The Cambridge History of English Literature: Prose and poetry: Sir Thomas North to Michael Drayton

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Sir Adolphus William Ward, Alfred Rayney Waller
The University Press, 1909

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Página 298 - Take but degree away, untune that string, And hark, what discord follows ! each thing meets In mere oppugnancy : — The bounded waters Should lift their bosoms higher than the shores, And make a sop of all this solid globe : Strength should be lord of imbecility, And the rude son should strike his father dead : Force should be right; or rather, right and wrong (Between whose endless jar justice resides) Should lose their names, and so should justice too.
Página 41 - And mount Sinai was altogether on a smoke, because the Lord descended upon it in fire ; and the smoke thereof ascended as the smoke of a furnace, and the whole mount quaked greatly...
Página 44 - ... this goodly frame, the earth, seems to me a sterile promontory; this most excellent canopy, the air, look you, this brave o'erhanging firmament, this majestical roof fretted with golden fire, why, it appears no other thing to me than a foul and pestilent congregation of vapours. What a piece of work is man! how noble in reason! how infinite in faculty! in form and moving how express and admirable! in action how like an angel! in apprehension how like a god! the beauty of the world! the paragon...
Página 41 - God, give us grace that we may cast away the works of darkness, and put upon us the armour of light, now in the time of this mortal life, (in the which thy Son Jesus Christ came to visit us in great humility...
Página 44 - What a piece of work is a man! how noble in reason! how infinite in faculty! in form and moving how express and admirable! in action how like an angel! in apprehension how like a god! the beauty of the world! the paragon of animals! And yet, to me, what is this quintessence of dust? man delights not me; no, nor woman neither, though by your smiling you seem to say so.
Página 211 - What miracles we harmless lovers wrought. First, we loved well and faithfully, Yet knew not what we loved, nor why, Difference of sex no more we knew, Than our guardian angels do; Coming and going, we Perchance might kiss, but not between those meals; Our hands ne'er touched the seals, Which nature, injured by late law, sets free: These miracles we did; but now alas, All measure, and all language, I should pass, Should I tell what a miracle she was. The Damp hen I am dead, and doctors know not why....
Página 21 - I have compelled streames to run cleane backward to their spring. By charmes I make the calme Seas rough, and make the rough Seas plaine And cover all the Skie with Cloudes, and chase them thence againe.
Página 47 - Let us be glad and rejoice, and give honour to him: for the marriage of the Lamb is come, and his wife hath made herself ready. And to her was granted that she should be arrayed in fine linen, clean and white: for the fine linen is the righteousness of saints.
Página 54 - EVEN such is time, that takes in trust Our youth, our joys, our all we have, And pays us but with earth and dust; Who, in the dark and silent grave, When we have wandered all our ways, Shuts up the story of our days; But from this earth, this grave, this dust, My God shall raise me up, I trust!

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