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'No.

No.
Letter from Racigael Wateh ful on dancing - -376 Letter from with some reflections on the ocean,
From Myrtilla, desiring the Spectator's advice in

considered both in a calm and in a storm, and a
relation to her lover - - - - - 380 divine ode on that occasion - - - - 429
Urom J. S. animadverting on some persons' beha-

From Matilda Mohair, at Tunbridge, complaining
viour at church -

- - 38 of the disregard she meets with on account of
From T. 8. on vanity and the abundance of it in

her strict virtue, from the men who take inore
the female sex

. . : -

notice of the romps and coquettes than the rigids
From Betty Lemon, who had been presented with

From T. B. compl uning of the behaviour of some
A guinea by a Jew . - - - - 380 fathery towards their eldest sons - - - 496
From the sexton of St. Bride's, on a new charity-

From Rachael Shoetring, Sarah Trice, an humble
school of fifty rirls, erected in that parish

- 380

servant unknown, and Alice Bluegarter, in an-
From a gentleman in Denmark

393 swer to that of Matilda Mohair, who is with
From Queen Anne Boleyn to Henry the VIII - 397 child, and has crooked logs - - - - 964
From Cynthio to Flavia, and their answers, on From Moses Greenbag, the lawyer, giving an ac-
their breaking of their amour

- - - 398

count of some new brothers of the whip, who
From a bankrupt to his friend

- 456

have chambers in the Tetnple - . 598
The answer - - - -

- - - 456 From Will Honeycomb, with his dream, intended
From Lazarus Hopefull to Basil Plenty

- 472 for a Spectator - - - - - - 499
To the Spectator, from Peter de Quir, of St. John's

From Philogamus, in commendation of the married
college in Cambridge

- - 3

state - - - - - - - - 500
From a penitent jilt

From Ralph Wonder, complaining of the beha-
From a lady importuned by her mother to be un-

viour of an unknown lady at the parish church
faithful to her husband

near the Bridge . - - - - - 503
From a married man, who, out of jealousy, ob-

From Titus Trophonius, an interpreter of dreams 505
structed the marriage of a lady to whom he

From complaining of the oppression and in-
was guardian - - - -

-

justice observed in the rules of all elubs and
From a lady, whose lover would have abused her

meetings - - - - - - - 506
passion for him - -

- -402 From Hezekiah Thrift, a discourse on trade - 509
From a young uncle, on the disobedience of his

From Will Honeycomb occasioned by two stories
elder nephews and nieces - -

• 402

he had met with relating to a sale of women in
About a city and a country life -
- 406 Persia and China - - - -

- 511
With the translation of a Lapland ode-

- 406 From the Spectator's clergyman, being a thought
On the passions

408 on sickness - - - - - - - 513
Concerning Gloriana

- 423

From , with a vision of Parnassus - - 514
Of good humour

- 124 From with two enclosed, one from a cele
Of the country infirmary

brated town coquette to her friend newly mar-
Or common beggars

ried in the country, and her friend's answer - 514
Of charity schools -

From Ed. Biscuit, Sir Roger de Coverley's butler,
The freedoins of married men and women

with an account of his master's death

- 515
From Richard and Sabina Rentfree

From , condoling with him on Sir Roger's
About prejudice and emulation

432 death, with some remarkable epitaphs. - 31
Naked shoulders - - -

From Tom Tweer on physiognomy, &c. - - 518
A country society and infirmary

From F. G. a widower with some thoughts on a
From Camilla -

. 443

man's behaviour in that condition
From an Excbange man

- 443 From --, a great enemy to public report - 3M
About buffoonery

- 443 From T. W. a man of prudence, to his mistress - 522
From Ephraim Weed

- 450 To Spectator, from B.T. a sincere lover, to the same 529
From a projector for news

452, 457 From - dated from Glasgow in Scotland, with
About education

.455

a vision - - - - . - - 524
From one who had married a scold

455 From Pliny, to his wife's aunt, Hispulla
From Pill Garlick

- 455 From Moses Greenbag, to the Spectator, with a
About the use and abuse of similies

