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Libros Libros 1 - 10 de 28 sobre Great, verily, was the glory of the English tongue (An.-Sax.) before the Norman Conquest,...
" Great, verily, was the glory of the English tongue (An.-Sax.) before the Norman Conquest, in this, that the Old English could express most aptly all the conceits of the mind in their own tongue, without borrowing from any. "
A history of England in the lives of Englishmen - Página 273
por George Godfrey Cunningham - 1853
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A Dictionary of the English Language: In which the Words are ..., Volumen1

Samuel Johnson - 1805
...anchor and holi!.'] The hold or fastness of the anchor ; and, figuratively, security. The old English could express most aptly all the conceits of the mind in their own tongue, without borrowing from any ; as for example : the holy service of God, which the Latins called rrliriau, because it knitted the...
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Rudiments of a Grammar of the Anglo-Saxon Tongue

Joseph Gwilt - 1829 - 56 páginas
...Great verily was the glory of our Tongue before the Norman Conquest, in this, that " the old English could express most aptly, all the conceits of the...in their own " Tongue, without borrowing from any." CiMDBN's REMAINS. LONDON : WILLIAM PICKERING. M.DCCC.XXIX. TO CHARLES GEORGE YOUNG, ESQUIRE, YORK HERALD,...
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The Gentleman's Magazine, Volumen103,Parte1;Volumen153

1833
...(which may indeed yet be said of its original German) could express most aptly all the conceptions of the mind, in their own tongue, without borrowing from any." A mixture of the dialects of the Old English, the Teutonic, Saxon, German, and Norman French, now constitutes...
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Biblical Repository and Classical Review

1837
...GREAT verily was the glory of our tongue before the Norman conquest, in this, that the old English could express most aptly, all the conceits of the mind in their own tongue, without borrowing from.any." * From the Anglo-Saxons are derived the names of the most ancient officers in England, of...
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A Glossary of Wiltshire Words: A Glossary of Provincial Words and Phrases in ...

John Yonge Akerman - 1842 - 60 páginas
...Great, verily, was the glory of our tongue before the Norman Conquest, in this, that the Old English could express most aptly all the conceits of the mind in their own tongue without borrowing from any." — Camderi•s Remainei, p. 25, edit. 1636. PREFACE. " THE etymologist," says Cornelius Agrippa in...
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A Glossary of Provincial Words and Phrases in Use in Wiltshire

John Yonge Akerman - 1842 - 60 páginas
...Great, verily, was the glory of our tongue before the Norman Conquest, in this, that the Old English could express most aptly all the conceits of the mind in their own tongue without borrowing from any.''—Camden's Remaines, p. 25, edit. 1636. < PREFACE. " THE etymologist," says Cornelius Agrippa...
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The American Biblical Repository, Volumen10

1837
...GREAT verily was the glory of our tongue before the Norman conquest, in this, that the old English could express most aptly, all the conceits of the...in their own tongue, without borrowing from any." * From the Anglo-Saxons are derived the names of the most ancient officers in England, of the greater...
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The English Language in Its Elements and Forms: With a History of Its Origin ...

William Chauncey Fowler - 1851 - 659 páginas
...verily, was the glory of the English tongue before the Norman conquest, in this that the Old English could express most aptly all the conceits of the mind in their own tongue, without borrowing from any. For example, the holy service of God, which the Latins call religio, because it knitteth the minds...
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Sunday reading, conducted by J. Kitto

John Kitto - 1853
...righteous and the fields of sinners. — Dr. Jeremy Taylor. THE old English people could express more aptly all the conceits of the mind in their own tongue, without borrowing from any. As, for example, the holy service of God, which the Latins called religion, because it knitted the...
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English Grammar: The English Language in Its Elements and Forms. With a ...

William Chauncey Fowler - 1855 - 754 páginas
...the glory of the English tongue (An.-Sax.) before the Norman Conquest, in this, that the Old English could express most aptly all the conceits of the mind in their own tongue, without borrowing from any. For example, the holy service of God, which the Latins call religio, because it knitteth the minds...
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