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The intelligent soul man's distinguishing characteristic, 88. Its supremacy

over the animal mind, 88.

I. The LINES OF DEMARKATION STATED..............

89

Extract from Sharon Turner, 89. What mind has achieved, 89. How far

instinct corresponds, 89. Its limitation, 90. The transcendent greatness

of the soul, 90.

II. INSTINCT PRECEDES BOTH EXPERIENCE AND REASONING..... ...... 90

Illustrated in the appetite for food and its gratification, 90. Examples an-

tedating experience, 91. The newly-hatched turtle making for the water,

91. Selection of plants by graminivorous animals, 92. Darwin's theory

of instinct untenable, 92. The value of instinct, 93.

III. INSTINCT IS NOT INCIPIENT REASON.....

93

The question raised, 93. Views of the ancients, 93. Adherence to natural

tendency, 93. Skill and contrivances of birds, 94. Instinct of fishes, 94.

Of quadrupeds, 95. Of insects, 95. Acts without forethought, 96. No

progress in all the ages, 96. Moves in one line only, 97. Not more dif-

ficult to impart spirit than instinct, 97. Individual animals taught

definite things, 97. No general improvability, 98. The process of im-

provement not handed down, 99. Differences in the quality of instinct,

99. Nature unchanged, 100.

IV. INSTINCT IS WITHOUT FORETHOUGHT

100

Mr. Paley's definition defective, 100. The insect working without inten-

tion, 100. The uses of her manufacture unknown to her, 101. The

beneficent results from a higher source, 101.

V. INSTINCT IS CONTROLLED AND GUIDED BY DIVINE INTELLIGENCE... 101

The presence of intelligence not questioned, 101. The problem of the bee's

cell, 102. God in animal instinct, 102. Mind rising above instinct, 102.

VI. CONCLUDING SUGGESTIONS..

102

1. If mere instinct had been given, there would have been a wonderful waste

of skill and adaptations in the material world, 102. 2. We have here a

distinct intimation of man's dominant relation to the animal creation,

103. 3. The endowment of spirit involves the idea of higher duties and

responsibilities, as well as of higher powers, 104. 4. The endowment of

spirit is accompanied with intimations of man's superior destiny, 104.

VI.

MIND IS INDESTRUCTIBLE AND IMMORTAL.
Sublimity of the idea, 105. What is meant by being naturally immortal,

105. Heritage of all the race, 106.

I. FIRST ARGUMENT FOR THE INDESTRUCTIBILITY OF MIND IS DRAWN

FROM THE ACKNOWLEDGED INDESTRUCTIBILITY OF MATTER

Matter incessantly changing, 106. It is only transformation, 106. No atom

ever ceases to be, 107. Annihilation no part of the plan of the Creator,

107. Presumption for the indestructibility of mind, 107. Hightened by

the consideration of its immateriality, 107.

II. SECOND ARGUMENT: THE CONCURRENT BELIEF OF ALL AGES AND

ALL PEOPLES IN A FUTURE STATE...............

108

Remarkable uniformity in this belief, 108. How account for it, 108. Belief

of the ancient Egyptians-Persians—Greeks-and Roman Mythology, 109.

Socrates—The Phaedon, 110. Seneca, 111. Cicero—The Emperor Adrian's

address to his soul-Various nations, 112. North American Indians-

Proved to be the sentiment of humanity, 113. Failure of the effort of

modern annihilationists to discredit the fact-Lesson taught by it, 113.

III. TRIRD ARGUMENT: A FUTURE LIFE ONLY CAN SATISFY THE Cox-

DITIONS AND CAPACITIES OF OUR MENTAL BEING..........

114

The human race presenting a succession of evanescent beings, 114. Is this

all? 114. Full development unattained, 115. Changing into a higher

life, 115. The future life, 116. Thoughts of Mr. Addison, 117. If no

future life, then the endowment of “spirit” is useless, 118. Advantages

of instinct to the brute, 119. Protest against so cheerless a conclusion,

119. The instinct of immortality, 119.

IV. THE HUMAN CONSCIENCE IS A PROPHECY OF IMMORTALITY........... 120

Conscience and its function, 120. Its universality, 120. Efforts of the

heathen to appease it, 120. Impaired, 121. In the commission of sin-

Skeptic, tell-No escape from it, 121.

V. AN ARGUMENT DRAWN FROM THE CONFESSIONS OF INFIDELITY....... 122

What they indicate, 122. Confession of Thomas Paine-An unconfessed

feeling among infidels—The soul waking up at death-Altamont, 123.

