mental Philosophy, Embracing the Two Departments of the Intellect and the Sensibilities, Volumen2

Portada
Harper & brothers., 1845
 

Comentarios de la gente - Escribir un comentario

No encontramos ningún comentario en los lugares habituales.

Páginas seleccionadas

Contenido

Further instances of the original beauty of sounds
58
Associated beauty implies an antecedent or intrinsic beauty
64
Of fitness considered as an element of associated beauty
70
Connexion between beauty and sublimity
78
Indications of power accompanied by emotions of the sublime
84
Definition of taste and some of its characteristics
91
Of the process involved in the formation of taste
93
Instantancousness of the decisions of taste
94
Of the permanency of beauty
95
Emotions of the Ludicrous 74 General nature of emotions of the ludicrous 75 Occasions of emotions of the ludicrous
97
Of Hobbess account of the ludicrous 77 Of what is to be understood by wit 78 Of wit as it consists in burlesque or in debasing objects
99
Of wit when employed in aggrandizing objects
101
Of other methods of exciting einotions of the ludicrous 81 Of the character and occasions of humour
102
Of the practical utility of feelings of the ludicrous
103
INstANces of other simple EMotions 83 Emotions of cheerfulness joy and gladness 84 Emotions of melancholy sorrow and grief
104
Emotions of surprise astonishment and wonder
105
Emotions of dissatisfaction displeasure and disgust
106
Emotions of diffidence modesty and shame
107
Emotions of regard reverence and adoration
108
nATURAL OR PATHEMATIC SENSIBILITIES natural or PATHEMATIC SENTiments CLASS SECOND The Desires
109
NATURE of Desires Section 89 Of the prevalence of desire in this department of the mind 90 The nature of desires known from consciousness
111
Of the place of desires in relation to other mental states
112
Of an exception to the foregoing statement
113
Desires always imply an object desired
115
The fulfilment of desires attended with enjoyment 96 Of variations or degrees in the strength of the desires
116
Tendency to excite movement an attribute of desire
117
Classification of this part of the sensibilities
118
The principles based upon desire susceptible of a twofold opera
119
tion CHAP II 1Nsti Ncts 101
120
104
125
105
126
107
127
108
128
Of occasionai desires for action and repose
129
Of the twofold operation and inorality of the appetites
130
111
131
113
132
Of curiosity or the desire of knowledge
133
The desires characterized by comparative ſixedness and perma 114
134
116
136
117
137
Of the nature of the instincts of brute animals 102 Instincts susceptible of slight modifications 103 Instances of instincts in the human mind 104 Fu...
138
119
140
Emulation resolvable into the principle of imitativeness
141
Of the natural desire of esteem
143
Of the desire of esteem as a rule of conduct
145
Of acquisitiveness or the desire of possession
146
Of perversions of the possessory desire
148
Facts in proof of the natural desire of power
149
Of the moral character of the desire of power
150
Veracity or the propensity to utter the truth
151
Of the twofold action of the p opensity to truth
152
13 Propensity of self love or the desire of happiness
153
Of selfishness as distinguished from self love
154
Modifications of selfishness pride vanity and arrogance
155
Reference to the opinions of philosophical writers
156
The principle of sociality original in the human mind
157
The principle of sociality not selfish
158
Reference to the ºoctrine of Hºbbes on this subject 133 Remarks on the state ents of the preceding section 139 The doctrine of an original principle of...
160
The existence of the principle shown from the conduct of chil 142 The same shown from the facts of later lºſe dren and youth
162
The social principle exists in the enemies of society
164
Pi Yoſs of the natural desire of society from the confessions and 145 Further proos and illustrations of the natural origin of the prin conduct of those ...
165
Other illustrations of a similar kind ciple of sociality
166
ºther instances in illustration of the same subject
169
14 The subject illustrated from experiments in prison discipline
170
Relation of the social principle to civil society
172
Of the form of desire denominated hope
173
the MALEvolent affections 13 i Of the comparative rank of the affections
174
Of the complex nature of the affections
175
Of resentinent or anger
176
Uses and moral character of instinctive resentment
177
Of voluntary in distinction from instinctive resentment
178
Tendency of anger to excess and the natural checks to it
179
Other reasons for checking and subduing the angry passions
180
Modifications of resentment Peevlshness
182
Modifications of resentment Envy
183
Modifications of resentinent Revenge
185
Nature of the passion of fear
186
Of the inoral character of the domestic affections and of the be nevolent affections generally
198
Of the connexion between benevolence and rectitude
200
Of humanity or the love of the human race
202
Further proofs in support of the doctrine of an innate humanity or love for the human race
203
Proofs of a humane or philanthropic principle from the existence of benevolent institutions
205
Other remarks in proof of the same doctrine
207
81 Onjection from the contests and wars among mankind
209
The objection drawn from wars further considered
211
Illustration of the statements of the foregoing section
212
Of patriotism or love of country
213
Of the affection of friendship
214
Of the affection of pity or sympathy
216
Of the moral character of pity
217
Of the affection of gratitude
218
Man created originally with the principle of love to God
220
That man was originally created with a principle of love to God
221
Further proofs that man was thus created
223
Illustration of the results of the principle of love to God from the character and life of the Saviour
225
The absence of this principle attended with an excessive and sin ful action of other principles
226
Further illustrations of the results of the absence of this principle
228
Views of President Edwards on the subject of human depravity
230
General remarks on the nature of habit
232
Objection to these views in respect to habit
238
THE MORAL SENSIBILITIES OR CONSCIENCE
245
Proofs of a moral nature from the terms used in different languages
251
Evidences of a moral nature even among Savage mations
258
Classification of the moral sensibilities
264
Of thºs ground or basis of moral approbation and disappro at lon
271
Of the doctrine which confounds reasoning and conscience
272
Of the close connexion between conscience and reasoning
273
Illustration of the preceding section
274
Further illustrations of the same subject
275
Remarks upon the case stated in the foregoing section
276
Of the training or education of the conscience
277
Of guilt when a person acts conscientiously
278
Illustrations of the statements of the preceding section from the case of the Apostle Paul
279
Nature of Moral BEAUTY 238 Of the origin of emotions of moral beauty
280
Of the origin and import of the phrase moral deformity
281
Of the correspondence between the degrees of moral beauty and the quickness or liveliness of the moral sensibilities
282
Of the perception of moral beauty considered as a source of hap piness
283
Of the moral beauty of the character of the Supreme Being
284
Chap W Nature of MoRAL sublimity 243 Remarks in explanation of the moral sublime
286
Instances and of the moral sublime
287
The moral sublime involves the morally beautiful
288
A degree of moral sublime in acts of strict and undeviating integ rity or justice
289
Other instances of the sublimity of justice 248 Instances of friendship and the parental affection illustrative of the subject
290
Of the moral sublimity of great benevolent undertakings
292
The spirit of forgiveness in some cases sublime
293
The MORAL SENSIBILITIES OR CONSCIENCE MoRAL or conscienTIOUS SENTIMENTs
295
Existence of obligatory FEELINGs section 251 Feelings of moral obligation distinct from feelings of moral ap proval and disapproval 252 Proof ...
297
Further proof from the conduct of men
298
Further proof from language and literature
299
Further proof from the necessity of these feelings
300
NATURE of obligatory FEELINGs 256 Feelings of obligation simple and not susceptible of definition
302
Of their authoritative and enforcing nature
303
Feelings of obligation differ from those of mere approval and dis approval
304
Feelings of obligation have particular reference to the future
305
Feelings of obligation differ from desires
306
Of diversities in moral judgment in connexion with differences
313
274
318
275
319
Of the existence of a moral nature in connexion with public rob
325
Of the origin of the ideas or abstract conceptions of right and wrong
331
The immutability of moral distinctions shown secondly from
337
91 Shown in the fifth place from the deportment and conduct
344
Of the proofs of this doctrine from the appeals which are made
351
Of the discouragements attending a process of moral instruction
357
Further views on the influence of moral habits
363
section
369
Disordered action of imitativeness or the principle of imitation
376
Of sympathetic imitation and what is involved in it
382
Other instances of this species of imitation
388
section Page
392
Disordered action of the passion of fear
399
Of moral accountability in cases of natural or congenital moral
406
Casual association in connexion with objects and places
413
oral signs or speech
431
characteristics or Languages
457

