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POETICAL WORKS

OF

GEOFF. CHAUCER.

IN FOURTEEN VOLUMES.
THE MISCELLANEOUS PIECES

From Urry's Edition 1721,
THE CANTERBURY TALES

From Tyrwhitt's Edition 1775.

Grete well CHAUCER whan ye mete----
Of ditees and of songes glade,
The which he---made,
The londe fullfilled is over all.

GOWER.
My maifer CHAUCER---chiefe poete nf Bretayne.---
Whom all this londe schulde of ryght preferre,
Sith of our langage he was the lode-sterre--.-
That made first to dy ftylle and rayne
The gold dewe dropys of speche and eloquence
Into our tunge thrugh his excellence.

LYDGATE,
The honour of English tong is dede....
My maysler CHAUCER, floure of eloquence,
Mirrour offructuous entendement,
Universel fadirin science-...
This londis verray trefour and richesse....
The firste fynder of our fayre langage.

OCCLEVE.
Venerabili CHAUCER, principall peete but pere,
Hevinly trumpet, orlege and regulere,
In eloquence balme, condict and diall,
Mylky fountane, clere ffrand, and rois riall,
or fresche endito throw Albioun iland braid. DOUGLAS

O reverend CHAUCER! rose of rethouris all,
As in oure toung flour imperial
That raise in Brittane evir, quna reidis right
Thou beiris of Makers the triumphs royall,
The fresche enamilt termes celeftiall:
This mater couth haif illuminit full bricht,
Was thou nocht, of our Inglis all the light,
surmounting every toung terreftriall
As far as Mayi's morrow dois midnight.

DUNBAR.

VOL. VI.

EDINBURG:
AT THE Apollo Press, BY THE MARTINS.

Anno 1782.

1

POETICAL WORKS

OF

GEOFFREY CHAUCER.

VOL, VI.

CONTAINING HIS

CANTERBURY TALES, viz. THE COKES TALE OF GAMEL. THE PARDON. AND TAPST.

1 THE PLOWMANS TALE,

THE MARCH. SECOND TALE, esc. &c.

But natheles certain
I can right now no thrifty Tale sain,
But CHAUCER, (though he can but lewedly
On metres and on riming craftils)
Hath fayd hem in fwiche Englith as he can
Of oide tinc, as knoweth many a man ;
And if he have not fayd hem, leve b other,
In o book, he bath fayd hem in another.---
Who fo that wol his large Volume feke. TALES, ver. 4465.

Dan CHAUCER, well of English undehl'd,
On Fame's ctcrnal bead-roll worthy to be fil'd----
Old Dan Geffrey, in whofe gentle fpright
The pure well-head of poetry did dwell---
He whilft.clived was the foveraigne head
Of thepherds all-------

SPENSER
Old CH AUCER, like the morning star,
Tous discovers day from far;
His light those mifts and clouds ditolu'd
Which ourda:k nauoi lon involv'd;
But he descending to the shades
Darkness again the age invades.

DENHAM.
CHAUCER, him who firft with harmony informid
The language of our fathers.--His legends blithe
fie fang of love or knighthood, or the wiles
Of homely lifc, thro'each efale and age
The fathions and the follies of the world
With cunning hand portraying-----
Him who in tinies----..
Dark and untaught began with charming verse
To tame the rudeness of his native land.

AKENSIDE.

EDINBURG:
at the Apolío Press, by THE MARTINS.

Anno 1782.

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THE CANTERBURY TALES.

THE COKE'S TALE OF GAMELYN.
Now lithin and listinith, and
Herkinith you aright,
And ye shullin herè me tell
You of a doughti knight.
Sir Johan of Boundis clepid was

5
This ilkè knight'is name;
Wele coudin he of noriture,
And eke of mochil game.

The Coke's Tale of Gamelyn] so many of the mfl. hare this Tale that I can hardly think it could be unknown to the former editors of this poet's Works; nor can I think of a reason why they negleded to publith it. Posibly they met only vil those mfi. that had not this Tale in them, and contented therselves with the number of Tales they found in those mil. If they had any of thote ml. in which it is I cannot give a reale! why they did not give it a place amongft the reft, uniets at:cy doubted of its being genuine; but because I find it in fi mar.y ml. I have no doubt of it, and therefore make it publick, and call it the fifth Tale. In all the mil. it is called The Coke's 'Tale, and therefore I call it so in like manner: but had I fod it without an inscription, and liad been left to my fancy to have bettowed it on which of the pilgrims i liad picale, I thould certainly have adjudged it to the squre's Ye:man, who though as minutely described by Chaucer and characterized in the third place, yet I find no 'Tale of his in any file mil.: and because I think there is not any one that would fit liim so well as this, I have ventured to place liis picture hefore this 'Tale, tho' I leave the Cook in potleifion of the title. Urry.

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