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their landlord the npholsterer, relating to their man ners and conversation, as also concerning the remarks which they made in this country: for, next to the forming a right notion of such strangers, I should be desirous of learning what ideas they have conceived: of us.

The upholsterer finding my friend very inquisitive e about these his lodgers, brought him some time since a little bundle of papers, which he assured him were written by king Sa Ga Yean Qua Rash Tow, and, as he supposes, left behind by some mistake.

These papers are now translated, and contain abundance of very odd observations, which I find this little fraternity of kings made during their stay in the isle of Great Britain. I shall present my reader with a short specimen of them in this paper, and may perhaps cominupicate more to him hereafter. In the article of London are the following words, which without doubt are meant of the church of St. Paul.

" On the most rising part of the town there stands a huge house, big enough to contain the whole nation of which I am king. Our good brother E Tow O Koam, king of the Rivers, is of opinion it was made by the hands of that great God to whom it is consecrated. The kings of Granajah and of the Six Nations believe that it was created with the earth, and produced on the same day with the sun and moon. But for my own part, by the best information that I could get of this matter, I am apt to think that this prodigions pile was fashioned into the shape it now bears by several tools and instruments, of which they have a wonderful variety in this country. It was probably at first an huge misshapen rock that grew upon the top of the hili, which the natives of the country (after having cut it into a kind of regular tigrire) bored and hollowed with incredible pains and industry, till they had wrought it into all those beautiful vaults and caverns into which it is divided at this day.

As soon as this rock was thus curionsly scooped to their liking, a pro

digious number of hands must have been employed in chipping the outside of it, which is now as smooth as the surface of a pebble; and is in several places hewn out into pillars that stand like the trunks of so many trees bound about the top with garlands of leaves. I is probable that when this great work was begun, which must have been many hundred years ago, there was some religion among this people; for they give it the name of a temple, and have a tradition that it was designed for men to pay their devotion in. Apd in. deed there are several reasons which make us think that the natives of this country had formerly among them some sort of worship; for they set apart every seventh day as sacred: but upon my going into one of these holy houses on that day, I could not observe any circumstances of devotion in their behaviour. There was indeed a man in black, who was mounted above the rest, and seemed to utter something with a great deal of vehemence; but as for those underneath him, instead of paying their worship to the deity of the place, they were most of them bowing and conrtesying to one another, and a considerable number of them fast asleep

The queen of the country appointed two men to attend us, that had enough of our language to make themselves understood in some few particulars. But we soon perceived these two were great enemies to one another, and did not always agree in the same story. We could make shift to gather out of one of them, that this island was very much infested with a moostrous kind of animals in the shape of men, called Whigs; and be often told us, that he hoped we should meet with none of them in our way, for that if we did, they would be apt to knock us down for being kings.

" Our other interpreter used to talk very much of a kind of animal called a Tory, that was as great a mon. ster as the Whig, and would treat us as ill for being foreigners. These two creatures, it seems, are born

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with a secret antipathy to one another, and engage wheu they meet as naturally as the elephant and the rhinoceros. But as we saw none of either of these species, we are apt to think that our guides deceived us with misrepresentations and fictions, and amused us with an account of such monsters as are not really in their country.

“ These particulars we made a shift to pick out from the discourse of our interpreters; which we put together as well as we could, being able to understand bat here and there a word of what they said, and afterwards making up the meaning of it among ourselves. The men of the country are very cunning and ingeni. ons in handicraft works, but withal so very idle, that we often saw young lusty raw-boned fellows carried up and down the streets in little covered rooms, by a couple of porters, who are bired for that service.Their dress is likewise very barbarous, for they almost strangle themselves about the neck, and bind their bodies with many ligatures, that we are apt to think are the occasion of several distempers among them, which our country is entirely free from. Instead of those beautiful feathers with whicb we adorn oor heads, they often buy up a monstrous bush of hair, which covers their heads, and falls down in a large fleece below the middle of their backs; with which they walk up and down the streets, and are as proud of it as if it was of their own growth.

“ We were invited to one of their public diversions, where we hoped to have seen the great men of their country running down a stag, or pitching a bar, that we might have discovered who were the persons of the greatest abilities among them; but instead of that they conveyed us into an huge room lighted up with abundance of candles, where this lazy people sat still above three hours to see several feats of ingenuity performed by others, who it seems were paid for it.

“ As for the women of the country, not being able to talk with them, we could only make our remarks

it upon them at a distance. They let the þair of their heads

grow to a great length; but as the men make a great show with heads of hair that are none of their own, the women, who they say have very fine heads of hair, tie it up in a knot, aná cover it from being seen. The women look like angels, and wonld be more beautiful than the sun, were it not for little black spots that are apt to break ont in their faces, and sometimes rise in

very odd figures. I have observed that those little blemishes wear off very soon; but when they disappear in one part of the face, they are very apt to break out in another, insomuch that I have seen a spot upon the forehead in the afternoon, which was npon the chin in the morning."

The author then proceeds to show the absurdity of breeches and petticoats, with many other curious observations, which I shall reserve for another occasion. I cannot however conclude this paper without taking notice, that amidst these wild remarks there now and then appears something very reasonable. I canuot likewise forbear observing, that we are all guilty in come measure of the same narrow way of thinking which we meet with ju tbis abstract of the Indian journal, when we fancy the customs, dresses, and manners of other countries are ridiculous and extrava. gant, if they do not resemble those of our own.

C.

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Gargunum mugire putes nemus aut mare Thuscum;
Tanto cum strepitu, ludi spectantur; et artes,
Divitiæque peregrinæ; quibus oblitus actor
Cum stetit in scena, concurrit dextera leva,
Dirit adhuc aliquid ? Nihil sane. Quid placet ergo?
Lana Tarentino violas imitato veneno.

HORATIUS.
IMITATED.
Loud as the wolves on Orca's stormy steep
Howl to the roarings of the northern deep:
Such is the shout, the long-applauding note,
At Qain's high plume, or Oldfield's petticoat:
Or when from court a birth-day suit bestow'd,
Sinks the lost actor in the tawdry load.
Booth enters-hark! the universal peal!--
But has he spoken?-Not a syllablem
What shook the stage, and made the people stare?
Cato's long whig, flow'r'd gown, and lacquer'd chair.

POPE.

ARISTOTLE has observed, that ordinary writers

in tragedy endeavour to raise terror and pity in their andience, not by proper sentiments and expres sions, but by the dresses and decorations of the stage. There is something of this kind very ridicalons in the English theatre. When the author has a mind to terrify us, it thunders: wben he would make us melancholy, the stage is darkened. But among all our tragic artifices, I am the most offended at those which are made use of to inspire us with magnificent ideas of the persons that speak. The ordinary method of making an hero, is to clap a huge plume of feathers apon his head, which rises so very high, that there is often a greater length from bis chio to the top of his head, than to the sole of his foot. One would believe, that we thought a great man and a tall man the same thing, This very much embarrasses the actor, who is forced to bold his neck extremely stiff and steady all the

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