Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

WONDERFUL SPRINGS.

which he set up his own instead, with ascribed to be the forerunners of war, the following lines underit:

famine, pestilences, &c. &c.) for as those Kings' heads are hung up for a sign,

chronicles testify, there were much strife And many a saint's; then why not mine?

and dissention stirred up between Henry the Third and the lords of his kingdom ;

for the very next year England was Pornponius Mela, in his account of the Canary or Fortunate Isles, gives an

wasted by fire and sword from Wales to account of two wonderful springs, the Salisbury, which town was hurnt soon water of one is of such a quality that it after, attended with a great drought and causes those who drink of it to die laugh. Suns made their appearance but the day

pestilence. Also in the year 1460, three ing; whilst the reverse is the nature of before the three Earls Edward Earl of the other, which is the only remedy to heal those who have drank of the first; the Earl of Wiltshire, fought the great

March, with the Earl of Pembroke, and so that the bad qualities of the one are

battle at Mortimer's Cross, as Stow af counterbalanced by the virtues of the firmeth, in which the Earl of March put other. Pomp. Mela, lib.3, cap. ii; and the others to flight, with a great destrucalso Petrarch, in one of his canzonets ;

tion of their soldiers. Two more in Ne l'isole famose di Fortuna

stances are also chronicled: one by Fulk Due fonti hai; chi di l'una,

in his Meteors, who says, that in the year Bee moi ridendo ; e chi de l'altra scampa. 1526, towards the slaughter of Lewis

Canz. 18. st. 6. the Second, King of Hungary, three MOCK SUNS.

suns marched forth. The second inLanguet and Stow relate, in their stance is told by Inemond, who saith, Chronicles, that in the year 1233, upon that in the year 1619, were three also the 7th of April, four suns were seen be- seen at Lovain, in the month of May, ac sides the natural sun, (which, in those sun-rising. days of ignorance and superstition, were

ORIGINAL POETRY,

sneer.

THE SAINTS.

“ Hark! already I hear, with terrified ear,

“ The church is in danger! new Cromwella A PARODY,

are near ! Sung at a Public Meeting of Friends to a Repeal " For all the Dissenters are learning to yoke of the Penal Laws respecting Religion. “ The palm of Religion with Liberty's oak." 1.

III. T° the angel of England, who sat in high

“ Thy creed, Athanasius, these men dis

avow, glee,

“ And the Thirty-nine Articles read with a The sound Nonconformists addrest a petition, To beg he'd inspire mother Church them to

“ The episcopal bench will be tenantless free

now; From the tests that dishonour the holy reli.

". And the biforked mitre a fool's-cap appear. gion.

" My thunders, no fear on't, shall soon da "My permission you have," was the answer

their errand,

“ I'll hurl them red-hot at bold Priestley, I “ But such favors as those of the Saints you

warrant, must crave,

" And scare his fierce crew, for thus daring " And I wish you success in attempting to

to yoke, yoko

“ The palm of Religion with Liberty's oak." “ The palm of Religion with Liberty's oak.”

IV.
II.

The yellow-haird Andrew then said : “Ps'yThe news thro' Empyreum incontinent few:

thee cease, When old Peter pretended to give himself - Thou high-priest of the Saints, such vile

vociferation. « If these mortals are suffer'd their scheme “ Presbyterians in England, 'tis true, you may to pursue,

tease ; " There can't be a bierarcby left below “ But in Scotland you cannot deny them salstairs.

vation.

Therg

he gave,

airs :

* There over each head is a covenant « Bow, humbly bow, before that God spread,

" Whose goodness crowns thy feeting " And my sons from your firebrands no mis. days, chief shall dread;

" Who, when he lifts the chastening rod, « But at leisure proceed in contriving to

“ A father's tenderest love displays. yoke

“ Yet, complaining mortal, say, The palm of Religion with Liberty's oak."

“6 Art thou left a hopeless prey,

“ To sorrow, care, or torturing pain ! v.

“ What! is every pleasure fled, Next Patrick arose with his risible phiz:

Every comfort cold, or dead, By my shoul! brave Saint Andrew, I'm all “ And will they never bloom again!

of your mind. « Saint George is a fool, if he care for this Oh! cease thou faithful monitor within,

Nor rend this weak deluded heart ; quiz.

Low in the dust I mourn my sin, « My test-acts I gave long ago to the wind. “ Come, Saint George, be not jealous of And long to see its bated form depart. these honest fellows;

Ungrateful wretch ! have not mine eyes " Low churchmen are safer than such as are

Beheld with anguish and surprise zealous :

The deathly pallid cheek, the dim sunk eyes « Their bigoted bishops unwillingly yoke

Wildly upraised in speechless agony? " The palm of Religion with Liberty's oak."

