Knowles's Elocutionist: A First-class Rhetorical Reader and Recitation Book ...

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J. Mowatt & Company, 1844 - 322 páginas

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Página 118 - ... little did I dream that I should have lived to see such disasters fallen upon her in a nation of gallant men, in a nation of men of honour and of cavaliers. I thought ten thousand swords must have leaped from their scabbards to avenge even a look that threatened her with insult. But the age of chivalry is gone. That of sophisters, economists, and calculators has succeeded; and the glory of Europe is extinguished for ever.
Página 244 - Equal and exact justice to all men, of whatever state or persuasion, religious or political : — peace, commerce, and honest friendship with all nations, entangling alliances with none : -^the support of the state governments in all their rights, as the most competent administrations for our domestic concerns, and the surest bulwarks against anti-republican tendencie^ — the preservation of the general government in its whole constitutional vigor, as the sheet anchor of our peace at home, and safety...
Página 74 - Besides, sir, we have no election. If we were base enough to desire it, it is now too late to retire from the contest. There is no retreat but in submission and slavery. Our chains are forged. Their clanking may be heard on the plains of Boston ! The war is inevitable — and let it come!! I repeat it, sir, let it come !!! "' It is vain, sir, to extenuate the matter. Gentlemen may cry, peace, peace — but there is no peace.
Página 72 - Is this the part of wise men, engaged in a great and arduous struggle for liberty? Are we disposed to be of the number of those who, having eyes, see not, and having ears, hear not, the things which so nearly concern their temporal salvation? For my part, whatever anguish of spirit it may cost, I am willing to know the whole truth; to know the worst and to provide for it. I have but one lamp by which my feet are guided; and that is the lamp of experience. I know of no way of judging the future but...
Página 74 - It is in vain, sir, to extenuate the matter. Gentlemen may cry peace, peace! But there is no peace! The war is actually begun! The next gale that sweeps from the north will bring to our ears the clash of resounding arms! Our brethren are already in the field ! Why stand we here idle? What is it that gentlemen wish? What would they have? Is life so dear, or peace so sweet, as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery? Forbid it, Almighty God! I know not what course others may take; but as...
Página 51 - STUDIES serve for delight, for ornament, and for ability. Their chief use for delight is in privateness and retiring ; for ornament, is in discourse ; and for ability, is in the judgment and disposition of business. For expert men can execute, and perhaps judge of particulars, one by one ; but the general counsels, and the plots, and marshalling of affairs come best from those that are learned.
Página 125 - Some mute, inglorious Milton, here may rest — Some Cromwell, guiltless of his country's blood. Th' applause of list ning senates to command, The threats of pain and ruin to despise, To scatter plenty o'er a smiling land, And read their history in a nation's eyes, Their lot forbade : nor circumscribed alone Their growing virtues, but their crimes confined^ Forbade to wade through slaughter to a throne, And shut the gates of mercy on mankind...
Página 73 - They tell us, sir, that we are weak; unable to cope with so formidable an adversary. But when shall we be stronger? Will it be the next weeK, or the next year? Will it be when we are totally disarmed, and when a British guard shall be stationed in every house? Shall we gather strength by irresolution and. inaction?
Página 244 - ... the diffusion of information, and arraignment of all abuses at the bar of public reason ; freedom of religion ; freedom of the press ; and freedom of person, under the protection of the habeas corpus ; and trial by juries impartially selected. These principles form the bright constellation which has gone before us, and guided our steps through an age of revolution and reformation.
Página 259 - Against the insidious wiles of foreign influence (I conjure you to believe me, fellowcitizens,) the jealousy of a free people ought to be constantly. awake; since history and experience prove, that foreign influence is one of the most baneful foes of Republican Government.

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