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Ramble, ftow Richmond by water to London, and Salamanders, im order of ladies described
about it, by the Spectator -
. 451 Sallust, bis excellence . . .

. 409

.
Bamsey, (William) the astrologer, his whimsical de Salmon Mrs. her ingenuity
scription of night -

Salutation subject to great enormities

.239
Rants considered as blemishes in our English trage. Salutations in churches cepsured -
dies - -

Sanctorius, his invention -
Rape of Prosperine,' a French opera, some particu Santer, Mrs. A great spuff taker
lars in it

- 29 Sappho, an excellent portess
Raphael's Cartoons, their effect upon Spectator 226, 244 Dies for love of Phaon
The cxcellence of his pictures

- 4671 Herb

Her hymn to Venus . .
Rattling Club, got into the church

- 630 A fragment of Sappho's translated into three dif-
Read, (Sir William) his operations on the cyes

erent languages - -
Readers divided by the Spectator into the murcu Satire, Whole Duty of Man' turned into one - - 56
rial aud saturnine - -

9 Satires, English ribaldry and Billingsgate
Beason, instead of governing passion is often sub-

Panegyrical on ourselves -
servient to it .

6 Satirists best instruct us in the mapners of their re-
Not to be found in brutes .

spective times
The pilot of the passions .
. 408 Scandal to whom most pleasing

- 426
A pretty nice proportion between that and passion 408! How monstrous it renders us

. 451
Rebus, a kind of false wit among the ancients 59 Scales, (golden a dream of them
And our own countrymen

Scaramouch an expedient of his at Paris

2023
A rebus at Blenheim-house condemned - - 59 Scarves, the vanity of some clergymen's wearing
Recitative, (Italian) not agreeable to an English au-

them - - - - - - - - 609
dience - - - - - -

Scholar's egg, what so called
Recitative music in every language ought to be a Schoolmasters, the ingnorance and want of discern-
dapted to the accent of the language

ment in the generality of them - 157, 168, 313
Recreation, the necessity of it -

Schoolmen their ass case -

- 19/
Religion, the greatest incentive to good and worthy How appřed . . . . . . . 191

actions - - - - - - - - 316 Scipio, his judgement of Marius when a boy - 157
Considered
159 'Scornful lady, 'Spectator's observations at that pla

ay 270
A moroso melancholy behaviour, which is observed Scot, Dr. his christian life, its inerits
in coveral precise professors of religion, repror Scotch, a saying of theirs -

.463
by the Spectator - - - - . - 494 Serbblers against Spectator, why neglected by him 445
The true spirit of, composes and cbeers the soul - 49 The inost offensive .

• 582
Renatus Valentinus, his father and grandfather, their Seasons, a dream of them

story - - - - - - - - 426 Seli'conciet, an inhabitant of the paradise of fools 400
Rentfroe, (Sabina) ber letter about the green siek Self denial, the great foundation of civil virtue - 218
Dess

Scif love transplanted, what - - -

. 129
Repository for fashions a building proposed and de-

The narrowness and danger of self-love

- 588
scribed .

Semanthe, her character

- 404
The usefulness of it .

Semiramis ler prodigious works and powers - 415
Reproof when jusly deserved, how we ought to be Sempronia a professed admirer of the French nation 45

have under it - - - - - - 382 The match maker - - - - . - $37
Reputation a species of laine

- 218 Seneca, his saying of Drunkenness - - - 669
The stability of it, if well founded

- 218 Sense : some men of, more despicable than beggars 6
Retirement, the pleasure of it where truly enjoyed 4 The different degrees of sense in the several dif-
. A dream of it .
• 125 ferent species of animals

- 619
Revelation, what ligbt it gives to the joys of heaven - 600 Sentry, (Captain) a member of the Spectator's club,
Revenge of a Spanisb lady on a man who boasted of

his character .........

