The History of Scotland During the Reigns of Queen Mary and of King James VI. Till His Accession to the Crown of England, Volumen2

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Página 181 - Mary's sufferings exceed, both in degree and in duration, those tragical distresses which fancy has feigned to excite sorrow and commiseration ; and while we survey them, we are apt altogether to forget her frailties, we think of her faults with less indignation, and approve of our tears, as if they were shed for a person who had attained much nearer to pure virtue.
Página 178 - It was erected in the same hall where she had been tried, raised a little above the floor, and covered, as well as a chair, the cushion, and block, with black cloth. Mary mounted the steps with alacrity, beheld all this apparatus of death with an unaltered countenance, and, signing herself with the cross, she sat down in the chair. Beale read the warrant for execution with a loud voice, to which...
Página 176 - Her money, her jewels, and her clothes, she distributed among her servants, according to their rank or merit. She wrote a short letter to the king of France, and another to the duke of Guise...
Página 177 - Stuart delivered from all her cares, and such an end put to her tedious sufferings, as she has long expected. Bear witness that I die constant in my religion ; firm in my fidelity towards Scotland ; and unchanged in my affection to France. Commend me to my son. Tell him I have done nothing injurious to his kingdom, to his honour, or to his rights; and God forgive all those who have thirsted, without cause, for my blood.
Página 181 - Bothwell's artful address and important services can justify her attachment to that nobleman. Even the manners of the age, licentious as they were, are no apology for this unhappy passion ; nor can they induce us to look on that tragical and infamous scene which followed upon it with less abhorrence.
Página 180 - Polite, affable, infmuating, fprightly, and capable of fpeaking and of writing with equal cafe and dignity. Sudden, however, and violent in all her attachments; becaufe her heart was warm and unfufpicious. Impatient of contradiction ; becaufe ihe had been accuftomed from her infancy to be treated as a queen.
Página 177 - An Agnus Dei hung by a pomander chain at her neck ; her beads at her girdle; and in her hand she carried a crucifix of ivory.
Página 177 - Melvil, the master of her household, who had been secluded for some weeks from her presence, was permitted to take his last farewell. At the sight of a mistress whom he tenderly loved, in such a situation, he melted into tears ; and as he was bewailing her condition, and complaining of his own hard fate, in being appointed to carry the account of such a mournful event into Scotland, Mary replied, " Weep not, good Melvil, there is at present great cause for rejoicing.
Página 44 - Rigid and uncomplying himself, he showed no indulgence to the infirmities of others. Regardless of the distinctions of rank and character, he uttered his admonitions with an acrimony and vehemence, more apt to irritate than to reclaim.
Página 175 - Fotheringay, and demanded access to the Queen, read in her presence the warrant for execution, and required her to prepare to die next morning. Mary heard them to the end without emotion, and crossing herself in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost,

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