- 455 further account of some gentlemen-brothers of
Salutations at churches -

- 460 the whip - - - - - - - 325
With a translation of the 114th Psalm

. 461 From Philagnotes giving an account of the ill ef-
About the advance on the paper for the stamps - 461 fects of a visit paid to a female married relation 527
About King Charles the Second's gaieties - 462 From , who hnd made his mistress a present
About dancing
being

- - - - - - 466 of a fan, with a copy of verses on that occasion 527
About sight -

- 472 Froin Rachacl Welladay, a virgin of twenty three,
About penegyrical satires upon ourselves - 473 with a heavy complaint against the inen -523

From Will Honeycomb, lately married to a country
From Hob Short -

girl, with no portion, but a great deal of virtue 530
To the Spectator, from J. R. complaining of his From Mr. Pope, on the verres spoken by the Em
neighbours, and the turn of their conversation in

peror Adrain upon his death-bed - - - 132
the country - - - - - - - 474 From Dustererastus, whore parents will bot let
From Dulcibella Thankley, who wants a direction

him choose a wife for himself . . - 533
to Mr. Campbell the dumb fortune teller

From Penance Cruel, complaining of the behav-
From D. B. desiring the Spectator's advice in a

iour of persons who travelled with her in a
weighty affair

- - 476 stage coach out of Essex to London . - 533
From —, containing a description of his gar From Charlot Wealthy, setting forth the hard case
den -

of such women as are beauties and fortunes 5
From A. B. with a dissertation on fashions, and a

From Abraham Dapperwit, with the Spectator's
proposal for a building for the use of them - 478

answer . . . . - - - - - 534
Prom Monsieur Chezluy to Pharamond - - 480 From Jereiny Comfit, a grocer, who is in hopes of
To the Spectator, from a clerk to a lawyer 480 growing rich by loosing his customers -

• 534
From - , being a lady married to a cot quean - 482 From Lucinda Parly, a coffee house idol - - 534
From , with a dissertation on modesty - 484 From C. B. recommending knotting as a proper
From , containing reflections on the powerful

amusement to the beaux
effects of trifles and trifling persons - - 485 From a shoeing horn

· 556
From a handsome black man up two pair of s.airs, From Relicta Lovely, a widow
in the Paper-buildings in the Templo, who ri-

From Eustace, in love with a lady of eighteen,
vals a handsome fair ion, up one pair of stairs,

whose parents think her too young to marry by
in the same buildings . . - - - 485 three years

. . . . . . 39
From Robin Shorter with a postscript - - 485 From - complaining of a young divine, who
From
with an account of the unmarri-

murdered Archbishop Tillotson's sermon upon
ed hen-pecked, and a vindication of the mar-

evil speaking - - - - -
ried - - -

- -

486 From - with a short critique on Spenser - 540
from with an epigram on the Spectator, by

From Philo-Spec, who apprehends a dissolution of
Mr Tate

Spectator's club, and the ill conseqences of it - 5

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Letter from Captain Sentry, lately come to the pos Life how to have a right enjoyment of it . - 143
session of Sir Roger de Coverley's estate

A survey of it in a vision - - - - 159
From the Emperor of China to the Pope

To what compared in the Scriptures, and by the
From W. C. to the Spectator in cominendation

heathen pbilosophers

- 219
of a generous benefactor - - - - 546 The present life a state of probation . . 237
From Charles Easy, setting forth the sovereign use We are in this life nothing more than passengers 289

of the Spectators in several remarkable instances 547 | Illustrated by the story of a travelling dervise - 289
From , on poetical justice -
- 548 The three important articles of life

- 317
From Sir Andrew Freeport, retiring from business 549 Eternal life we ought to be most solicitous about 575
Froin Philonicus, a litigious gentleman, complain-

Man's not worth his care - - - - 575
ing of some unpolite law terins

Valuable only as it prepares for another - 575
From T. F.G.S. J.T.E. T. in commendation of Light and colours only ideas of the mind . - 413
the Spectator

3 Lillie, (Charles) his presents to the Spectator . 358
From Bantam the ambassador to his master, about Lindamina, the only women allowed to paint - 41
the English

557Lion in the Haymarket occasioned many conjectures
From the dumb conjurer to the Spectator

560 in the town

- - - - 13
From the Chit-chat Club

• 560 Very gentle to the Spectator
From Oxford about recovering his speech - 560 Livy, in what he excels all other historians - 409, 420
From Frank Townly