• 2
her favours

.
. . - - - - - 611 His account of a soldier's Ufo -

.
-

.
-

. 152

152
Abubarb, (John Esq.) his memorial from the coun His discourse with a young wrangler in the law 197

try infirmary - - - - - - - 429 He receives a letter from Ipswich, giving an ac-
Rich, (Mr.) would not suffer the opera of Whiting-

count of an engagment between a French priva-
ton's cat to be performed in his house, and

teer and a little vessel belongiog to that place 350
the reason for it -

Ilis reflections on that action - - - - 350
Rich: to be rich, the way to please

- 280 Takes possession of bis uncle Sir Roger do Cover
The advantages of riches.

ley's estate - - - - - - - 517
The art of growing rich -

- 283) September (month of] described ..
The proper use of riches .

- 991 Servants the general corruption of their madners · 88
The defects of rich men overlooked -

- 461 Assume their master's titlo -
Richelieu, (Cardinal) his politics made Franco the Some good among the bad oneg -
terror of Europe -

- 305 Influenced by the example of their supcriors 90, 107
Riches corrupt men's morals
464] The great mcrit of some servants in all ages

- 107
Ridicule, the talent of ungenerous tempers . . 215) The hard condition of many servants - - 137
Ridicule, the two great branches of, in writing - 219 Sexes : amity between agreeablo porsons of different
Put to a good use
• 445 sexes dangerous - .

.400
Riding, a healthy exercise

• 115 Sexes: the advantages of amity to cach
Riding-dress of ladies, the extravagance of it. - 435 Sextas Quintus, the pore, an instance of his unfor-
Rival motber, the first part of her history . - 91 giving temper . - - - - - 23
Robin, the porter at Will's coffee-house, his qualifi Shadows and realities not mixed in the same pieco
cation - - - - - - - - 398 Shakspeare, wlrerein inimitable -

. 141
Roman and Sabine ladies, their example recom-

Excels all writers in his gbosts -

.419
mended to the British

His excellence
Bomans, an instance of the general good under Shalum, the Chinese, his letter to the Priucces llilna
standing of the ancient Romans -
• 502 before the flood

. 59
Rosalinda, a famous whig partisan, her misfortune 81 Sherlock, (Dr.) the reason his discourse of death
Rosicrucius, the story of his sepulchro

- 379 hath been so much perused .
A protended discovery made by a Rosicrucian - 574 Improved the notion of beaven and beli ,
Rowley, (Mr.) his proposals for a new pair of globes 552 Shoeing horns, who, and by whom employed - 536
Royal Exchange, the great resort to it

69 | Shovel, (Sir Cloudesley) the ill contrivance of his
*Royal Progress,' a poem - - - - - 620 monument in Westminster Abbey - • . 26
Rusticity shocking

Shows and diversions lio properly within tbe pro-
Rusty, (Scabbard) his letter to the pectator

vince of the Spectator .
Rynsault, the unjust governor, in what manner Sickness, a thought on it .

punished by Charles, Duke of Burgundy, his Sidney, (Sir Philip) his opinion of the song of 'Chcry
sovereign

Chaso - - - -

Verses on his modesty
SAINT Paul's clognence . - - - - 633 sighers, a club of them at Oxford .
VOL. II.

the proper growing riches

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His componentes Sir Roge successionist him . 43

No.1
Sirhers, their regulations

30 Spectator, his visit to a travelled lady
Sight, the most perfect senso

411 His speculations in the first principles
Pleasures of imagination arise originally from it .411 An odd accident that befell him at Lloyds coffee-
Furnishes it with ideas

.411 house - - - - - - -
Sughe, second, iu Scotland

. 604 Ilis advice to our English Pindarie writers
Siga posts, the absurdity of many of them .

His exainen of Sir Fopling Flutter .
Silk-worm, a churacter of one

.431
-

His inquisitive temper-

is in
Similitudes, eminent writers faulty in them

. 4211 llis account of himself and his works to be written
The preservation of voveral poems
- 421 300) years henco

103
An ill one in a pulpt -
. 4.171 His great modesty

. 101
Simonides, his satire on women -

- 209 He accompanies Sir Roger de Coverley into the
Sincerity, the great want of it in conversation . 103 country

.

