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flat."

* If that, when I was mistress of myself,

And in my way of youth, pure and untainted,
The emperor had vouchsafed, &c."

Roman Actor, 1.c. in my youth.

" So much nobler

Shall be your way of justice.Thierry and Theodoret. ie. your justice. " Thus ready for the way of death or life, I wait the sharpest blow.”

Pericles, i.e. for death or life.

“ If all the art I have or power can do it,

He shall be found, and such a way of justice
Inflicted on him!”

Queen of Corinth. i.c. such justice.

“ Probably,” say the editors, “ we should read weight of justice ; way

is

very “ If we can wipe out

The way of your offences, we are yours, sir.” Valentinian. i. e. your offences. To wipe out the way,” the same editors again remark," seems a strange phrase ; stain, we apprehend, will be allow. ed a better word : yet we should not have substituted it,” (they actually foist it into the text) “had we not been persuaded that the old reading was corrupt.”! And thus our best poets are edited!

• It is unnecess :ry io proceed any further :-indeed I should have been satisfied with fewer examples, had not my.respect for Shakspeare made me desirous of disencumbering his page, by ascertaining beyond the possibility of cavil, the meaning of an expression so long and 80 laboriously agitated. To return to Macbeth: the sere and yellow leaf is the cominencement of the winter of life or of old age; to this he has attained, and he laments, in a strain of inimitable pathos and beauty, that it is unaccompanied by those blessings which render it supportable. As his manhood was without virtue, so he has now before niin the certain prospect of an old age without honour.'

On a passage in The Fatal Dowry, (Act 2. Sc. 2.) we have this note :

you shall see him in the morning in the Galley-foist, at noon in the Bullion, in the evening in Quirpo, &c.] I know not what to make of this passage. Mr. M. Mason thinks the places here men. tioned were taverns ; it is full as likely that they were houses of pub. lick resort for some kind of amusement, Our old writers give the name of galley foist to the lord mayor's barge ; but I see not how this, or any other of the city barges, can be mcant here. Bullions are noticed by Jonson ; and in a manner that seems to determine them Lo be receptacles for thieves or gamblers :

“ While you do eat, and lie about the town here,
And cozen in your Bullions."

The Devil's an Ass. Of Quirpo I can find no mention, and am therefore compelled ta leave it, with the rest, to the reader's better judgment.'

Both Mr. M. Mason and Mr. Gifford are probably mistaken here, We think that these are neither taverns nor places of public resort, but the names of the different dresses which were put on this dressing block. The

resort,

passage runs thus : “ The other is his dressing block, upon whom my lord lays all his clothes and fashions ere he vouchsafes them his own person : you shall see him in the morning in the Galley-foist, at noon in the Bullion, in the evening in Quirpo, and all night in"-"a bawdy-house" - says Malotin, interrupting the former speaker. What the galley-foist was, we do not know: perhaps, some morning dress. The bullion was probably the rich or laced suit, an idea which the quotation from Jonson rather favours; and even now the rich pendant parts of the epaulette and of some other laced ornaments are called bullions : in the evening, the Block was again stripped of this, and reduced to his close jacket, the Quirpo or Cuerpo, and was thus in a state of preparation to pass the remainder of the night in the place to which Malotin dismisses bim.

On some occasions, Mr. Gifford leaves bis author's mean. ing obscure where a very slight alteration would render him intelligible. Such is a passage in The Bondsman, Act 5. Sc.

3 Is my high birth a blemish ? Or does my wealth, which all the vain expence Cf women cannot waste, breed loathing in you,

I he honours I can call my own thoughts, scandals ?" The last line we would read thus,

• The honours I can call my own, thought scandals :?" Again, in The Picture, Act 1. Sc. I. ** Włiile you, to whose sweet innocence both Indies

Compared are of no valuc, wanting these

Pass unregarded
Sophia.---If I am so rich, or

In your opinion, why should you borrow

Additions for me?" What is the or here? Either it is superfluous, or the phrase is elliptical, and some other words are omitted; as "oram so.”.

Although we perfectly agree with Mr. Gifford that, in some of the editions of our old poets, particularly Shakspeare, the volumes are overloaded with useless notes, we cannot avoid thinking that he has run into an opposite extreme, and has been too sparing of information where it was really required. Expressions and allusions frequently occur in Massinger, which, though clear to those who are versed in the writings of our old poets, may require to be explained to others. Such, perhaps, are the following:

“ To take A say of venison or stale fowl.” Unnatural Combat. that is, assay-to make an examination or tryal of it,

* I am jelly within already, and without
Embroidered all o'er with statute lace."

Parliament of Love.
* If you've a suit, sher water ; I am blind else.”

Maid of Honour. “ I will not have you feed like the hangman of Flushing

Alone, while I am here." New Way to pay old Debts. Was it peculiar to the hangman of Flushing to feed alone? " When a young lady wrings you by the hand, thus,

Or with an amorous touch presses your foots
Looks babies in your eyes," &c.