- 560 Logic of kings, what -
About the Widow's Club

- 561 Loller, (Lady Lydia) her memorial from the country
From Blank, about his family

- 563 infirmary
About an angry husband -

- 563 | London, an emporium for the whole earth
From Will Warley, about military education - 566 The differences of the manners and politics of one
From an half pay officer, about a widow

566 part from the other - -
From Peter Push, on the same subject - - 566 London, (Mr.) gardener, an heroic poet -
Against quacks - - - - - - 572 Longings in women, the extravagancies of them

- 326
From the president of the Widows' Club - 573 Longinus, an observation of that critic

. 339
From a man supposed mad for reading poetry aloud 577 Lottery, some discourse on it .

191
A second letter about the ubiquity of the Godhead 580 Love, the general concern of it -

• 30
Several answered at once

- 581 Our hearts misled by a love of the world - 27
From Constantio Spec
• 581 A passion never well cured

- 118
From Amanda Lovelength

- 581 Natural love in brutes more intense than in reason-
From Shalum, the Chinese to the Princess Hilpa,

able creatures - - - - - - 120
before the flood .

The gallantry of it on a very ill foot

.. 142
From Hilpa to Shalum

Love has nothing to do with state - - - 149
From John Shadow at Oxford, about reflecting at

The transport of a virtuous lover . . - 199
night on past day's actions

- 586

In what manner discovered to his mistress by one
About a vision of hearts
587 of Will Honeycomb's acquaintance

325
About plantinff
589 Love, the mother of poetry

- 377
From John Shadow, about dreams
- 593 The capriciousness of love

. 475
Of inconsistent metaphors
595 The romantic style in which it is made

- 479
From Jeremy Lovemore, an account of his life 596 A nice and fickle passion

- 506
About making love

- 6021 Method to preserve it alive after marriage - 506
From Fanny Fickle
• 605 Love cusuist, some instructions of his

607
From an aunt, about her niece's idleness
- 606 Lover, an account of the life of one

596
About the vanity of clergymen wearing scarfs - 609 A crossed one retires

627
From Tom Nimble, about antipathies
- 609 Lover's Leap. where situated

225
From Cleora, against the ladies work

An effectual cure for love

227
From Lesbia, a deluded lady
- 611 A short history of love

233
About genealogy

-612 Loungers, a new sect of philosophers in Cambridge
From Will Hopeless, about ambition

.613 Luxury, what - -
From the Temple, about beggars' eloquence - 613 Attended often with avarice

55
From Moniunia, to recovor a lost love

- 613) A fable of those two vices
From a country wit, in the burlesque way - 616 The luxury of our modern meals
From a pedant, in his pedantic way, on the same Lying, the malignity of it

- 507
subject
- - - - - - - 017
6171 Party lying, the prevalency of it

. 507
About the styles of letters

. 618 Lysander, his character
Answers to several

619
About flattery

1 MACBETH, the incantations in that play vindicated 141
From the love casuist, about the widows' tenure Machiavel, his observations on the wise jealousy of
and the black ram

states - - - - - - - - 405
From the same about love queries

25 | Mahometans, a custom among them
From one who recommended himself for a news Their cleanliness
monger
- - - -

- 625 Male vilts, who . . . - - - - 288
About the force of novelty
26 Males only among the birds have voices

- 128
About a crossed lover

527 Malvolio, his character
About eternity to como

628 Man, a sociable animal
About church music

The loss of public and private virtues owing to
About the Rattling Club's getting into church - 630 men of parts
Letter dropper of antiquity, who

Man variable in his temper .
Levees of great men animadverted upon
. 193 The merriest species of the creation

249
Levity of women, the effects of it

The mercenary practice of men in the choice of
Lewis of France compared with the Czar of Muscovy 139 wives - - - - - - - - 196
Libels, a severe law against them

- 451 Men differ from one another as much in sentiment
Those that write or read them excommunicated 451 as features - - - - - - - 264
Liberality, wherein the decency of it consists 292 Their corruption in general

264
The true basis of it

346 Man the middle link between angels and brutos 408
Liberty of the people, when best preserved - 287 What he is, considered in himself
Library; a lady's library described ..