. 106
The advantages of it over dissimulation and deceit 352
* it over dissimulation and deceit 3521 His exercise when young

. 115
The most compendious wisdom -
. 352] He goes with Sir Roger a hunting

- 116
Singularity, when a virtue - -

And to the assizes . - .
An instance of it in a north country gentleman - 576 His adventure with a crew of gipsies

- 130
Sippit, Jack his character

The several opinions of him in the country - 131
Slavery, what kind of govornment the most removed His return to London, and fellow travellers in the
from it .

- - . 2871

stage coach - - - - - - - 132
Sloven, a character affocted by some, and for what His soliloquy upon the sudden and unexpected
reason - - - - - - - - 150 death of a friend

. . . 133
The folly and antiquity of it .

Jlis artifice to engage his different readers . 11
Sly, the haberdasher, advertisement to young gen-

The character given of him in his own prescace, at
tlemen in the last year of their apprenticeship 18 a cotiee-house near Aldgate -

- 213
Sly, (John) the tobacconist, his representation to the His a version to pretty fellows, and the reason of it 361
Spectator

5321 His acknowledgements to the public . - 202
Tlis ininuto

His advice to the British ladies . . . 265
Smithfield bargain, in marriage, the inhumanity of it 3041 Ilis adventure with a woman of the town - 266
Snape, Dr. a quotation from his charity sermon

His description of a French puppet newly arrived 977
Snarlerg - - - - - - - -

Has opinion of our form of governmevt and religion 227
Suuff-box, the exercise of it, where tought

138 Sometimes taken for a parish sexton, and wby 2-9
Socrates, his tempor and prudenco

His retiections upon Clarinda's journal - 333
His behaviour at his execution

Accompanies Sir Roger to Westminster Abbey 3:29
His speech to his judges -

146 His sacrifices to humanity - • - - 355
Ilis notion of pleasure and pain

183 His behaviour under reproach, and reasons for bot
The effect of his tein peranco .

returning an answer to those who have animad-
llis instruction to his pupil Alcibiades in folation

vorted on his paper
to prayer .

His contemplations on Good Friday . - 336
A catechetical method of arguing introduced Arst The benefits accruing to the public from his spece-
by him
. - - - - -

lations
*

.
Instructod in eloquence by a woman

His papers much sought for about Christmas, loy
Why the oracle pronounced bim the wisest of men 1001 all his neighbours - - - -

367
Ilead of the sect of the hen-pecked. . - 479

His comparison of the world to a stage . . $70
jlis domestics, what

He accoio panies Sir Roger to Spring garden . 383
The effect a discourso of his op marriage had with His zeal for the Hanover succession
liis audience.

His invitation to all sorts of people to assist bia - 442

:
Ilis sayings of misfortunes

: : • 557

57 About the stamps - -
Soldiers, when men ce sense, of an agreeable convor-

Guardian of the fair sex
sation - - -
152 Ilis advertisements

. . 461
Solitude: an exemption from passions the only pleas-

About the price of his paper

. . 461
ing solitude

Put into the golden scales
Few persons capable of a religious, learned, or

A sort of news letter
philosophical solitudo

264

His account of a coti'cc-house debate, relating to
Solomon's Hong,' paraphrase on the second chapter 3881 the difference between Count Rechteren and
Song, with notes

Monsieur Meenager . . . . . 481
Sophocles, his conduct in his tragedy of Electra' 411 The different sense of his readers upon the rise of
Sorites, what sort of figure ..

239 his paper, and the Spectator's proposals upon
Sorrow, the outward signs of it very fallacious 951 His observations on our modern poems
Sou), the immortality of it evidenced from several His edict - - - - - - -
proofs .

