Introduction to the Gradual Reader, Or Primary School Enunciator, Pt. 2: The Child's Second Step, Taken at the Right Time

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Crosby and Nichols, 1863
 

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Contenido

Reading Lesson
19
Enunciation rd rf rk rs rt rz rdzh
22
Reading Lesson
23
Enunciation bl fl kl pi si
24
Reading Lesson
25
Enunciation tsh sk sp st
26
Reading Lesson
27
Enunciation sm snng ngkbz dz gz vz i
29
Enunciation br drfr kr grprtrthr
30
Reading Lesson
31
Enunciation fs ks ps ts kt pt
32
Reading Lesson
33
Enunciation dw kw sw tw dzh thzft shr
34
Reading Lesson
35
A Hyphen
36
A Comma
37
Reading Lesson Voice suspended at a Comma
38
Simple Suspension or Rising Slide of one Note
39
Colon
40
The Camel The Woodman and his Child
41
Period Dash
42
Enunciation Unaccented er like er in her
43
Morning
44
Enunciation Unaccented ing
45
Autumn
46
Enunciation Unaccented ent and ence
47
A Greenhouse
48
Interrogation Point
49
Rising and Falling Slides
50
Enunciation bl bid biz dl did dlz
53
Flowers
54
Enunciation fl fd flz gl gld glz
55
A Storm
56
Enunciation kl kid klz pi pld ph
57
The Balloon
58
Quotation Marks
59
How Rollo learned to read 46ootf
60
Enunciation si sld slz tl tld tlz
63
Part of the Plan for Rollo to learn to read Abbott
64
Enunciation vl vld viz tl zld zlz
65
Study made a Duty not an Amusement Abbott
66
Exclamation Point
67
Mother and Child Mrs Sigourney
68
Enunciation skr spr str
70
The Perseverance of Little Jane Useful little Stories
71
Enunciation Idz Imz Ivz ndz ngz zmz
74
Hymn in Prose Mrs Barbauld
75
Enunciation rbz rdz rlz rmz rnz rvz
76
Evil for Evil or Temper Improved Author of Willie Rogers
77
The New England Boys Song about Thanksgiving
79
Enunciation Ifs Iks Ips mps sps sks
82
Desire to go to School Author of Rhymes for Children
83
Enunciation fts kts Its mts nts sts
84
The Way to obey Abbott
85
Enunciation rks rps rts rtsh rst
88
The Child and the Flowers Mary Howitt
103
Enunciation Unaccented ant ants and once
105
What is meant by a Fictitious Story Abbott
106
Enunciation er in every general c
108
M Child
109
Enunciation er in yenerous and ar in regular
112
The Great Creature a Balloon Merrys Museum
113
The Boy and the Bird
116
Enunciation Terrible probable c
118
Little Mary is cross today Mrs L M Child
119
Review of Consonant Combinations
128
Rising Inflection before or and Falling Inflection after it in a question
129
Little Children Mary Ilowitt
130
Rising and Falling Inflections
132
The Parrot Mrs L M Child
133
Review of Consonant Combinations
139
The Use of Flowers Mary HowUt
140
Review of Consonant Combinations
142
All Things decay Mrs Barbauld
143
Enunciation dn dnd dm fn fnd fnz
145
All Things fade to be renewed Mrs Barbauld
146
Enunciation kn knd km pn pnd pnz
147
The AppleTree Mary Howitt
148
Enunciation sn snd snz tn tnd tm
150
A Fairy Story Mothers Lessons
151
Enunciation vn vnd mz zn znd zm thn thnz
153
The Rainbow Author of Rhymes for Children
154
Enunciation Iv Ivd rbd pts
156
Night The Eye that never sleepeth Mrs Barbauld
157
Review of Consonant Combinations
161
Happiness from charitable Industry Author of Chit Chat
162
Enunciation e and o in unaccented ern ers and ors like e in her
164
The Revengeful Tortoise Rufus Dawes
165
The First Grief Anonymous
166
Enunciation Final ow like o in no
168
The Old Slate Mrs L J Hall
169
Enunciation ai in ain and i in ine when unaccented like i in pin
173
Too lazy for any Thing Rufus Dawes
174
Enunciation c in unaccented ess like e in less
175
The Parenthesis
176
The Butterfly and the Flowers
178
114
185
115
187
116
190
117
192
118
197
119
201
120
206
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207
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208
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212
127
213

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Página 141 - To make the river flow. The clouds might give abundant rain ; The nightly dews might fall, And the herb that keepeth life in man, Might yet have drunk them all.
Página 159 - When there is no light of the sun, nor of the moon ; when there is no lamp in the house, nor any little star twinkling through the thick clouds; that eye seeth every where, in all places, and watcheth continually over all the families of the earth.
Página 158 - The sheep rest upon their soft fleeces, and their loud bleating is no more heard amongst the hills. There is no sound of a number of voices, or of children at play, or the trampling of busy feet, and of people hurrying to and fro. •The smith's hammer is not heard upon the anvil; nor the harsh saw of the carpenter. All men are stretched on their quiet beds : and the child sleeps upon the breast of its> mother. Darkness is spread over the skies, and darkness is upon the ground: every eye is shut,...
Página 111 - For this is Thanksgiving Day. Over the river and through the wood, And straight through the barnyard gate! We seem to go Extremely slow; It is so hard to wait! Over the river and through the wood; Now grandmother's cap I spy! Hurrah for the fun! Is the pudding done? Hurrah for the pumpkin pie!
Página 176 - The only point where human bliss stands still, And tastes the good without the fall to ill ; Where only merit...
Página 189 - LET dogs delight to bark and bite, For God hath made them so; Let bears and lions growl and fight, For 'tis their nature too. But, children, you should never let Such angry passions rise ; Your little hands were never made To tear each other's eyes.
Página 167 - He would not hear my voice, fair child ! He may not come to thee; The face that once like spring-time smiled, On earth no more thou'lt see. A rose's brief, bright life of joy, Such unto him was given ; — Go ! thou must play alone, my boy ! Thy brother is in heaven.
Página 109 - Thanksgiving Day Over the river and through the wood, To grandfather's house we go; The horse knows the way To carry the sleigh Through the white and drifted snow. Over the river and through the wood— Oh, how the wind does blow ! It stings the toes And bites the nose, As over the ground we go. Over the river and through the wood, To have a first-rate play. Hear the bells ring, " Ting-a-ling-ding !
Página 92 - There is a land where the roses are without thorns, where the flowers are not mixed with brambles. In that land, there is eternal spring, and light without any cloud. The tree of life groweth in the midst thereof; rivers of pleasures are there, and flowers that never fade.
Página 167 - The flowers run wild— the flowers we sowed Around our garden tree; Our vine is drooping with its load — Oh! Call him back to me.

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