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he kept the audience in a high state of exhiliration. No city epicure ever did ampler honours to a turtle feast, than did Dicky Suet, whenever he had an oppor. tunity of dramatic mastication. He seemed on these occasions to have reserved his appetite for a grand scenic display of gormandising; of which the pork on Peter's supper-table, and the leg of lamb in No Song no Supper, are sufficient instances. Mathews, who inherits a large portion of Suet's peculiar whim, plays Yuseph very comically. With these two admirable comedians full in our remembrance, it is only charitable to forget Gattie.

Leopold was sustained by Bannister with all his vivacity and humour. He and Storace were born to act with each other. Nothing could be more arch and sprightly than the Signora's air and dance in the second act, and Bannister's by-play. Her rich mellow tones, her laughing eye, her gaiety, and good humour, rendered her Lilla a truly captivating performance. Harley's Leopold is lively and spirited. Miss Love bas acquired considerable popularity in Lilla, and she well deserves it all. A beautiful countenance and a graceful air are not her only merits.

The Seraskier, as far as regards the acting, has little else to do but to look fierce and amorous

!

“And dwell such mighty souls in little men ?"

Braham looks both to a miracle-though much of the former may be ascribed to a huge turban, a pair of mustachios, and a scimitar of no common dimensions; and the latter, to a voice than which a finer never serenaded a lady, in or out of trousers.

It is a pernicious custom for a singer, out of his own vanity and caprice, to introduce songs that belong not to the piece. What can be more absurd than to hear a stiffnecked dandy chant “ Scots wha' ha,to a peaceable party of ladies and gentlemen in a drawing-room, or a

whiskered hero warble forth “ Love among the Roses," to a regiment of soldiers in a tented field. We can, however, pardon Braham's introduction of Shield's exquisite ballad “ My Heart with Love is Beating,” in this opera, as it is perfectly relevant to the character and

His execution of it is highly tasteful and im| passioned.

D-G.

scene.

Costume.

SERASKIER.- White spangled shirt and trousers-red fly-yellow satiu robe-yellow boots-turban and cimeter.

COL. COHENBERG.-Green Austrian uniform-black boots.

YUSEPH.-White trousers-puisse-coloured body and cloak, or tunic-red turban.

LEOPOLD. - Drab-coloured donblet and trunk - cloak -- blue stockings-russet shoes.

PETER.-Brown ibid.

MICHAEL.-Gray ibid.
ANSLEM.-Light brown, trimmed with orange ibid
ISMAEL.-White tronsers--crimson tunic and robe.
PEASANTS.- Drab tanics and breeches-blue stocking s.
OFFICERS.-White trousers-crimson tunics and robes.

EUNUCHS.-White bodies and trousers-red flies and turbans russet boots.

FIRST SOLDIER.-Green Austrian dress--pelisse, &c.
SECOND SOLDIER.-Ibid.

CATHARINE.-Handsome white satin ani beads.

LILLA.-First dress: White body and tabs-scarlet petticoat, trimmed with blue. Second dress: White satin dress and robetronsers-turban and slippers.

GHITA.-Green body and tabs-white petticoat, trimmed with green.

FATIMA.-Crimson satin dress and robe-white trousers--turban.

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Miss Love is the daughter of a deceased officer in his majesty's service, and, if dramatic records be true, was born in Cheapside, in the year 1801. Having at an early age displayed a talent for music, she was placed under the tuition of Mr. D. Corri, and such was her rapid improvement in that divine science, that her future success appeared no longer equivocal; and, on her introduction to Mr. Arnold, she was immediately engaged for four years, to take the leading vocal parts at the Lyceum, where she soon became a great favourite, and, at the close of her engagement, was offered liberal terms by the managers of Covent Garden. Her appearance on the boards of that theatre was hailed with very general applause.

An accidental circumstance, the indisposition of Miss M. Tree, brought Miss Love forward in a prominent character sooner than might have been expected-this was Marina, in the operatic entertainment of Cortez, which, at a very short notice she performed to the entire satisfaction of the audience and the managers ; that the good opinion already entertained by both parties of her abilities was amply confirmed. She is a sprightly actress, and a pleasing rather than a great singer. She has since made many provincial tours with flattering success. She is at present attached to the Drury-Lane company, and ranks among its most favourite vocalists. Miss Love las played a variety of characters with considerable success-among her best attempts is Lilla, in the Siege of Belgrade.

RDG.

At the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane.
1824.

1828 Seraskier

Mr. Sapio.

Mr. Braham Colonel Cohenberg

Mr. Wallack.

Mr. Cooper. Yuseph

Mr. Gattie.

Mr. Gattie. Leopold

Mr. Harley.

Mr. Harley. Peter

Mr. Fitzwilliam.

Mr. J. Russell. Michael

Mr. Hughes.

Mr. Hughes. Anslem

Mr. Bedford.

Mr. Bedford. Ismael

Mr. G. Smith.

Mr. G. Smith,

Mr. Honor, Peasants

Mr. Nelson, Mr. Sheriff. Mr. Hope,

Mr. Brown, Officers

Mr. Brady,

Mr. Gregory. Eunuck

Mr. Seymour. First Soldier

Mr. Wakefield. Second Soldier

Mr. Darnley.

Catharine Lilla Ghita Fatima

Miss Graddon.
Miss Stephens.
Miss Povey.
Miss Carr.

Miss A. Tree. Miss Love. Miss Nicoll. Miss Weston,

Soldiers, Guards, Blacks, Eunuchs, &c.

STAGE DIRECTIONS.

The Conductors of this work print no Plays but those which they have seen acted. The Stage Directions are given from their own personal observations, during the most recent performances.

EXITS and ENTRANCES. R. means Right ; L. Left; D. F. Door in Flüt ; R. D. Right Door ; L. D. Left Door; S. E. Second Entrance; U. E. Upper Entrance ; M. D. Middle Door.

RELATIVE POSITIONS. R. means Right ; L. Left ; C. Centre ; R. C. Right of Centre; L. C. Lest of Centre. R. RC. C. LC.

L. * The Reader is supposed to be on the Stage, facing the Audience.

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SCENE 1.—The Turkish Encampment, near Belgrade, in
the distance.-The Curtain rises at the first stroke of the
cymbals.- Turkish Peasantry discovered, ranged R.-
Turkish Soldiers, with cymbúls, triangle, long drum, 8c.
ranged, L.

CHORUS.
Enter, during the chorus, Turkish Soldiers and Servian

Women, L. U. E.
Wave our prophet's fam'd standard of glory on high,
Till the envious moon die away in the sky;
And, like the pale Christians, leave Danube's fair stream,
To reflect our victorious crescent's bright beam.
[The Chorus. Singers fall back, R. and 1.The Servian

Women dance, and exit, L, 0. E. -The Military Band
exeunt, L, s. E.-The Chorus-Singers then advance to
the front.

Enter YusEPH, L. Be silent, you soldiers, His Highness the Seraskier is coming,—he is just arrived with the Turkish army under his command, to relieve Belgrade. I have been conversing with him. I told bim of your loyalty to the Sublime Porte.-Sir,--your highne s--my dear highness, says I (for we talked very familiarly). I am the chief magistrate of this village.--I know the Ottoman Porte has not more loyal subjects in his whole province of Servia ; and, as for your highness-always talking of your highness--your highness's name is never out of our

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