• 111

The effects of his discourses on marriage .
Its happiness the contemplation of God

His deputation to J. Sly, habordasher of hats and
State of it after separation
413 tobacconist - - -

.
Excellency of it considered in relation to dreamns 487 The different judgments of his readers concerning
Sounds, how improper for description

- 416

his speculations
• Speccia della Bestia triomphanto,' a book sold at an

His reasons for often casting his thoughts into a
auction for thirty pounds - - - - 389 letter - -
Some account of that book

.309 His project for the forming a new club
Space, infinite, Sir Isaac Newton's noble way of con Visits Mr. Motteux's warehouses
sidering it .

.

564 The great concern the city is in upon his desig
Sparkish, (Will) a modish husband

laying down bis paper - -
Sparrows bought for the use of the Opera

9 He takes his leave of the town
Spartan virtue acknowledged by the Athenians

Breaks a fifty years silence
Spartan justice, an instance of it -

564) How he recovered his speech
Spartans, the method used by them in the education liis politics
of their children .

307 Loquacity
Spectator, (The) his prefatory discourse

Of no party
His great taciturnity . . .

A calamity of his
His vision of public credit

Critics upon him
His entertainment at the table of an acquaintance He sleeps as well as wakes for the publio
jlis recommendation of his speculations

10 - His dream of Trophonius's cave
Advertised in the Daily Courant

19Why the eighth volume publisbed
flis encounter with a lion behind the scenes 13 Speech, the several organs of it .
7'he design of his writings

· 16 Spenser, his advice to young ladies under the distress
No party man

. 16 of defamation
A little unhappy in the mould of his face . 17! His whole creation of shadowy persons
llis artifice

19 Spies, not to be trusted
Ilis desire to correct impudence

20 Despised by great men
And resolution to march on in the cause of virtue 34 Spirit, an high ono, a great enemy to candour

• •

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Spirits, the appearauce of them not fabulous - 110 Tillotson, (Archbishop) improved the notion of hea-
Several species in the world besides ourselves - 1191 ven and hell -

. 447
Spleen, a common excuse for dulnos8 -

- 53 Time, our ill use of it . . . . - 99
Its effects - - - - -

- 558 The Spectator's direction how to spend it · 93
Spring, the pleasantest season of the year
393 How the time we live ought to be computed

- 316
A description of it

123 Title-page, (Anthony) his petition to the Spectator - 304
His attendants

423 Titles, the significancy and abuse of them -
Spring garden, a kind of Mahometan paradise - 383! Tom Tit, to personate sining birds in the Opera - 5
Spy, the mischief of one in a family

2 Tom Touchy, a quarrelsome fellow - - - 122
Squeezing the hand, by whom first used in making

Tom Trusty, a tender husband and careful father - 4
love . . -

- - - - 209 Tom Tulip, challenged by Dick Crastin - - 91
Squires, (rural) their want of learning -

9 Flies into the country
Stamps, how fatul to weekly historians -

.445 Tom the tyrant, first minister at the coffee-houso
Starch, political, its use

. 305

between the hours of eleven and twelve at night 49
Starors reproved -

0 Tombs in Westminster Abbey visited by Spectator - 2
Stars, (fixo) how their immensity and magnificence . His reflections upon them - . . . - 26
confound us

Toper, (Jack) his recommendatory letter in behalf of
A contemplation of the stars

a servant -
.. .

-

- 493
State, (future) the refreshments a virtuous person Torre, in Devonshire, how unchaste widows are pu-

enjoys in prospect and contemplation of it - 186 pished there .
Statira, in what proposed as a pattern to the fair sex 41 Torture, why the description of it pleases, and not
Statuary the most natural representation
• 416! the prospect - -

418
Stint (Jack) and Will Trap, their adventure - 448 Townly, (Frank his letters to the Spectator -

• 560
Stoics diecarded all passions

. 397 | Trade, the benefit of it to Great Britain
Stores of Providence, what.
- 248 Trading and landed interest ever jarring

