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which an image of Christ, or some saint, was painted,

looking upon it as scandalous and dishonourable to religion. 10. Though the second Council of Nice established this image

worship, yet the Council of Francfort, that followed soon after, condemned those fathers for their superstition, and deflecting from the primitive rule.

OBSERVATIONS.

By applying the term worship to the veneration paid by the Catholic church to images, the catechist wishes to insinuate, that by this practice divine adoration is given to created objects. But this is wholly a misrepresentation of the state of the case, which is usually made by Protestant writers, and diametrically opposite to the authoritative decisions of the Catholic church. What is the language of the Council of Trent? Nothing can be more satisfactory and precise on the subject. That venerable synod teaches, “ that the images of Christ, of his Virgin Mother, and of the other saints, are to be had and retained particularly in the churches; and that due honour and veneration are to be given to them; not that any divinity is supposed to reside in them, or any property, for which they should be worshipped ; or that any thing is to be asked of them, or any confidence is to be placed in images, as was done by the Gentiles, who reposed their trust in their idols; but because the honour, which is paid to them, is referred to the objects which they represent; so that by the images which we kiss,

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and before which we uncover our heads and bow down, we adore Christ; and venerate those saints, of whom they exhibit a likeness?.” Such is the explanation of the Council of Trent, which is amply sufficient to convey the Catholic doctrine on the subject, and to remove the coarse and vulgar objections produced by the catechist. Even children are so accurately instructed in this particular, that the answers furnished in the catechism, are calculated to fill our adversaries with that sense of shame, which misrepresentation and falsehood, clearly detected, ought, in every instance, to produce. In the Doway Catechism, (first commandment) in answer to the question, do Catholics pray to images ? it is distinctly said: “No, by no means: we pray before them indeed, to keep us from distractions, 'but not to them; for we know, that they can neither see, hear, nor help us."

The purpose, which the Catholic church has in view, in proposing holy images to the veneration of the faithful, is so simple and obvious, that it would appear difficult to conceive, how any misrepresentation can take place. The catechist and his associates are invariably in the habit of preserving the pictures and images of their absent and departed friends ; and the utmost respect is shown to these inanimate memo

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Byapplying the term we by the Catholic church wishes to insinuate, th adoration is given to · is wholly a misreprese case, which is usually i and diametrically op! decisions of the Cath language of the Cou can be more satisfact ject. That venerabi images of Christ, of h other saints, are to'l larly in the churches veneration are to be divinity is supposed property, for which or that any thing is confidence is to be by the Gentiles, wh idols ; but because them, is referred to . present; so that b

representations of rly exhibited withe Catholic church of Christ and his 0 well explained accurately deliIdren? If the red, on account najesty of the cult, or refuse ord and Re:, and judges

honouring question. entations

may be

und uniii. 5. 1. xxv. 18 et seq.

may be unable to peruse a treatise, ay understand a subject exhibited They contribute to preserve the tractions and roving imaginations .ne of prayer; they become the ous and fervent desires ; and they у tend to promote a holy and laudn to follow those examples, which zly exhibited. i the scrupulous Christian apprene prohibition of a practice, so modified, and so embodied in the ictions of mankind. On the cone veneration to places which God to things which bear a relation to cred subjects, are held up to our sacred oracles, provided always loration, cultus latriæ, be given Moses is told in distinct terms", con thou standest is holy ground. phet, alluding to the veneration rk, exclaims: adore his footstool ; 1. Over the ark of the covenant are directed to be placed ; a brazen le by the divine command, to which ere to direct their view, for the bere* Could all this be enjoined to a oriously prone to idolatry, and shall

· Psalm xcviii. 5, al. xcix.

Num. xxi. 8, 9.

which an image of Christ, or some saint, was painted,

looking upon it as scandalous and dishonourable to religion. 10. Though the second Council of Nice established this image

worship, yet the Council of Francfort, that followed soon after, condemned those fathers for their superstition, and deflecting from the primitive rule.

OBSERVATIONS.

By applying the term worship to the veneration paid by the Catholic church to images, the catechist wishes to insinuate, that by this practice divine adoration is given to created objects. But this is wholly a misrepresentation of the state of the case, which is usually made by Protestant writers, and diametrically opposite to the authoritative decisions of the Catholic church. What is the language of the Council of Trent? Nothing can be more satisfactory and precise on the subject. That venerable synod teaches, “ that the images of Christ, of his Virgin Mother, and of the other saints, are to be had and retained particularly in the churches; and that due honour and veneration are to be given to them ; not that any divinity is supposed to reside in them, or any property, for which they should be worshipped ; or that any thing is to be asked of them, or any confidence is to be placed in images, as was done by the Gentiles, who reposed their trust in their idols ; but because the honour, which is paid to them, is referred to the objects which they represent; so that by the images which we kiss,

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