Has not my startled car shrunk from the

gron VI.

That, rushing from the heart, appalled my

own ; “ My lads," quoth Saint George, “ all the while I was young

And listened with unfeign'd distress “ Saint Peter and I remain'd very good

To the sad tale of human wretchedness? friends :

Oh! could I then indulge a murmuring sigh? " 'Tis true we'd a quarrel, two centuries Did selfish sorrow then sustuse mine eye?

Ah no! the tear that trickled down my agone,

cheek “ But, by pleasing him now, I shall make him

Proclaim'd the gratitude no words could amends. “When the Pepe was in fashion, I laugh 'd at

speak, the passion ;

Then stretch thy thoughts abroad, my gro“ Now that others desert him I yearn with

velling mind, compassion;

These strong incitements still remain : “ And, like him, will oppose every sect that Call up to view the miseries of mankind,

would yoke “The palm of Religion with Liberty's cak." Explore the wretched haunts of grief and pain;

And let the ilis thy fellow-men endure,

Be to each murmuring thought a sovereiga However, my friends, let os join hand in hand,

Enough! ’ris done! I need no more ! Preserve unanimity, tolerance, and love :

The doleful scenes one rapid glance surveys, 'Tis ours to support what's so happily plann'd; Constrain my humbled spirit to adore Perseverance will win, tho' the great disap- 'The God whose goodness claims my highest prove.

praise. While thus we agree, our toast let it be,

Yes! I would praise Him till my latest May every fashion of worship be free,

breath, • And Catholic, Jew, and Dissenter, all yoke My better thoughts condemin desponding 1 The palm of Religion with Liberty's pak.”

sighs ; And when I sink within the arms of Death,

My nobler praise shall mount the lofty THOUGHTS ON LIFE.

skies. IN IRREGULAR VERSE.-PART 11.

What though my humble name SAY'ST thou, short-sighted, sinful man! Will never to the world be known; In sad complaint, 'Oh what is life?"

And far from grandeur, power, or fame, “ Must Heaven's all-wise, all-gracious The vale of life I pass alone ; plan,

I covet not the splendour of the great, “ To calm thy soul's unlawful strife, Nor sigh to join the world's most favor'd Be sent by seraphs from the skies,

throng; " And all unveil'd before thy wondring eyes! No vain desires their blazon'd names create, “ Vain, impious wish! thy feeble sight Their gay parade unenvied moves along ;

“ Wouid shrink before the bright de- Alas ! they strive for gilded toys,
sign;

That prove too oft a treacherous soare; fr Whelm'd by the dazzling flood of light, The best delights, the sweetest joys, $ That stộcams from each sefulgent line, Thrive in a mild, a purer air.

Take

cure.

WONDERFUL SPRINGS.

which he set up his own instead, with ascribed to be the forerunners of war, the following lines underit:

famine, pestilences, &c. &c.) for as those Kings' heads are hung up for a sign,

chronicles testify, there were much strife And many a saint's; then why not mine?

and dissention stirred up between Henry

the Third and the lords of his kingdom ; Pomponius Mela, in his account of wasted by fire and sword from Wales to

for the very next year England was the Canary or Fortunate Isles, gives an account of two wonderful springs, the Salisbury, which town was burnt soon water of one is of such a quality that it after, attended with a great drought and causes those who drink of it to die laugh

pestilence. Also in the year 1460, three ing; whilst the reverse is the nature of before the three Earls Edward Earl of

suns made their appearance but the day the other, which is the only remedy to heal those who have drank of the first; the Earl of Wiltshire, fought the great

March, with the Earl of Pembroke, and so that the bad qualities of the one arc

battle at Mortimer's Cross, as Stow afcounterbalanced by the virtues of the firmeth, in which the Earl of March put other. Pomp. Mela, lib. 3, cap. ii; and the others to flight, with a great destrucalso Petrarch, in one of his canzonets ;

tion of their soldiers. Two more inNe l'isole famose di Fortuna

stances are also chronicled: one by Fulk Due fonti hai; chi di l'unia,

in his Meteors, who says, that in the year Bee noi ridendo ; e chi de l'altra scampa. 1526, towards the slaughter of Lewis

Canz. 18. st. 6.

the Second, King of Hungary, three

suns marched forth. The second inLanguet and Stow relate, in their stance is told by Inemond, who saith, Chronicles, that in the year 1233, upon that in the year 1619, were three also the 7th of April, four suns were seen he- seen at Lovain, in the month of May, at sides the natural sun, (which, in those sun-rising. days of ignorance and superstition, were

MOCK SUNS.

ORIGINAL POETRY,

Sneer.

THE SAINTS.