- 174
Story tellers, their ridiculous punctuality

- 138 The most likely means to make a man's private
Strife the spirit of it -

fortune - - - - - -
Stripes, the use of them on perverse wives - - 479 Tradition of the Jews concerning Moses - -
Stroke, to strike a bold one, what meant by it - 319 Tragedy: a perfect tragedy the noblest production
Sublime in writing, what it is -
. . 592 of human nature - - -

- 39
Sudden, (Thomas esq.) his memorial from the coun-

Wherein the modern tragedy exceeds that of
try infirmary

- - - 429 Greece and Rome - - -
Sukey's adventure with Will Honeycomb and Sir Blank verse the inost proper for English Tragedy
Rogor de Coverley -

- 4101 The English tragedy considered
Sun, the first eve of consequence

- 250 Tragi-comedy, the product of the English theatre, a
Gun-rising and stuing most glorious show in nature 412 monstrous invention -
Superiority reduced to the notion of quality . 219 Transmigration, what
To be founded only on merit and virtue -

The transmigration of souls asserted by Will
Superstition, the folly of it described .

neycomb
An error, arising from a mistaken dovotion 201 How believed by the ancients

408
Has something in it destructive of religion - 213 Trap, (Mr. his letter to Mr. Stint
Surprise, the life of stories - - - - - 538 | Travel, highly necessary to a coquetto -

45
'Susanna, or Tunocence Betrayed,' to be exhibited The behaviour of a travelled lady in the playhouse 45

by Powell, with a new pair of Elders - - 14 At what time travelling is to be undertaken, and
Sweaters, a species of the Mohock club

the truc onds of it - - - - - - 364
Swingers, a set of familiar romps at Tunbridge - 492 Travellers, the generality of them exploded - - 474
Symmetry of objects, how it strikes

- 411 | Troes, more beautiful in all their luxuriancy
Snycopits, modern ones -

- 567 when cut and trimmed . . . . . 414
Syncopuis, the passionate, his character

- 488 Trimming, the Spectator unjustly accused of it - 445
Syracusan prince, jealous of his wife, how he served Trueby, (Widow her water recommended by Sir
her

Roger as good against the stone and gravel - 3

Truepenny, (Jack) strangely good-natured • - 82
TALE-BEARERS censured

Trunk-maker, a great man in the upper gallery in the
Talents to be valued aceording as they are applied - 172 playhouse - - - - - - - 235
Taste (corrupt) or the age to what attributed 140, 208! Truth, an enemy to false wit .
Taste of writing, what it is, and how acquired . 409 The everlasting good effect truth has even upon a

The perfection of a inan's taste as a seuse - 409 man's fortune and interest
Deincd - - - - - -

- 409
Always consistent with itself

- 352
That of the English
- 409 The excellence of it . .

- 507
Tears, not always the sign of true sorrow - · 95 Tryphidorus, the great lipogrammatist of antiquity 59
Tomper, serious, the advantage of it -
- 39 Tully praises himself .

562
Temperance the best preservative of health .

What he said of the immortality of the soul - 588
What kind of temperance the best .
1951 Oruttering a jest - - - -

. 616
Templar, one of the Spectator's club his character. 2 Of the force of novelty . -
Temple, (Sir William) his role for drinking
195 What he required in his orator -

- 633
Ten, called by Platonic writers the complete number 221 Turner, (Sir William) his excellent maxim - - 503
Tender hearts, an entertainment for them .. - 627 Tyrants, why so called - - - - - 508
Tenure, the most alippery in England
Terence, Spectator's observations on one of his p

2 VAINLOVES, the family of
Terror and pity, why those passions please : - 418 Valentinus (Basilius) and Alexandrinus, their story 426
Thales, bis saying of truth and falsehood
94 Valerio, his character -

- 404
Thames, its banks, and the boats on it described - 454 Valctudinarians in chastity -

