Shakespeare, Machiavelli, and Montaigne: Power and Subjectivity from Richard II to Hamlet

Portada
Oxford University Press, 2002 - 286 páginas
From 1595-1600 Shakespeare dissected the workings of political power in the four histories of the Henriad and in Hamlet in ways which were remarkably parallel - and were perhaps influenced by - the ideas of the father of modern political analysis, Niccolo Machiavelli. However, the very sameplays simultaneously explored the dynamics of self- and identity-formation under new conditions of secular modernity, in the process producing such memorable characters as Richard II, Prince Hal, Falstaff, and Hamlet. Hugh Grady argues that in analyzing modern subjectivity, Shakespeare re-producednot the ideas of Machiavelli, but those of Michel de Montaigne, that Renaissance definer of shifting identities and subjectivities and of complexly formed, sceptical knowledge. In so doing, Shakespeare in effect contributes to the theoretical debates over power and subjectivity in literary andcultural studies at the dawn of the twenty-first century.
 

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Contenido

HISTORICISM AND THE CULTURAL
1
A SHAKESPEARIAN MACHIAVELLIAN MOMENT
26
FROM
58
MONTAIGNE SHAKESPEARE AND
109
THE REIFIED WORLDS OF 2 HENRYIVAND HENRY V
180
HAMLETAND THE TRAGEDY OF
243
BIBLIOGRAPHY
266
INDEX
283
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Acerca del autor (2002)

Hugh Grady is a Professor of English, Arcadia University.

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