The homage be owes his Creator .
Liddy, Miss) the difference between her temper By what distinguished from all other creatures 494
and that of her sister Martha, and the reasons

Suffers more from imaginary than real evils 505
of it . . . . . . . 396 His subjection to the female sex

- 510
Lie giyen, a great violation of the point of honour 99 Wonderful in bjs naturo

. 519
Several sorts of lies .

. 234

The two views he is to be considered in - 588
Life; the duration of it uncertain
27 An active being

- 624
In what manner spent according to Seneca
93 His ultimate end

- 624
Not real but when cheerful
. 143 Manilius, his character

- 467
In what manner to be regulated

Maple, (Will) an impudent libertine

. 203

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basis of when beshed

- 441

temper

Lion ried persons, . 506

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No.1
March (month of) described

425 Mode, on what it ought to be built
Marcia'e prayer in Cato

- - - 593 1 A standing mode of dress recommended
Mariamne, the fine dancer

466 Moderation a great virtue .
Marlborough, (John Duke of) took the French lines Modesty, the chief ornament of the fair sex
without bloodshed

In men no ways acceptable to the ladies - . 154
Marriage: those marriages the most happy that are Sell-denial and modesty frequently attended with
proceded by a long courtship . . . 261

unexpected blessings

- 206
Unhappy marriages, froin whence proceeding 268 Modesty, the contrary of ambition

- 206
Marriage life, always a vexatious or happy condition 149 A due proportion of modesty requisite to an ora-
Married condition rarely unhappy but from want of

tor

231
judgment or temper in the husband . - 479 The excellency of it
Advantages of it preferable to a single stato 479, 500 Vicious modesty, what

- 231
Termed purgatory by Tom Dapperwit - - 482 The misfortunes to which the modest and innocent
The excellence of its institution - -

- 490
are often exposed

- 242
The pleasure and uneasiness of married persons, to

Distinguished from sheepishness

- 373
what inputed - - - - - - 500

The definition of modesty
The foundation of community

Wherein it consists -

- 390
For what reason liable to so much ridicule

Modest assurance, what .

- 373
Further thoughts of the Spectator on that subject 525 The danger of false modesty

. 453
Mary, an attendant on the spring'. .

Distinguished from the true

- 458
Martial, op epigram of his on a grave man's being at An unnecessary virtue in professors of the law - 48
a lewd play - -

446 The sentiments entertained of it by the ancients - 48
Masquerade, a complaint against it

Rules recommended to the modest man by the
The design of it - -

Spectator

- 484
Master, a good one, a prince in his family

107 | Mohock, the meaning of that name - - - 324
A complaint against some ill masters

37 Several conjectures concerning the Mohocks - 347
Matter, the least part of it contains an unexhausted Moliere made an old woman a judge of his plays - 70
fund -

420 Money : the Spectator proposes it as a thesis
The basis of animals

The power of it - - - - - - 450
May, a month extremely subject to calentures in The love of it very commendable

.450
Women
- - - - . . -

365 Monsters, novelty bestows charms on them - 412
The Spectator's caution to females on that account 365 Incapable of propagation - . . . . 413
Dangerous to the ladies -

05 What gives satisfaction in the sight of them -418
Described . .

Montague, fond of speaking of himself-

. 562
Mazarin, (Cardinal) his behaviour to Quillet, who 1 Scaliger's saying of him - -
had reflected upon him in a poem

Monuments in Westminster Abbey examined by the
Meanwell, (Thomas) his letter about the freedoms of

Spectator - -
married men and women

Those raised by envy the most glorious
Memoirs of a private country gentleman's life 22 | Moorfields, by whom resorted to

- 505
Memory, how improved by ideas of the imagination 417 | Morality, the benefit of it .
Men of the town rarely make good husbands - 522 Strengthens faith

- 465
Merah, her character - - - - - 144 More, (šir Thomas) his gaiety at his death, to what
Merchant, worth and importance of his character 428 owing
Merchants of great benefit to the public . 69, 174 Mortality, the lover's bill of -
Mercy, whoever wants it has no taste of enjoyment 456 Mothers justly reproved for not nursing their own
Merit, no judgment to be formed of it from success 293 children

