Speeches in Parliament, of the Right Honourable William Windham: To which is Prefixed, Some Account of His Life, Volumen2

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Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, 1812

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Página 68 - Haec ubi dicta, cavum conversa cuspide montem impulit in latus ; ac venti, velut agmine facto, qua data porta, ruunt et terras turbine perflant. incubuere mari, totumque a sedibus imis 85 una Eurusque Notusque ruunt creberque procellis Africus, et vastos volvunt ad litora fluctus.
Página 45 - revolutionary stream ', the Seine, charged with all the colluvies of Paris, — with all the filth and blood of that polluted city, — shall have turned its current into the Thames, that the waters of our fair ' domestic flood ' can remain pure and wholesome, as before ? Do we suppose these things can happen ? Or is it that we are indifferent whether they happen or not ; and that the morals of the country are no longer any object of our concern ? Sir, I fear, the very scenes that we shall witness,...
Página 35 - ... does, at this moment, swim the ocean. Is this a state of things to be lightly hazarded ? Does the hope of bettering this condition, even in the minds of those most sanguine, so much outweigh the fear of injuring it, that these opposite chances can, upon the whole, be stated otherwise than as destroying each other ; and that of consequence, in the comparison of War and Peace, the prospect of increased industry and commerce, which in general tells so much in favour of Peace, must not here be struck...
Página 51 - ... what those securities were ; or when we ought to have taken up with such securities, if securities they can be called, as are offered by the present treaty. The great misfortune has been, that this question of Peace has never yet been fully and fairly before the country. We have been taken up with the War ; that was the side of the alternative next to us ; — and have never yet, till it was too late, had our attention fairly directed, or, I must say, fairly summoned, to the dreadful picture...
Página 50 - O any discussions which might take place between us, in time of peace. The dangers of peace, therefore, are augmented a hundredfold by terms at once so degrading and injurious, as those to which we have submitted : on any terms on which it could have been concluded, it would have had its dangers, and dreadful ones too ; France remaining a revolutionary government, and being, as it is, in possession of Europe. Whether...
Página 33 - ... brought upon friends and families ; the loss of money, meaning, by that, money expended in a way not to be beneficial to the country that raises it ; and the loss of money in another sense, that is to say, money not got ; by which I mean the interruption given to national industry, and the diminution of the productions thence arising, either by the number of hands withdrawn from useful labour, (which is probably, however, but little material,) or by the embarrassments and restraints which in...
Página 124 - His own general opinion on this head, he could not better describe, than in some lines which gentlemen might have seen on Inn windows and shutters, where the writer, speaking of the faults of men and women, and allowing that many faults...
Página 391 - Services, and also for such further Period as His Majesty shall please to direct, not to exceed in any Case Three Years, and to determine whenever Six Months shall have elapsed of continued Peace subsequent to the Expiration of the Term of [Seven, or Ten, or Twelve] Years...
Página 50 - In general, though terms, however advantageous, would not secure us against the mischiefs of French fraternity, and the infusions of French principles and morals, yet they would make a little difference, I apprehend, as to the effect which Peace would produce in the feelings of Europe ; as to the air of success and triumph which it would give to the enemy, and of defeat and humiliation, which it would impress upon us ; as to the consequences resulting from thence, even with respect to the propagation...

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