395
That, his remonstrance .

.
- 201 Valetudinarians in society, who

- 100
Theatre, (English) the practice of it in several in-

Not to be admitted into company but on conditions 143
stances ccnsured -

-

42, 44, 51 Vanity the paradise of fools - - - -
Of making love in a Theatre - - - - 6021 A vision of her and her attendants - . .460
Themistocles, his answer to a question relating to the Vapours in women, to what to be ascribed

115
marrying his daughter - - - - - 3 Variety of men's actions proceeds from the passions 103
Theodosius and Constantia, their adventures - . 164) Varilas, his cheerfulness and good humour mako
'I'leognis, a beautiful saying of bis

461 him generally acceptable -
Thimbleton, (Ralph) his letter to the Spectator . 132 Ubiquity of the Godhead considered

. . 571
Thinking aloud, wirat - .
- 211) Further considerations about it

- 580
'Thoughts of the highest importance to sift them - 399Venice Preserved,' a tragedy, founded on a wrong

'hrash (Will) and his wife, an insipid couple - - 522) plot .
Thunder of great use on the stage

· 44 Veniis, charming figure she makes in the first Æneid 417
Thunderer to the playhouse, the hardships put upon An attendant on the spring
him, and his desire to be made a cannon · • 36 Verscs by a despairing lover

. 59
Tickell, (Mr.) his verscs to the Spectator
532 On Phobe and Colin

- 60

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Verses, translation of, pedautic, out of Italian - 617 Willian III. king of England, campared with the
The Royal Progress -
. 620 French king .

- 316
To Mrs.- , on her grotto

. 6321 Wimble. (Will) his letter to Sir Roger de Coverley 163
Vertumnus, an attendant on the spring
- 425 His character - -

los
Ugliness, some speculations upon it

Ilis conversation with the Spectator

. 108
Vice as laborious as virtue .
- 624 A man of ceremony - - -

- 119
Vilacerfe, (Madame de) an account of her death, Thinks the Spectator a fanatic

. 1.26
and manner of it - -

And fears he has killed a man . .

. 131
Vinci, (Leonardo his many accomplishments, and | Wine, not proper to be drapk by every one that can

remarkable circumstance at his death - - 554 swallow - - - - - -
Viner, Bir R.) his familiarity with King Charles II. 462 Winter gardens recommended and described
Virgil his beautiful allegories founded on the Platon Wise men and fools, the difference between thom 225
ic philosophy - - -

| Wise, (Mr.) the gardener, ap heroic poet . . 477
Wherein short of Homer

- 273 Wit, the mischief of it when accompanied with vice 23
His fable examined in relation to Halicarnassus's

Very pernicious when not tempered with virtue
history of Eneas -

and buinanity
His gopius

- 404 Turned into deformity by affectation
Compared with Homer

- 417 Only to be valued as it is applied
When he is best pleased

- 417 The history of false wit - -
Virtue, the exercise of it recommended -

. 93 Nothing so much admired and so little understood
Its influence . - .

. 93 Every man would be a wit if he could
Its near relation to decency

- 101 The way to try a piece of wit
The most reasonable and genuine source of honour 219 Mr. Locke's reflection on the difference between
Of a beautiful nature

- 213 wit and judgment
The great ornaments of it

- 243 The god of wit described
To be esteemed in a foc .
- 413 The many artifices and modes of false wit

- 220
When sincerity may reasonably be suspected - 266 May purchase ricbes, but is not to be purchased
The way to preserve it in its integrity

- 394 by riches - - - - -
The use of it in our afflictions

- 5201 Wit, false, why it sometimes pleases
Virtues, supposed ones not tu bo relied on
- 399 Nothing without judgment -

. 419
Vision of human misery -

604) Wits, minor, the several species of them
Visit: a visit to a travelled lady, which she received Wits ought not to pretend to be rich
in her bed, described

Woman, the utmost of her character wherein con-
Vocifer, the qualifications that make him pass for a

tajned -

- - - - - - 342
fino gentleman - -

The potion soine women have of virtue and vice 290
Volumes: the advantage an author receives of pub-

A definition of woman by one of the fathers - 265
lishing his works in volumes rather than in sin-

The general depravity of the inferior part of the
glo pieces - - - - - -
Understanding, the abuso of it is a great evil

They wholly govern domestic life
Wherein more perfect than the imagination

Woman of quality, ker dress the product of a hundred
Reasons for it - - - - - - 420 climates
Should master the passions
B Woman's man described

. 150
Univorse, how pleasing the contemplation of it - 420
- 420 His necessary qualifications

- 156
Cranius, his great composure of soul

- 113 Women the more powerful part of our people . !
Vulcan's dogs, the fable of them

- 579 Their ordinary employments .

