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Embellished with a View of an Ancient Mansion at High SUNDERLAND

Contents.
TOPOGRAPHY, PICTURESQUE MATHEMATICAL REPOSITORY.
SCENERY, &c.

Solutions to Mathematical Queries,.. 387
Account of an Ancient Mansion at

QRIGINAL POETRY.
High Sunderland.......

341 Translation of the Latin Lines on
Peak Scenery
343 Roche' Abbey

388
Geology of Derbyshire.
344 Sonnet ..

389 Stoke Hall... 345 Sonnet'to Laura..

390 On the Antiquity of the Mansion at

The Rose

390 Norton-Lees..... 347 Translations from Petrarch

391* MISCELLANEOUS CORRESPOND.

Answer to Juvenis's Charade op
Oxford...

392
ENCE, &e.
Alienism...

349

ANALYTICAL REVIEW.
A Table of all the Battles that have

Alexander on the Preservation of Health 393 been fought in Great - Britain, Rbodes's Peak Scenery

395 from the first landing of Julius Simond's Journal, continued from Cæsar... 350 our last,

.... 398 Comparison of the principal Cities of

LITERATURE.
Ancient and Modern Times, by

Literary and Scientific Intelligence.. 402
Mr. Bigland.....

354
Literary Annonciations

404 CONVERSATIONS ...

365
General Monthly Catalogne

405 Observations on the Usury Laws.... 368

MONTHLY CHRONICLE. $. I. Law on the Antiquity of

407 Foreign Events

375 drinking Healths..

Parliamentary Intelligence...... 409 Remarks on Mr. Hofland's Painting

Domestic Occurrences, London...... 411 of Jerusalem at the Time of the

General.........

413 Crucifixion, by Wm. Carey ... 377

Yorkshire

415 Anecdotes of eminent Painters...... 379

MONTHLY REGISTER:
Observations on the prevailing Cus-

Marriages.

415
toms, Dress, &c. of the Inhabitants
of Great-Britain...

380
Deaths..........

416 Remarkable Instance of the Sortes

MONTHLY REPORTS.
Virgilianæ
385 Meterological Results

417
Query by Culina.....
885 List of Bankrupts...

417 Latin Epitaph on a Dog. 386 Price Current, &c.

419

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SHEFFIELD:
PRINTED AND PUBLISHED BY BENTHAM AND RAY, HIGH-STREET,
(To whom Communications, post paid, may be addressed :)

SOLD, ALSO, BY
BALDWIN, CRADOCK, AND JOY, LONDON; AND ALL OTHER BOOKSELLERS.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS.

WE have this month the pleasing task of acknowledging the receipt of a large supply of original communications from our friends.

Besides those which appear, we bave received Topography of Rotherham,- An elaborate History of the Judicial Combat -Mr. W-W-t's paper on Monastic Institutions.-P.G.’sremarks on the Gift of Tongues,"-J. B.'s translation of Petrarch's SonDets,-the Steam-Packet,-Mr. Langley on Fate,-A. M.'s lines on the Sun,--Mr. Harksey's Mathematical Solutions and Questions,-Lines on a Seal with " Depechez vousfor its motto, Sonnet to Laura,- Flora's lines on the Goldfinch,-and Hints and Saggestions from P. S. which we will not forget.

We have some reason to think that Februa is occasionally a smoker ; we mean not, of tobacco, but of something far more pungent, annoying, and frequently injurious.

ber examinatio the observations on his subject be not thought too particular, we shall give them a place in our next,

Vermiculus,-P. G.–J. B.'s sonnets,-My Cradle;---and the Nettle; -are intended for our next.

The paper on the plurality of worlds is too loose and incorrect for our purpose.

We beg Mr. BASDEN to accept our acknowledgments for his letter, and ai the same time we request a continuance of his favours.- V. F. F. is always acceptable.

To our fair correspondent who writes from the“ Banks of the Ouse,” we give it as our opinion that she can write well: if her compositions were rather less desultory, we think they would be improved, and very acceptable to the readers of the NORTHERN STAR.

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ANCIENT MANSION AT HIGH-SUNDERLAND, NEAR HALIFAX.

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To the Editors of the Northern Star. WITH the drawing of the House at High-Sunderland, communicated by a friend, it will perhaps be interesting to your readers to have the following extraots from “ The History and Antiquities of the Parish of Halifax, &c. by the Rev. John Watson, M.A.” 4to. London, 1775.

High-Sunderland (situated about a mile north of Halifax, between the Bradford and Wakefield roads) was so called, as being, perhaps in ancient times, a farm which the Anglo-Saxons called by the name of Sunder or Sundor-lond; or it might be separated or set apart for some particular purpose or privilege, the knowledge of which is now lost; for in that case they would give it this name, as being sundered or divided from the lands about it. It is called High because situated at the top of a hill.

“ When the present fabric at High-Sunderland was erected, does not appear by any inscription upon the building, but it was either the work of Richard Sunderland, who married Susan Saltonstall, about 1597, or of his son Abraham, who married Elizabeth Langdale ; but more probably the latter, because we meet with the arms of Saltonstall and Langdale, impaled with those of Sunderland, in the windows. This house seems once to have been well ornamented; there are still some statues and busts remaining of tolerable workmanship. In a chamber-window, under the arms of Saltonstall, Langdale, and Thornhill, of Fixby,-

Fælix quem virtus generosa exornat avorum,

Et qui virtute suis adjicit ipse decus. L. S.* These letters, L. S., stand för Langdale, Sunderland, but I think them not so old as the house, because in another place the arms of Saltonstall and Langdale (as above) are impaled with those of Sunderland, which would belong to this Langdale's father to do. This Langdale also appears to have lived a good part of his time at Coley-hall, and to have sold the estate so late

Happy is he whom the illustrious virtue of his ancestors adorns, and who, by his own virtue, adds lustre to theirs.

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