- 246
Valuable according to the application of it - 340 | Motion of the gods, wherein it differs from that of
Merry part of the world amiable

mortals, according to Heliodorus

- 309
• Messiah,' a sacred eclogue -

- 378 Motteux, (Peter) dedicates his poem on tea to the
The Jews mistaken notion of the Messiah's worldly

Spectator
grandeur - - - - - - - 610 Motto the effects of a handsome one
Metamorphoses, (Ovid's) like enchanted ground

Mourning : the signs of true mourning generally
Metaphor, when noble, casts a glory round it

misundersiood - - - -
Metaphors, when vicious

. 595/ The method of mourning considered
An instance of it .

- 595 Who the greatest mourners
Method, the want of it, in whom only supportable - 476 Mouse Alley doctor - - -
The use and necessity of it in writings

. 476 Much cry but little wool, to whom applied
Seldom found in coffee-house debates

- 476 | Muly Munuch, Emperor of Morocco, bis great intre-
Military education, a letter about it

pidity in his dying moments

• 349
Mill to make verses

Music banished by Plato out of his commonwealth 18
Miller, (James) his challenge to Timothy Buck

| Of a relative nature
Milton's Paradise Lost :' the Spectator's criticisms Music, (church) of the improvement of it . 405

and observations on that poem, 267, 273, 279, 285, It may raiso confused notions of things in the fancy 116
291, 297, 303, 309, 315

Recommended

- - - 630
His subject conformable to the talents of which he Musician, (burlesque) an account of one - 570

was master · : · · · ·
His fable a master-piece

- 315 NAKED shouldered

: 315
A continuation of the Spectator's criticism on Pa. Names of authors to be put to their works, the bard-

radise Lost' 327, 333, 339, 345, 351, 357, 863, 369 ships and inconveniencies of it
The moral of that poem, and length of time con Nature, a man's best guide

404
tained in the action

- 369 The most useful object of human reason 408
The vast genius of Milton

Her works more perfect than those of art to delight
His poem of Il Penseroso

. . 425 the fancy - - - - - - - 414
His description of the archangel & the evil spirits Yet more pleasant the more they resemble them (14
addressing themselves for the combat

- 463

More grand and august than those of art . 414
Mimickry, (art of) why we delight in it . . 416 Necessary cause of our being pleased with what is
Mind, (human) the wonderful naturo of it
- 554 great, new, and beautiful

• 413
Minister, a watchful one described

. 439 Needle work recommended to ladies
Minutius, his character - - -

. 422 A letter from Cleora against it
Mirth in a man ought always to be accidental . 196 Neighbourhoods of whom consisting
The awkward pretenders to it

358 Nemesis, an old maid, a discoverer of judgments - 483
Distinguished from cheerfulness

381 New or uncommon, why every thing that is so raises
Mirza, the vision of . . .

- 159 a pleasure in the imagination - - - 41
Mischief rather to be suffered than an inconvenience 564 What understood by the term with respect to
Misfortunes, our judgments upon them reproved - 48 objects - - - - - . . 412
Mixt wit described

Improves what is great and beautiful

.412
Mixt communion of men and spirits in Paradise, as Why a secret pleasure annexed to its idea . 413
described by Milton

Every thing so that pleases in architectura

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Niche excellent actove a sham one

- 102

- 286

No.

No.
Newberry, (Mr.) his rebus
- 59 Parties reign more in the country than town

- 126
New river, a project for bringing

Party zeal very bad for the face

. 57
house -

Party patches - - -

. 81
Nows, how the English thirst after it

Party scribblers reproved

- 125
Project for a supply of it

452 Party not to be followed with innocence . - 399
Of whispers -
457 Party prejudices in England

. 432
The pleasure of news. .
5 Passion relieved by itself .

- 520
Newton, (Sir Isaac) his noble way of considering Passionate people, their faults

.438
infinite space

Nat. Lee's description of it

438
Nicholas Hart, the annual sleeper

| Passions the conquest of them a difficult task
Nicodemuncio's letter to Olivia .

433/ The various operations of them
Nicolini, his perfection in music

. 405 The strange disorders bred by our passions when
Nicolini, (Signior his voyage on pasteboard

not regulated by virtue

- 215
His combat with a lion .

