State Intervention in English Education: A Short History from the Earliest Times Down to 1833

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University Press, 1902 - 366 páginas
 

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Página 92 - That in the university of Oxford, the greater part of the public professors have for these many years given up altogether even the pretence of teaching.
Página 196 - ... hospital for the maintenance and education of exposed and deserted young children...
Página 305 - ... wonted course. Make sobriety a habit, and intemperance will be hateful and hard, — make prudence a habit, and reckless profligacy will be as contrary to the nature of the child grown an adult, as the most atrocious crimes are to any of your Lordships.
Página 257 - And though a linguist should pride himself to have all the tongues that Babel cleft the world into, yet if he have not studied the solid things in them as well as the words and lexicons, he were nothing so much to be esteemed a learned man, as any yeoman or tradesman competently wise in his mother dialect only.
Página 207 - All that will, may send their children, and have them educated freely ; and those that do not wish to have education for nothing, may pay for it if they please.
Página 85 - Let us rather, according to the Scriptures, look unto that part of the race which is before us than look back to that which is already attained. First therefore, amongst so many great foundations of colleges in Europe, I find it strange that they are all dedicated to professions, and none left free to arts and sciences at large.
Página 217 - The public can facilitate this acquisition, by establishing in every parish or district a little school, where children may be taught for a reward so moderate, that even a common labourer may afford it ; the master being partly, but not wholly paid by the public ; because, if he was wholly, or even principally paid by it, he would soon learn to neglect his business.
Página 216 - ... an education suitable' to their station in life ; a duty pointed out by reason, and. of far the greatest importance of any. For, as Puffendorf very [451] well observes, («) it is not easy to imagine or allow, that a parent has conferred any considerable benefit upon his child by bringing him into the world, if he afterwards entirely neglects his culture and education, and suffers him to grow up like a mere beast, to lead a life useless to others, and shameful to himself.
Página 222 - However specious in theory the project might be, of giving education to the labouring classes of the poor, it would in effect be found to be prejudicial to their morals and happiness ; it would teach them to despise their lot in life, instead of making them good servants in agriculture, and other laborious employment to which their rank in society had destined them...
Página 216 - For a very small expense the public can facilitate, can encourage, and can even impose upon almost the whole body of the people, the necessity of acquiring those most essential parts of...

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