Not drop from this into nothingness.

VI. TAE DEDUCTIONS OF REASON VERIFIED BY THE TEACHINGS OF

REVELATION..........

123

Case stated, 123. Faith of the sainted dead as seen in Bible history, 124.

Job-David-Paul-The rich man and Lazarus, 125. Identity-Prayer of

our Lord for his saints—The penitent thief upon the cross, 126. The sur-

vivance of the soul declared-Apocalyptic vision of the souls of the

martyrs-Human reason versus revelation.

VII. OBJECTIONS AND CONCLUDING REMARKS.........

127

1. The objection to the immortality of the mind that it apparently comes

into life with the body, waxes to maturity with it, grows old with it, and

dies with it, considered and removed, 127. 2. The objection that the

primitive words-perish, destruction, death-in the Bible, indicate anni.

hilation of the living principle; and, therefore, contradict the doctrine

that the soul is essentially immortal, tested and refuted, 128. 3. If the

soul is to endure forever, its condition in all the ages of the future should

deeply concern us now, 130.

VII.

DEATH AND RESULTS.

PAGE.

Death pregnant with mysteries, 132. Possible continued earthly existence,

132. Easy transition to the higher state, 133. For what humanity was

designed, 133. What probation implies, 133.

I. THE SENTENCE OF DEATH..........

134

The words of the sentence, 134. Their import, 134. Death's earthly domin-

ion universal, 135.

II. ESSENTIAL NATURE OF DEATH

135

Gloomy symbols, 135. Precursors—Parts of the body destroyed, but not

death, 135. The dweller gone forth, the dwelling destroyed, 136. Going

forth of the life of the plant, 136. The living element in the brute, 136.

The disappearance of the highest life of all, 137. Death, 137.

III. PROCESS AND SYMPTOMS OF DYING

137

Parts of the body die in succession, 137. The blood, 138. Organic functions

after death, 138. Hippocrates's description of the dying man, 138. De-

scription from the London Quarterly, 139.

IV. THE TERRIBLENESS OF DEATH......

139

Instinctive dread of death, 139. Separation of the soul from the body, 140.

Sundering the ties of human life, 141. Death of the wicked, 141.

V. Moral ExDS OR USES OF THESE TERRORS ....

142

Is it an unnecessary severity? 142. Guardians of life, 142. Safeguard of

society, 143.

VI. PHILOSOPHY UNABLE TO REMOVE THESE TERRORS..........

144

Brutal insensibility or trifling levity, 144. The arguments of philosophy

stated, 144. Their force weighed, 146.

VII. HIGHER AGENCIES IN DEATH

146

The Christian's triumph over death does not spring from a disrelish of life's

blessings, 146. 1. In him the causes of death's terribleness are taken

away, 147. 2. He has an assurance that no harm can come to him in

passing through the dark valley, 148. 3. Death the gateway to endless

joy, 150. 4. Dying grace given in a dying hour, 152. Ministering

spirits, 153. Clearer insight, 154. Dr. Payson, 154. Value of religion, 155.

VIII. Last MOMENTS AND DYING WORDS OF DISTINGUISHED MEN...... 156

Interest in the dying words of men, 156. Their lessons, 156. Testing

hours, 157. George Buchanan, 157. Sir Walter Raleigh, 158. Nelson,

158. Sir Thomas More, 158. Frederick V, 158. Roscommon, 158. Tasso,

158. Schiller, 158. Maccail, 158. Keats, 158. Addison, 158. Last words

of various persons, 159. Mozart, 160. Last hours of Cardinal Wolsey,

162. A striking class of psychological phenomena, 163.

IX. LESSONS AFFORDED BY THE SUBJECT..

164

1. Death is not the destruction of the living principle in man, 161. 2. Life

is long enough for its purposes, 164. 3. We carry down to death the

character we have formed in life, 164. 4. Death will come to us all, 165,

The ground already surveyed, 166. Interest we have in this question, 166.

Efforts to penetrate the mystery of death, 167. This uncertainty an ele-

ment of terror, 167. The dying saint, 167.

I. THERE IS AN INTERMEDIATE STATE OF SOME KIND...........

168

An interval between death and final judgment, 168. “Last day,” 169.

Two prevalent errors, 170. Destiny decided, but fuller development of

it, 171. Final judgment declaratory, 172. Occurs at the end of the

world, 173.

II. ERRORS ANCIENT AND MODERN CONCERNING THE INTERMEDIATE

STATE........