It is not so much the business of religion to extin-
Why thought to be a sham one
. 13 guish, as to regulate our passions

. 221
131 The use of the passions

- 255
Night, a clear one described
• 565 The passions treated of .

- 408
Whimsically described by William Ramsay - 582 What moves them in descriptions most pleasing - 418
Night walk in the country

In all men, but appear not in all

- 418
Nightingale, its music highly delightful to a man

Of hope and fear - - - -

. 471
in love

- - - 383 The work of a philosopher to subdue the passions 564
Nigranilla, a party lady, forced to patch on the Instances of their power - -

564
wrong side -

1 Passions of the fan, a treatise for the use of the au-
No, a word of great use to women in love matters - 625 1 thor's scholars - -
Novels, great infiamers to women's blood
- 365 | Patience, an allegorical discourse upon it

- 501
Novelty, the force of it .
- 626 Her power -

- 559
November, (month of described
- 246 Patrons and clients, a discourse on them

• 214
Nurses: the frequent inconveniencies of hired ones 425 Worthy patrons compared to guardian angels - 214
Nutmeg of delight, one of the Persian emperor's titles 160 Paul Lorrain, a design of his

. 338
Peace, some ill consequences of it

• 45
OATES, (Dr.) a favourite with some party ladies - 57 Pedantic humour . - - - -

. 618
Obedience of children to their parents, the basis of Podants, who so to be reputed

. 105
all government
189 The book-pedant the most supportable

- 105
Obscurity, the only defence against reproach - 101 Pedants in breeding as well as learning
Often more illustrious than grandeur
. 622 Peepers described - .

53
Obsequiousness in behaviour considered
- 386 Pecvish fellow described -

- 438
Ode (Laplander's] to his mistress
. 406 Penelope's web, the story of it

606
Economy, wherein compared to good breeding - 114 Penkethman, the comedian, his many qualifications 370
Ogler : the complete ogler
46. Penseroso,' (poem of] by Milton

- 425
Old maids generally superstitious
. 7 People, the only riches of a country .

- 200
Old Testament in a periwig
58 Pericles, his advice to the women

. 81
Omniamante, her character

Persecution in religious matters immoral

. 459
Opera, as it is the present entertainment of the Eng- Persian children, what learnt by them in thoir
lish stage, considered
dered .
schools

- 337
The progress it has made in our theatre

Persian soldier reproved for railing against an enemy 427
Some account of the French opera

9 Persians, their instruction of their youth
Opinion (popular described -
460! Their notions of parricide -

• 189
Opportunities to be carefully avoided by the fair sex 198 Person, the word defined by Mr. Locke - 578
Orator, what requisite to form one

- 633 | Persons, imaginary, not proper for an heroic poem 357
Orbicilla, her character - -
390 Petition of John-a-Nokes and John-a-Stiles .

- 577
Order, necessary to be kept up in the world - 219 Petition from a cavalier for a place, with his proton-
Ontentation, an inhabitant of the paradise of fools -

sions to it .

- 629
Otway commended and censured - - - 39 Petronius and Socrates, their cheerful behaviour
His description of the miseries of law suits

during their last moments, grounded on differ-
Overilo, a justice at Epping, offended at the company

ent motives -

- 349
of strollers for playing the part of Clodpate, and Petticoat, a complaint against the hoop petticoat - 127
making a mockery of one of the quorum - 48 8! Several conjectures upon it

- 127
Ovid, in what he excels - - - - - 467 | Compared to an Egyptian temple

- 127
His description of the palace of fame - - 439 Petticoat politicians, a seminary to be established in
His verses on making love at the theatre, translated

France - -
by Mr. Dryden - -

- 602 Pharamond, memoirs of his private life
How to succeed in his manner

. 6181 His great wisdom -
Outrageously virtuous, what women so called 266) Soine account of him and his favourite
Oxford scholar, his great discovery in a coffee-house 46 His edict against duels - - -

97

Phehe and Colin, an original poem by Dr. Byrom 603
PAINTER and tailor often contribute more than the Phidias, his proposal for a statue of Alexander 415
poet to the success of a tragedy

Phi!autia, a great votary - - - - - 79
Pamphilio, a good master .. .