Smitten with superficials -
WAGERING disputants exposed

- 145 | Women: their usual conversation
Wall, the prodigious one of China

. 415 Their strongest passion .
Wars, the late, made us so greedy of news

- 452 Not to be considered merely as objects of sight.
Wasps and doves in public, who .

| Women, (the English) excel ether nations in beauty SL
Wealth, the father of love .

Signs of their improveinent under Spectator's hand 92
Wealthy nien fix the character of persons to their The real commendation of a woman, what -95 104
circumstances

Their pains in all ages to adorn the outside of
Wedlock, state of, ridiculed by town witlings - 525 their heads - - - -

. 98
Weed, (Ephraim) his letter to the Spectator about More gay in their nature than men

- 128
his marriage and estates - - - - 450 Not pleased with modesty in men -
West Enborne, in Berkshire, a custom there for

Their ambition . . .

- 156
widows - - - - - - . - 614 Deluding women, their practices exposed - - 18:2
What Lord Coko said of the widows' tenure there Women great orators -

- - - - 247
Whichenovre bacon flitch, in Staffordshire, who en-

Have always designs upon men
titled to it - -

- - -

6071

Greater tyrants to their lovers than husbands • 490
Whisperers, political .

- 457 Reproved for their neglect of dress after they are
Whispering place, Dionysius the tyrant's

• 439
married - - - -

- - 506
Whito, Moil) a notorious witch

- 117 Their wonderful influence upon the other sex - 510
Who and Which, their petition to the Spectator . | Words, the abuse of them demonstrated in several in-
• Whole Duty of Man,' that excellent book turned

stances - - - - - - - - 373
into a satiro . . .

.

- 568 The pleasures proceeding to the imagination from
Widow, (the) hor manner of captivating Sir Roger the idcas raised by them

- 616
de Coverlcs

- 113 Work necessary for women
Her behaviour at the trial of her cause

1131 World, (the) considered useful and entertaining - 357
Her artifices and beauty .

. 113 The present world a nursery for the next . 111
Too desperate a scbolar for a country gentleman 113 World of matter, and life, considered by Spectator 519
Her reception of Sir Roger
. 113/Writer, how to perfect his imagination

- 117
Whom she helped to some tansy in the eye of all Who among the ancient poets had this faculty • 417
the country -

. . 113) Writing, the difficulty of it to avoid censure .568
Has been at the death of several foxes - - 115 Writing unintelligibly, the art of it rauch improved 379
Sir Roger's opinion of her, that she cither de

to marry or she does not - - - - 118 | XENOPHON, his school of equity
Widows, the great game of fortuno hunters - - 311 His account of Cyrus's trying the virtue of a young
Widows' Club, an account of it .

561 lord - - - - -
A letter from the president of it to the Spectator,
about her suitors - -

573/ YARICO, the story of her adventuro
Duty of widows in old times

- 606 Yawning, a Christmas gambol . .
A custom to punish unchaste ones in Berkshire & Youth, instructions to thein to avoid harlots 410
Devonshire .

- 614
Tastances of their riding the black ram there - 523 ZEAL, intemperate, criminal -

. .390
Wig, long one, the eloquence of the bar

- 407 Zemrode, (Queen) her story from the Persian Tales 578
William and Betty, a short account of their amous 118 Zoilus, the pretended critic, had a very long board - 331

ab

rying the virtue of air - 337

of a young to

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