Daily Life in the Industrial United States, 1870-1900

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Greenwood Publishing Group, 2004 - 272 páginas

Daily life in the Industrial age was ever-changing, unsettling, outright dangerous, and often thrilling. Electric power turned night into day, cities swelled with immigrants from the countryside and from Europe, and great factories belched smoke and beat unnatural rhythms while turning out consumer goods at an astonishing pace. Distance and time condensed as rail travel and telegraph lines tied the vast United States together as never before.

First-hand accounts from workers, housewives, and children help illuminate the significant achievements of the era and their impact on the everyday lives of ordinary people. Readers will learn of a broad range of personal experiences, while comprehending the importance of the economic and social developments of the period. A chronology, a glossary, more than 40 photographs, and further reading sources complete the work.

 

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Contenido

2 The Railroad
47
3 The Factory and Organized Labor Responses
71
4 Housework Houses and Women at Home
99
5 Childhood and Family Life
121
6 Consumer Culture
151
7 Leisure and Entertainment
177
8 Education and Health Care
201
9 Religious and Civic Life
223
Not the Gilded Age
243
Glossary
245
Works Cited
249
Index
263
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Acerca del autor (2004)

JULIE HUSBAND is Assistant Professor of English at the University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls.

JIM O'LOUGHLIN is Assistant Professor of English at the University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls.

Información bibliográfica