- 137 Phillips, (Mr.) pastoral verses of his - - 400
Pamphlets, defamatory, detestable

His pastorals recommended by the Spectator - 528
Pantheon at Roine, how it strikes the imagination at Philopater's letter about his daughter's dancing - 466

the first entrance - - - - - - 415 Philosophers, why longer lived than other men · 195
Paradise of fools

Philosophy, the use of it - - - - - 7
• Paradise Lost' (Milton's) its fine image

Said to be brought hy Socrates down from heaven 10
Parents, their taking a liking to a particular profes-

The use of natural philosophy -

- 393
sion often occasions their sons to miscarry .

The authors of the new philosophy gratify and
Naturally fond of their own children - - 192 enlarge the imagination

420
Too mercenary in the disposal of their children in The boast of pagan philosophers that they exalt

marriage - - - - - - - 304 human nature
Too sparing in their encouragement to masters for Phocion, his behaviour at his death

- 133
the well educating their children
13 His notion of popular applause

- 188
Their care due to their children

His sayings of a vain promiser - - - 448
Parnassus, the vision of it - - - - - 514 Physic, the substitute of exercise or temperance - 195
Particles, (English) the honour done to them in the Physician and Surgeon, their different employment 16
late operas - - - - - - - 18

- 18 The physicians, a formidable body of men
Parties crept much into the conversation of the ladies 57 Compared to the British army in Caesar's time - 21

An instance of the malice of parties - - 125 Their way of converting oue distem per into another 25
'She dismal effects of a furious party spirit - 125 Physiognomy every man in some degree master of
It corrupes both our morals and judgment

- 1251

that art

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Picts, what woinen so called

· 41 Practice and example, their prevalency on youth - 337
No faith to be kept with them

- 41 Praise, the love of it implanted in us - - 38. 467
Picture pot so natural a representation as a statue 416!

.238

A generous mind the most sensible of it
What pleases most in one

. 4181 Why not freely conferred on men till dead
Pictures, witty, what pieces so called

When changed into fame
Piety an ornament to human nature

. 201| Prayers, Phænix's allegorical description of them to
Pindar's saying of Theron

. 467 Achilles in Homer .

. . . . 391
Pin-money condemned

- 2951 The folly and extravagance of our prayers in gen-
Pink thain to personate King Porus on an elephant 31 eral, make set forms necessary

-391

412
Pisistratus, the Athenian tyrant, his generous beha | Precipice, distant, why its prospect pleases

viour on a particular occasion - - - 527 Prediction, the many arts of it in use among the vulgar 505
Pitch-Pipe, the invention and use of it

228 Prejudice, the prevalency of it - -
Pittacus, a wise saying of his about riches

574 A letter about it, as it respects England
Pity, is love softened by gorrow

- 397 Prerogative, when and how asserted with honous - 480
That and terror leading passions in poetry . 418 | Pride, a great enemy to a fine face
The reasonableness of pity

. 588 A man crazed with pride a mortifying sight
Place and precedency more contested among women

A chiefspring of action in most men
of an inferior rank less than ladies of quality 119 Printing encouraged by politest nations in Europe 367
Places of trust, who most fit for them

. 469 Procrastination, from whence proceeding . 161
Why courted by men of generous principles . 469 | Procuress her trade-

The unreasonableness of party-pretences to places 629 Prodicus, the first inventor of fables . . .
Planets, to survey them fills us with astonishment 420 Professions, the three greatest ones overburdened
Planting recommended to country gentlemen

with practitioners

with practitioners
583, 589

. .

. . 21
Plato, his notion of the soul

- - - 90 /Projector, a short description of one
Wberein, according to him and his followers, the Promisers condemned

. 448
punishment of a voluptuous man consists - 0 Promises, (neglect of) through frivolous faleehood - 448
His account of Socrates's behaviour the morning | Pronunciation neccessary to an orator

• 541
he was to dio - - . - - -

Proper, (Wil) an honest tale bearer .