Renegado. With regard to this passage, Mr. Gifford perhaps thought that the readers of Massinger would not be at a loss for the meaning of the metaphorical expression, Looks babies in your eyes; or perhaps he chose not to attempt any explanation of it. It may indeed be considered by many connoisseurs in these amorous glances, as sufficiently obvious that Massinger here meant an invitation to that mysterious intercourse which the appearance of little tell-tales would afterward explain: but the words have been considered by others as alluding to those looks in which the Lover traces the miniature of himself in the pupil of his mistress's eye; and on this idea we recollect that a literary friend of ours composed a few stanzas, in which he has made a neat and, we think, a poetical allusion to this expression :

“Oh Lady, from whose lips the swectest sounds,

F’er modulated yet by female tongue,
Have minister'd so kindly to Love's wounds,
Soothing the torture from themselves that sprung ;
Oh Lady, have those lips, whose lightest touch
Thrilled bliss excatic, more than verse e'er sung,
Have they, oh Lady, changed their truth so much
To coldly utter--I no more am young!
Oh no! th’inviting smile that o'er them plays,
Their dewy fragrance, scenting the soft sigh,
Tell me I sin not as I fondly gaze
To read my sentence in that half-raised eye!
Oh no, I still am young-I see it plain –

I glow, an infant in your eyes again!” We cannot close our review of this edition of Massinger's Plays, without expressing our obligations to Mr. Gifford for the pains which, in particular, he has bestowed on The Parliament Of Love; a comedy now first printed from a manuscript in the possession of Mr. Malone. This is certainly a piece of great merit, and cannot be otherwise than applauded, though with commendation requiring numerous and great abatements: the principal of which must be on the score of the

resort, but the names of the different dresses which were put on this dressing block. The passage runs thus : “ The other is his dressing block, upon whom my lord lays all his clothes and fashions ere he vouchsafes them his own person : you shall sce him in the morning in the Galley-foist, at noon in the Bullion, in the evening in Quirpo, and all night in"-"a bawdy-house" - says Malotin, interrupting the former speaker. What the galLeg-foist was, we do not know: perhaps, some morning dress. The bellion was probably the rich or laced suit, an idea which the quotation from Jonson rather favours; and even now the rich pendant parts of the epaulette and of some other laced ornaments are called bullions : in the evening, the Block was again stripped of this, and reduced to his close jacket, the Quirpo or Cuerpo, and was thus in a state of preparation to pass the remainder of the night in the place to which Malotin dismisses bim.

On some occasions, Mr. Gifford leaves bis author's meaning obscure where a very slight alteration would render him intelligible. Such is a passage in The Bondsman, Act 5. Sc. 3.

“ Is my high birth a blemish ? Or does my wealth, which all the vain expence Cf women cannot waste, breed loathing in you,

I he honours I can call my own thoughts, scandals ?" The last line we would read thus,

• The honours I can call my own, thought scandals ?" Again, in The Picture, Act 1. Sc. I. * Właile you, to whose sweet innocence both Indies

Compared are of no value, wanting these

Pass unregarded
Sophia. If I am so rich, or

In your opinion, why should you borrow

Additions for me?" What is the or here? Either it is superfluous, or the phrase is elliptical, and some other words are omitted; asmor am so.".

Although we perfectly agree with Mr. Gifford that, in some of the editions of our old poets, particularly Shakspeare, the volumes are overloaded with useless notes, we cannot avoid thinking that he has run into an opposite extreme, and has been too sparing of information where it was really required. Expressions and allusions frequently occur in Massinger, which, though clear to those who are versed in the writings of our old poets, may require to be explained to others. Such, perhaps, are the following:

To take A say of venison or stale fowl." Unnatural Combat. that is, assay-to make an examination or tryal of it.

“ I am

! I am jelly within already, and without
Embroidered all o'er with statute lace."

Parliament of Love. " If you've a suit, sher water ; I am blind else.”

Maid of Honour. “ I will not have you feed like the hangman of Flushing

Alone, while I am here." New Way to pay old Debts. Was it peculiar to the hangman of Flushing to feed alone ? "When a young lady wrings you by the hand, thus,

Or with an amorous touch presses your foot,
Looks babies in your eyes," &c.

Renegado. With regard to this passage, Mr. Gifford perhaps thought that the readers of Massinger would not be at a loss for the meaning of the metaphorical expression, Looks babies in your eyes; or perhaps he chose not to attempt any explanation of it. It may indeed be considered by many connoisseurs in these amorous glances, as sufficiently obvious that Massinger here meant an invitation to that mysterious intercourse which the appearance of little tell-tales would afterward explain : but the words have been considered by others as alluding to those looks in which the Lover traces the miniature of himself in the pupil of his mistress's eye; and on this idea we recollect that a literary friend of ours composed a few stanzas, in which he has made a neat and, we think, a poetical allusion to this expression :

Oh Lady, from whose lips the sweetest sounds,

E’er modulated yet by female tongue,
Have minister's so kindly to Love's wounds,
Soothing the torture from themselves that sprung ;
Oh Lady, have those lips, whose lightest touch
Thrilled bliss excatic, more than verse e'er sung,
Have they, oh Lady, changed their truth so much
To coldly utter-I no more am young!
Oh no! th' inviting smile that o'er them plays,
Their dewy fragrance, scenting the soft sigh,
Tell me I sin not as I fondly gaze
To read my sentence in that half-raised eye!
Oh no, I still am young-I see it plain

I glow, an infant in your eyes again!” We cannot close our review of this edition of Massinger's Plays, without expressing our obligations to Mr. Gifford for the pains which, in particular, he has bestowed on The Parliament of Love; a comedy now first printed from a manuscript in the possession of Mr. Malone. This is certainly a piece of great merit, and cannot be otherwise than applauded, though with commendation requiring numerous and great abatements: the principal of which must be on the score of the

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