“ Hark! already I hear, with terrified ear,

“ The church is in danger! new Cromwella A PARODY,

are near ! Sung at a Public Meeting of Friends to a Repeal " For all the Dissenters are learning to yoke of the Penal Laws respecting Religion. " The palm of Religion with Liberty's oak." I.

III.

" Thy creed, Athanasius, these men disTo the angel of England, who sat in high

avow, glee, The sound Nonconformists addrest a petition,

" And the Thirty-nine Articles read with a To beg he'd inspire mother Church chein to free

“ The episcopal bench will be tenantleșs

now; From the tests that dishonour the holy reli

66 And the biforked mitre a fool's.cap appear. gion. “My permission you have," was the answer

" My thunders, no fear on't, shall soon da

their errand,

« I'll hurl them red-hot at bold Priestley, I “ But such favors as those of the Saints you

warrant, niust crave, " And I wish you success in attempting to

“ And scare his fierce crew, for thus daring

to yoke, yoke “ The palm of Religion with Liberty's oak."

“ The palm of Religion with Liberty's oak.”

IV.
II.

The yellow-hair'd Andrew then said : “Priy-
The news thro' Empyreum incontinent fiew: thee cease,
When old Peter pretended to give himself " Thou high-priest of the Saints, such vile

vociferation. " If these mortals are suffer'd their scheme « Presbyterians in England, 'tis true, you may to pursue,

tease; " There can't be a hierarchy left below " But in Scotland you cannot deny them salstairs,

vation.

There

he gave,

airs :

V.

46 Tbere over each head is a covenant Bow, humbly bow, before that God spread,

“ Whose goodness crowns thy fleeting “ And my sons from your firebrands no mis

days, chief shall dread;

" Who, when he lifts the chastening rod, • But at leisure proceed in contriving to

“ A father's tenderest love displays. yoke

“ Yet, complaining mortal, say, « The palm of Religion with Liberty's oak."

" Art thou left a hopeless prey,

« To sorrow, care, or torturing pain !

“ What! is every pleasure filed, Next Patrick arose with his risible phiz :

Every comfort cold, or dead, " By my shoul! brave Saint Andrew, I'm all " And will they never bloom again!"

of your mind. « Saint George is a fool, if he care for this Oh! cease thou faithful monitor within,

Nor rend this weak deluded heart; quiz.

Low in the dust I mourn my sin, « My test-acts I gave long ago to the wind. “ Come, Saine George, de not jealous of And long to see its bated form depart. these honest fellows;

Ungrateful wretch ! have not mine eyes * Low churchmen are safer than such as are

Beheld with anguish and surprise zealous :

The deathly pallid cheek, the dim sunk eyes « Their bigoted bishops unwillingly yoke

Wildly upraised in speechless agony? “ The palm of Religion with Liberty's oak."

Has not my startled ear shrunk from the

groA VI.

That, rushing from the heart, appallid my

own ; My lads," quoth Saint George, “ all the while I was young

And listened with unfeign'd distress Saint Peter and I remain’d very good

To the sad tale of human wretchedness? friends :

Oh! could I then indulge a murmuring sigh? “ 'Tis true we'd a quarrel, two centuries Did selfish sorrow then suspuse mine eye?

Ab no! the tear that trickled down my agone,

cheek “ But, by pleasing him now, I shall make him

Proclaim'd the gratitude no words could amends. “When the Pope was in fashion, I laugh'd at

speak, the passion ;

Then stretch thy thoughts abroad, my gro“ Now that others desert him I yearn with

velling mind, compassion;

These strong incitements still remain : “ And, like him, will oppose every sect that Call up to view the miseries of mankind,

would yoke The palm of Religion with Liberty's cak." Explore the wretched haunts of grief and pain;

And let the ills thy fellow-men endure,

Be to each murmuring thought a sovereiga However, my friends, let us join hand in hand,

Enough! ’zis done! I need no more! Preserve unanimity, tolerance, and love :

The doleful scenes one rapid glance surveys, 'Tis ours to support what's so happily plann'd;

Constrain my humbled spirit to adore Perseverance will win, tho' the great disap- 'The God whose goodness claims my highest

prove. While thus we agree, our toast let it be,

Yes! I would praise Him till my latest May every fashion of worship be free,

breath, • And Catholic, Jew, and Dissenter, all yoke My better thoughts condemn desponding $ The palm of Religion with Liberty's pak."

sighs ; And when I sink within the arms of Death,

My nobler praise shall mount the lofty THOUGHTS ON LIFE.

skies. IN IRREGULAR VERSE.-PART 11.

What though my humble name SAY'ST thou, short-sighted, sinful man ! Will never to the world be known ; In sad complaint, 'Oh what is life?"

