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ESSAY O N H IS LIFE AND G E NIUS,

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sold By collins & HANNAY, NEW-YORK; CARTER, HENDEE & Co., BOSTON;
DESILVER, JR. & THOMAS, PHILADELPHIA ; AND EDWARD
J. COALE & CO., BALTIMORE.

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CHEYNEl . . . . . . . . . . . . . 351
Cave . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 356
KING of PRUssrA . . . . . . . . . . 358
BkowNE . . . . . . . . . . . . 370
Asch AM . . . . . . . . . . . . 379
POLITICAL TRACTS.
Marmor Norfolciense; or, an Essay on an
ancient Prophetical Inscription in Monkish
Rhyme, lately discovered near Lynn . 385
Observations on the State of Affairs in 1756 . 392
An Introduction to the Political State of Great
Britain 395

Observations on the Treaty between his Britannic Majesty and his Imperial Majesty of all the Russias . . . . . . . . . . . 401 Introduction to the Proceedings of the Committee appointed to manage the Contributions for Clothing French Prisoners of War, . . 403 On the Bravery of the English Common Soldiers . . . . . . . . . . . . 403 The False Alarm, 1770 . . . . . . . . 404 Tho on the late Transactions respecting alkland's Islands, 1771 . . . . . . . The Patriot: addressed to the Electors of Great

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English Dictionary . . . . . . . 4 Preface to the octavo Edition of the English

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Dictionary . . . . . . . . . . 455 Miscellaneous Observations on the Tragedy of Macbeth, with Remarks on Sir T. Hanmer's Edition of Shakspeare . . . . . . . 456 Proposals for Printing the Dramatic Works of William Shakspeare . . . . . . 467 Preface to Shakspeare . . . . . . . . . . . . 469 General Observations on the Plays of Shakspeare . . . . . . . . . . . . 485 An Account of the Harleian Library . . . . . 492 Preface to the Catalogue of the Harleian Library . . . . . . . . . . . 495 An Essay on the Origin and Importance of Small Tracts and Fugitive Pieces, written for the Introduction of the Harleian Miscellany . . . . . . . . 496

PAGE.

A view of the Controversy between Monsieur

Crousaz and Mr. Warburton on the subject

of Mr. Pope's Essay on Man. . . 499

Preliminary Discourse to the London Chronicle 500

Introduction to the “World Displayed" . . . . 501

Preface to the “Preceptor: containing a General

Plan of Education” - . 508

Rolt's Dictionary . . . . . . . . . 513

the Translation of Father Lobo's

Voyage to Abyssinia. . - . 515

An Essay on Epitaphs - - - - - . 517

Preface to “An Essay on Milton’s use and imi-
tation of the Moderns in his Paradise Lost" 519
Letter to the Rev. Mr. Douglas, occasioned b
his Vindication of Milton, &c. By Wil-
liam Lauder, A. M. . . . . . . . . 521
Testimonies concerning Mr. Lauder . . . . 523
An Account of an Attempt to ascertain the
Longitude . . . . . . . . . . . 528
Considerations on the Plans offered for the
Construction of Blackfriars Bridge . . . 531

Some Thoughts on Agriculture, both Ancient

and Modern ; with an Account of the

Page.

Du Halde's History of China . . . . . . . 590

Account of the Conduct of the Dutchess of

Marlborough . . . . . . . . . . . 59

Memoirs of the Court of Augustus, by Thomas

Blackwell, J. U. D. . . . . . . . . 592

Four Letters from Sir I. Newton to Dr. Bentley 595
Journal of Eight Days' Journey from #.

to Kingston upon Thames, &c. To which
is added, An o on Tea. By Mr. Ho 596
Reply to a paper in the Gazetteer, May 26, 1757 599
Essay on the Writings and Genius of Pope .. 601
A Free Enquiry into the Nature and Origin of
Evil . . . . . . . . . . . . . 604
History of the Royal Society of London, by
Thomas Birch, D. D. . . . . . . . 613
The General History of Polybius, translated by
Mr. Hampton . . . . . . . . . 613
Miscellanies on Moral and Religious Subjects,
by Elizabeth Harrison . . . . . . 614

Historical and Critical Enquiry into Dr. Tytler's

“Evidence produced by the Earls of Moray
and Morton against Mary Queen of Scots” 614

St. Andrew's . . . . . . . . . . . . 618

A complete Windication of the Licensers of the Aberbrothic . . . . . . . . . . . . 619

Stage from the malicious and scandalous Montrose . . . . . . . . . . . . . 620

Aspersions of Mr. Brooke . . . . . . 539 || Aberdeen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 621

Preface to the Gentleman's Magazine, 1738 . 544 | Slanes Castle. The Buller of Buchan . . . 622

An Appeal to the Public. From the Gentleman's Bamff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 623

Magazine, March, 1739 . . . . . . . 545 | Elgin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ib.

Considerations on the Case of Dr. T(rapp)'s Fores. Calder. Fort George . . . . . . 624

Sermons abridged by Mr. Cave - - - Inverness . . . . . . . . . . . . . ib.