173

Job's description, 173. 1. The under-world theory, 174. 2. Spirits linger-

ing about the place of burial, 175. 3. The soul entering some other body,

177. 4. Intermediate abode, 178. 5. Purgatory of the Papal Church, 179.

Materialistic theory that the soul dies with the body, 180.

III. THE INTERMEDIATE STATE OF THE DEAD ONE OF CONSCIOUS

EXISTENCE........

181

The dead do not return to give intelligence, 181. Philosophy fails, 182.

Revelation makes it known as a conscious state, 182. Scripture proofs,

183. Conclusion certain, 187.

IV. IN THE INTERMEDIATE STATE THE RIGHTEOUS DEAD ARE WITH

CHRIST

187

A state versus a place, 187. Gehenna, Sheol, Hades, 188. Intermediate

probation unscriptural, 189. Full consummation of bliss not before

the resurrection, 190. The righteous dead with Christ, 190.

V. ESSENTIAL MORAL CHARACTER OF THE SOUL IN THE INTERMEDIATE

STATE WILL BE THE SAME AS IN THE BODY

192

Character and destiny, 192. Death is the act of passing, 192. Improved

condition, 193. The progression of the next life a development of the

character formed, 193. The characters we shall carry with us, 194.

VI. THE SOUL IN THE INTERMEDIATE STATE RETAINS ITS APPROPRIATE

HUMAN FORM........

195

Shape in the disembodied state, 195. Curious physiological fact, 195. The

spiritual body, 196. Notions of heathen poets and philosophers, 196.

Ulysses and the shade of his mother, 196. Bible recognition of the dead

clothed in human form, 197. The soul longing for reunion, 197. Cicero

exulting in the prospect of it, 197. The Indian mother, 198. The demand

of this sentiment, 199. Sublime anticipations, 200.

VII. THE TRANSITION IN DEATH........

200

A poetic description, 200. Death a change of evolution, 201. Mr. Tennant,

202. Experience of the dying saint, 202. The natural and the super-

natural meet—The soul's transit, 203. Emerging into another life, 203.

Extract from Mr. Harbaugh, 204.

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Reign of death, 213. Fate of the dead, 213. Moment of the question, 214.

I. SUGGESTED BY THE ANALOGIES OF NATURE...................................

215

1. Day and night symbols of life and death, 215. 2. The resurrections of

Spring striking emblems of the resurrection, 217. 3. The symbolization

of the resurrection of vegetable life is recognized by St. Paul, 219.

4. Animal and insect transformations symbolize the resurrection, 220.

II. TAUGHT IN THE OLD TESTAMENT SCRIPTURES............

221

Three points made against those who deny that the resurrection is recog-

nized in the Old Testament, 221. 1. The resurrection of the body is

directly asserted, either in relation to individuals, or in a general man-

2. Inspired men expressed the utmost confidence in the resur-

rection, 224. 3. The resurrection received by the Jews, 226.

III. MORE CLEARLY ASSERTED IN THE NEW TESTAMENT.................. 229

1. It had on various occasions the tacit assent of Christ, 229. 2. The resur-

rection of the dead is distinctly taught and affirmed by our Lord, 230. 3. It

was affirmed in various ways by the apostles, 231.

IV. DEMONSTRATED BY MIRACULOUS RESURRECTIONS........

234

A reasonable expectation, 234. 1. The son of the widow of Zarephath, 234.

2. Son of the Shunamite, 236. 3. The man raised to life by touching the

bones of Elisha, 238. 4. Daughter of Jairus the ruler, 239. 5. Son of

the widow of Nain, 242. 6. The resurrection of Lazarus, 243. 7. The

dead bodies of the saints resurrected at the crucifixion, 246. The pro-

gressive character of these miracles, 247. Culmination of them, 248.

THE RESURRECTION OF CHRIST THE PLEDGE OF OURS.

Importance attached to it in the Church, 249. A dark hour, 249.

I. CIRCUMSTANTIAL OR CORROBORATING EVIDENCE.........

250

Position stated, 250. 1. There was such a man as Jesus Christ, 251. 2. The

prophets not only foretold his appearance and character, but also his

death and resurrection, 254. 3. He predicted his own death and resurrec-

tion, 256. 4. He was crucified, dead, and buried, 257. 5. The utmost

precaution was used to guard the body, 258. 6. On the morning of the

third day the body had disappeared, 258. 7. The account given by the

Jews of the disappearance is incredible, 259. 8. The resurrection was

established as a matter of faith in the age in which it occurred, 201.

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