Rosamund Gray: Recollections of Christ's Hospital, Etc. Etc

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Edward Moxon, 1835 - 356 páginas
 

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Página 116 - And made myself a motley to the view. **!!** O, for my sake, do you with Fortune chide, The guilty goddess of my harmful deeds, That did not better for my life provide Than public means which public manners breeds. Thence comes it that my name receives a brand ; And almost thence my nature is subdued To what it works in, like the dyer's hand.
Página 234 - But man is a noble animal, splendid in ashes, and pompous in the grave, solemnizing nativities and deaths with equal lustre, nor omitting ceremonies of bravery in the infamy of his nature.
Página 176 - I have read of a bird, which hath a face like, and yet will prey upon, a man : who coming to the water to drink, and finding there by reflection, that he had killed one like himself, pineth away by degrees, and never afterwards enjoyeth itself, f Such is in some sort the condition of Sir Edward.
Página 180 - Thus this brook has conveyed his ashes into Avon, Avon into Severn, Severn into the narrow seas, they into the main ocean; and thus the ashes of Wickliffe are the emblem of his doctrine, which now is dispersed all the world over.
Página 125 - What we see upon a stage is body and bodily action ; what we are conscious of in reading is almost exclusively the mind and its movements : and this, I think, may sufficiently account for the very different sort of delight with which the same play so often affects us in the reading and the seeing.
Página 159 - He would have made a great epic poet, if indeed he has not abundantly shown himself to be one ; for his Homer is not so properly a translation as the stories of Achilles and Ulysses re-written.
Página 103 - It seemed to embody and realize conceptions which had hitherto assumed no distinct shape. But dearly do we pay all our life after for this juvenile pleasure, this sense of distinctness. When the novelty is past, we find to our cost that instead of realizing an idea, we have only materialized and brought down a fine vision to the standard of flesh and blood.
Página 133 - Specimens of English Dramatic Poets who lived about the time of Shakspeare...
Página 100 - Wide o'er this breathing world, a Garrick came. Though sunk in death the forms the Poet drew, The Actor's genius bade them breathe anew; Though, like the bard himself, in night they lay, Immortal Garrick call'd them back to day: And till ETERNITY with power sublime, Shall mark the mortal hour of hoary TIME, SHAKSPEARE and GARRICK like twin stars shall shine, And earth irradiate with a beam divine. It would be an insult to my readers' understandings to attempt any thing like a criticism on this farrago...
Página 115 - Hamlet is made to shew, is no counterfeit, but the real face of absolute aversion, - of irreconcileable alienation. It may be said he puts on the madman; but then he should only so far put on this counterfeit lunacy as his own real distraction will give him leave; that is, incompletely, imperfectly; not in that confirmed, practised way, like a master of his art, or as Dame Quickly would say, "like one of those harlotry players.

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