And far from grandeur, power, or fame, “ Must Heaven's all-wise, all.gracious The vale of life I pass alone ; plan,

I covet not the splendour of the great, “ To calm thy soul's unlawful strife, Nor sigh to join the world's most favor'd " Be sent by seraphs from the skies,

throng; “And all unveil'd before thy wondring eyes? No vain desires their blazon'd names create, " Vain, impious wish! thy feeble sight Their gay parade unenvied moves along ;

“ Would shrink before the bright de- Alas! they strive for gilded toys,
sign;

That prove coo oft a treacherous soare; " Whelm'd by the dazzling flood of light, The best delights, the sweetest joys, “That streams from cach refulgent line, Thrive in a mild, a purer air.

Take

cure.

sin;

Take then, ye votaries to the world's ap- Inestimable book ! to mortals given, plause,

In wondrous love, to point the road to HeaTake all the fame that empires can bestow;

ven! Pure from a richer source my spirit draws Whether in joy or grief, to thee I owe Miore lasting joys the balm for every woe. The choicest comforts I possess below. Who gives the sparrow skill to fly, When travelling in Afflictio 's darksome road, And frolic in the yielding air?

On! how it cheers my beart to hear chee Who hears the unfledged raves cry,

say, And feeds them with parental care ? " Cast all thy weighty burden on thy God; Delightful thought ! The same almighty

“ He will sustain thce, He will guide chy

way." power, With watchful care my varied path at.

And when oppress'd by grief, to find tends;

My thoughts so much in love with And in the noontide or the midnight hour,

When doubts and fears distract my mind, My teeble soul from every ill defends.

And shame and darkness reign withis. Then what is life? A sacred voice declares, Blest source of comfort ! then I fly, Taught by the truth. illumin'd page :

Anxious to hear thy soul-seviving voice, It soorbes ny spirit in a wo:ld of cares; That tells me Jesus left the worlds on high, It curbs my fiery passions, wildest rage. And died, that sinful mortals might rejoice! Be still, my heart, hush ali chy sorrows, Yes, while on earth through his forgiving Every accent speaks to thee :

love, Mark ! oh mark, from whence it borrows

In glorious hope of endless joys above.
Each divinely.cheering truthi,
To guide thy frail and wandering Oh tis enough! here would my spirit rest,
youth,

And bid life's changing seasons roll along; To seats of endless bliss and purity.

These srcred truths compose my trouble • Dare a living man complain,

breast, « Man, whose sins the stars Outnumber!

And will inspire my last triumphant song. “ Does he hope by day to gain

Ah! then no more my restless heart, “ Pieasures never mix'd with pain,

Indulge one anxious, wishful sigh: " And free from care by night to slumber?

With cheerful hope perform thy part ; « Ah fool! for thee in dread array

And look for perfect bliss beyond the sky. • The keenese disappointments wait :

This mortal frame must soon decay : " This lire is but a thorny way,

Soon the messenger will come " To lead the pilgrim to a happier state.

From realms of never clouded day,

To lead me home! “ Forward, to the awful goal 6. Say, frail mortal, canst thou look ;

Then will this paintul conflict cease,

And all the ills I now deplore :
" And firmly rest chy feeble soul,
« On some great promise in the sacred book ?

Then will my spirit rest in peace,
Cans't thou to the world above,

A prey to grief and sin no more.

ALBERT. « Lift a humble, steadfast eye ;

Trowbridge, Wilts. * Assured the God of boundless love, " Will be on earth thy friend, thy bliss in

TO MARY. realms on high? " Then art thou rich beyond expression,

WHEN sad reflection me oppresses,

I find relief in my distresses, “ Firm as the storm-beat rock thy soul may

By thinking of my Mary ; rest;

Whose virtues glisten in my eyes, « Life to thee is worth possession,

Like to the stars that gem the skies, “ Alike in joy or sorrow thou art blest !"

Whose splendours never vary.
Yes, with my lips, my heart shall raise,
To thee my thanktul, noblest praise,

In her I find those manners sweet,
Great source of happiness divine;

Which render female grace complete,
Thy power supports my fainting soul; No pertness e'er assuming;
Thy cheering words my fears controul,

Her soothing language gently flows,
And to 'Thy will my all I would resign.

Each accent with true knowledge glows,

She's like the lily blooming, Let the proud sceptic with sarcastic sneer, Contemn those truths the best of mon revere ; Oh could I then this fair one move, Let him assault with all his puny rage To feel the gentle frame of love, The word of life, the heaven-indited page : 'Twould soothe a passion tender ; But when my hands che sacred leaves unfold, "Twould rid me of all earthly strife, In every line my wondering eyes behold My heart, my hand, my all, through life, The brightest, strongest, evidences shine

To Mary I'd surrender. To prove the glorious author most divine.

EDGAR.

« AnteriorContinuar »