Letter on Fire-works . . . . . . . . . 549 || Lough Ness . . . . . . . . . . . . 625

Proposals for Printing by Subscription “Essays Fall of Fiers . - - - - - - - - 626

in Verse and Prose, by Anna Williams” . 549 |Fort Augustus . . . . . . . . . 627

A Project for the Employment of Authors . . 550 |Anoch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ib.

Preface to the Literary Magazine, 1756 . . 553 Glensheals. . . . . . . . . . . . . 629

A Dissertation upon the Greek Comedy, trans- The Highlands . . . . . . . . . . . ib.

lated from Brumoy . . . . . . . . . 554 |Glenelg . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 631

General Conclusion on Brumoy's Greek Theatre 569 |Sky. Armidel . . . . . . . . . . ib.

Coriatachan in Sky . . . . . . . . . 633

Raasay . . . . . . . . . . . . . 634

DEDICATIONS . . . . . . 574–579 | Dunvegan . . . . . . . . . . . 637

- Usinish . . . . . . . . . . . . . 639

Preface to Payne's New Tables of Interest. . 579 |Talisker in sky . . . . . . . . . . . 640

Thoughts on the Coronation of his present Ostig in Sky . . . . . . . . . . . . 641

Majesty King George the Third . - Col . . . . . - - - - - - - . 654
Preface to i. Artists' Catalogue for 1762 . . 583| Grissipol in Col . - - - - - - - . 655

Castle of Col. . . . . . . . . . ib.

Mull . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 659

OPINIONS ON QUESTIONS OF LAW. Ulva . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 661

Inch Kenneth . . . . . . . . . . . ib.

On School Chastisement . . 584
On Vicious intromission . 585
. 586

On Lay-Patronage in the Church of Scotland

On Pulpit Censure . . . . . . . . .

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PRAYERS AND MEDITATIONS, with

Preface by the Rev. George Strahan, D.D. 669

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THE Life ofc owley, notwithstanding the penury of English biography, has been written by Dr. Sprat, an author whose pregnancy of imagination and el ce of language have deservedly set him high in the ranks of literature; but his zeal of friendship, or ambition of eloquence, has roduced a funeral oration rather than a history: e has given the character, not the life, of Cowley; for he writes with solittle detail, that scarcely anything is distinctly known, but all is shown confused and enlarged through the mist of paneoric. AsRAHAM Cowley was born in the year one thousand six hundred and eighteen. His father was a grocer, whose condition Dr. Sprat conceals under the general appellation of a citizen; and, what would probably not have been less carefully supj. the omission of his name in the register of St. Dunstan's parish gives reason to suspect that his father was a sectary. Whoever he was, he died before the birth of his son, and consequently left him to the care of his mother; whom Wood represents as struggling earnestly to procure him a literary education, and who, as she fived to the age of eighty, had her solicitude rewarded by seeing her son eminent, and, I hope, by seeing him fortunate, and partaking his prosperity. We know, at least, from Sprat's account, that he always acknowledged her care, and justly paid the dues of filial gratitude. In the window of his mother's apartment lay Spenser's Fairy Queen; in which he very early took delight to read, till, by feeling the charms of verse, he became, as he relates, irrecoverably a poet. Such are the accidents which, sometimes remembered, and perhaps sometimes forgotten, produce that particular designation of mind, and propensity for some certain science or employment, which is commonly called genius. The true genius is a mind of large general powers, accidentally determined to some particular direction. Sir Joshua Reynolds, the great painter of the present age, had the first fondness for his art excited by the perusal of Richardson's treatise. By his mother's solicitation he was admitted into Westminster School, where he was soon distinguished. He was wont, says Sprat, to relate, “That he had this defect in his memory at that

time, that his teachers never could bring it to retain the ordinary rules of grammar.”

This is an instance of the natural desire of . to propagate a wonder. It is surely very difficult to wo thing as it was i. when Sprat could not refrain from amplifying a commodious incident, though the book to which he prefixed his narrative contained his confutation. A memory admitting some things, and rejectin others, an intellectual digestion that concocte the pulp of learning, but refused the husks, had the appearance of an instinctive elegance, of a particular provision made by Nature for literary politeness. But in the author's own honest relation, the marvel vanishes: he was, he says, such “an enemy to all constraint, that his master never could prevail on him to learn the rules without book.” He does not tell that he could not learn the rules; but that, being able to perform his exercises without them, and being an “enemy to constraint,” he spared himself the labour.

Among the English poets, Cowley, Milton, and Pope, might be said “to lisp in numbers,” and have given such early proofs, not only of powers of language, but of comprehension of things, as to more tardy minds seem scarcely credible. But of the learned puerilities of Cowley there is no doubt, since a volume of his poems was not only written, but printed in his thirteenth year;" containing, with other poetical compositions, “The tragical History of Pyramus and Thisbe,” written when he was ten years old; and “Constantia and Philetus,” written two years after.

While he was yet at school he produced a comedy called “Love's Riddle,” though it was not

ublished till he had been some time at Cam|. This comedy is of the pastoral kind, which requires no acquaintance with the living world, and therefore the time at which it was composed adds little to the wonders of Cowley's minority.

* This volume was not published before 1633, when Cowley was fifteen years old. Dr. Johnson, as well as former biographers, seems to have been misled by the portrait of Cowley being by mistake marked with the age of thirteen years.-R.

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