Otras ediciones - Ver todas

Términos y frases comunes

Pasajes populares

Página 98 - I may therefore conclude, that the passion of laughter is nothing else but sudden glory arising from some sudden conception of some eminency in ourselves, by comparison with the infirmity of others, or with our own formerly...
Página 83 - The voice of the Lord is upon the waters: the God of glory thundereth: the Lord is upon many waters.
Página 263 - For when the Gentiles, which have not the law, do by nature the things contained in the law, these, having not the law, are a law unto themselves ; which show the work of the law written in their hearts, their conscience also bearing witness, and their thoughts the mean while accusing or else excusing one another ;) in the day when God shall judge the secrets of men by Jesus Christ, according to my Gospel.
Página 82 - tis, to cast one's eyes so low! The crows and choughs, that wing the midway air, Show scarce so gross as beetles : Half way down Hangs one that gathers samphire; dreadful trade! Methinks, he seems no bigger than his head: The fishermen, that walk upon the beach, Appear like mice; and yon...
Página 89 - AND I saw another mighty angel come down from heaven, clothed with a cloud : and a rainbow was upon his head, and his face was as it were the sun, and his feet as pillars of fire...
Página 351 - O my people, what have I done unto thee? and wherein have I wearied thee? - testify against me.
Página 100 - The sun had long since in the lap Of Thetis taken out his nap, And like a lobster boiled, the morn From black to red began to turn," The imagination modifies images, and gives unity to variety ; it sees all things in one, il piti nelV uno.
Página 83 - There went up a smoke out of his nostrils, and fire out of his mouth devoured : coals were kindled by it. He bowed the heavens also, and came down : and darkness was under his feet. And he rode upon a cherub, and did fly : yea, he did fly upon the wings of the wind.
Página 285 - The sun shall be no more thy light by day, neither for brightness shall the moon give light unto thee; but the Lord shall be unto thee an everlasting light, and thy God thy glory. Thy sun shall no more go down, neither shall thy moon withdraw itself: for the Lord shall be thine everlasting light, and the days of thy mourning shall be ended.
Página 285 - The Sun of Righteousness has been gradually drawing nearer and nearer, appearing larger and brighter as He approached, and now He fills the whole hemisphere, pouring forth a flood of glory, in which I seem to float like an insect in the beams of the sun ; exulting, yet almost trembling, while I gaze on this excessive brightness, and wondering, with unutterable wonder, vrhy God should deign thus to shine upon a sinful worm.

Información bibliográfica