. 19
His description of the Supreme Being

Prospect, a beautiful one, delights the soul as much
His saying of labour

- 624 as a demonstation - - - - - - - 411
Players in Drury Lane their intended regulations 36 Wide ones pleasing to the fancy
Wherein to be condemned

• 502 Enlivened by rivers and falls of water
The Precedency settled among them

- 329
That of hills and vallies soon tires -

412
Playhouse, how improved in storms

- 592 Prospect of peace, a poem on that subject commen-
Pleaders few of them tolerable company
197 d ed by the Spectator - - -

5
Pleasant fellows to be avioded

- 469 Prosperity, to what compared by Seneca
Pleasantry, in conversation, the faults it covers - 462 Proverbs (the 7th chapter of) turned into verso
Pleasure when our chief pursuit, disappoints itself 151 Providence, demonstrative arguments for it .
The deceitfulness of pleasure -

- 151. Not to be fathomed by reasou
Pleasure and pain, a marriage proposed between Prudence, the influenco ic has on our good or ill for
them and concluded

1 tune in the world -
Pliny, the necessary qualifications for a fine speaker Psalm 114th translated -
according to that author - - - - 484 Psalmist against hypocrisy -

- 393
His letter to his wife's aunt Hispulla
5 Of Providence -

- 441
Plutarch, for what reproved by the Spectator 83 | Punch, out in the moral part

- 14
Poems in picture

- 58 Punchinello frequented more than the church
The chief things to be considered in epic poem
267 | Punishments in schools disapproved -

- 157
Several poems preserved for their similies

421 | Punning recommended by the practice of all ages -
Poetesses, (English) wherein remarkable - - 51! In what age the pun chiefly flourished .
Poetry has the whole circle of nature for its province 419 A famous university much infested with it -
Poets, (English) reproved

Why banished at present out of the learned world 61
Their artifices - - -

44 The definition of a pun
Bad poets given to envy and detraction - 253 Whose privilege

- 396
The chief qualification of a good poet

- 314 A pun of thought
The pains they should take to form the imagination 417 By whom punning is affected
Should mend Nature, and add to her beauties - 418 Punsters, their talents -

- 504
How much they are at liberty in it

. 418 Puss, speculations on an old and a young one
Polite imagination let into a great many pleasures Puzzle. (Tom) an eminent immethodical disputant - 476
the vulgar are not capable of

. - 411 Pyramids of Egypt . . - - - - 415
Politicians, the mischief they do

- 556 Pythagoras, his precepts about the choice of a course
Some at the Royal Exchange

• 568 of life - - - - - - - - 447
Politics of St. James's coffee-house, on the report of His advice to his scholars about examining at
the French king's death

night what they had done in the day.

-588
Of Giles's .

- 403
Of Jeuny Man's
- 408 QUACK bil! • • •


Or Will's

403 Doctors, the cheats of them
of the Temple

. 403 An essay against quacks by Dr. Z. Pearce . - 572
or Fish-street

- 403 Quakers, project of an act to marry them to the olive
of Cheapside

beauties
Of Garraway's
- 403 Qualities, what are truly valuable

- 240
Poll, a way of arguing
- 239, Quality no exemption from reproof

- 31
Polycarpus, a man beloved by every body .

Is either of fortune, body, or mind
Pontiguan, Mons.) his adventure with two women Queries in love answered - -
Poor, the scandalous appearance of them .

Question, a curious one started by a schoolman about
Pope, (Mr. his miscellany commended by

tbe choice of present and future happiness and
Spectator . . . . .

23 misery .

- - - 315
Popular applause, the vanity of it

- 188 Quidnunc, (Thos) his letters to the Spectator about
Posterity, its privilege

news - -
Poverty, the inconveniencies and mortifications usu. Quir, (Peter de) his letter to the Spectator about puns 306
ally attending it

- 150 Quixote, (Don) patron of the Sighers' Club.
The loss of merit
Powell, senior to act Alexander the Great on a RABELAIS, his device - - - - -
dromedary -

31 Rack, a knotty syllogism
His artifice to raise a clap

Raillery in conversation, the absurdity of it -
Powell, junior his great skill in motions

14 | Rainbow, the figure of one contributes to its megoifi-
His performance referred to the opera of Rina

cence as much as the colours to its beauty
and Armida
- .

14 Rake, a character of om
Power, despotic, an upanswerable argument against it 287 Raleigh, (Sir Walter) his opinion of woman kind - 510

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