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Funnel (Will) the toper, his character

569 Green-sickness, Sabina Rentfree's letter about it. 431
Futurity, the strong inclination a man has to know it 604 Grinning : a grinning prize

• 173
A weakness -
604 Grotto, verses on one

- 632
The misery of knowing it

604 Guardian of the fair-sex, the Spectator so - - 449
Gyges, and Aglaus, their story

- 610
GALLANTRY: wherein true gallantry consists - Gymnosophists, (Indian) the method used by them
Gaming, the folly of it

in the education of their disciples

- 337
Gaper, the sign of the gaper frequent in Amsterdam
Garden, the innocent delights of one

HABITS, different, arising from different professions 197
Part of Kensington Garden to be most admired - Hamadryads, the fable of them to the honour of trees 589
w what gardening may be compared to poetry -

Hamlet's reflections on looking upon Yonicks skull 404
Gardening, errors in it

Handkerchief, the great machine for moving pity in
Why the English gardens are not so entertaining L a tragedy - - - -

- 44
to the fancy as those in France and Italy 414 Handsome people generally fantastical - - 144
Observations concerning improvement both for be | The Spectator's list of some handsome ladies - 144
nefit and beauty

41 Happiness, (true) an enemy to pomp and noise • 15
Applied to education

The happiness of souls in heaven treated of - 600
Genclogy, a letter about

619) An arguinent that God has assigned us for it .600
Generosity not always to be commended - - 346 Hard words ought not to be pronounced right by well
Genius, what properly a great one

bred ladies - -

- 45
Gentry of England, generally speaking, in deb

Hardness of heart in parents towardis their children
Geography of a jest settled

most inexcusable - - -

- 181
Georgics, (Virgil's) the beauty of their subjects

Harlot, a description of one out of the Proverbs - 410
Germanicus, his taste of true glory

23 Harris, (Mr.) the organ-builder, his proposal - 552
Gesture, good in oratory

Harry Terset, and his lady ; their way of living - 100
Ghosts, warned out of the playhouse

Hate ; why a man ought not to hate even his enemies 125
The appearance of a ghost of great efficacy in

Head-dress, the most variable thing in nature - 98
English theatre

Extravagantly high in the fourteenth century . 98
What ghosts say should be a little discoloured

With what success attack od by a monk of that age 98
The description of them pleasing to the fancy - 419 Heads never the wiser for being bald

- 497
Why we incline to believe them - . . Health, the pleasures of the fancy more conducive
Not a village in England formerly without one.419 to it than those of the understanding

. 411
Shakspeare's the best .
. 419 Hearts, a vision of them

. 587
Gifts of fortune more valued than they ought to be 294

Heathen philosopher - -

- 150
Gigglers in church reproved

158 Heaven, its glory

- - - 580
Gipsies: an adventure between Sir Roger, the Spec-

Described by Mr. Cowley

- 500
tator, and some gipsies - - - - -

The votions several nations have of it

- 600
Giving and forgiving, two different things . . What Dr. Tillotson says of it - -

- 600
Gladiator's of Rome, what Cicero says of them

| Heaven and hell, the notions of, conformable to the
Gladio's dream

light of nature . -

- 447
Gladness of heart to be moderated and restrained, Heavens, verses on the glory of them

- 463
but not banished by virtue -

Hebrew Idioms run into English

. 405
Glaph yea, her story out of Josephus

THeirs and elder brothers spoiled in their education 123
Gloriana, the design upon her
423 Henpecked husbands described .

• 179
Glory, the love of it - - - .

Heraclitus, a remarkable saying of his

- 487
In what the perfection of it consists - - - 139 Hermit, his saying to a lewd young fellow -

- 575
How to be preserved . . .

172, 218 Herod and Mariamne, their story from Josephus - 171
Goat's milk, the effect it had upon a man bred with it Herodotus, wherein condemned by the Spectator - 483
God, the being of one the greatest of certainties - Heroes in English tragedy generally lovers

- 40
An instance of his exuberant goodness and mercy 519 Heroism, an essay upon it - -

- 601
A being of infinite perfections - - - - 513 | Hesiod's sayings of a virtuous life

- 447
Contemplation of his omnipresence & omniscience 565 | Heieroptic, who so to be called

. 250
He cannot be absent from us

565 Hilpa, the Chinese antediluvian princess, her story 584
Considerations on his ubiquity

Her letter to Shalum

. . . . 385
Good-breeding, the great revolution that has hap Historian, in conversation, who .

• 136
pened in that article -

The most agreeable talent of an historian

- 420
Good-humour, the necessity of it

1001 How history pleases the imagination - - - 420
Good-nature more agrceable in conversation than wit 169 Descriptions of battles in it seldom understood - 428
The necessity of it -

169 History, secret, an odd way of writing one - - 619
Born with us - -

. 169 Hobbes, (Mr.) his observations on laughter - - 47
A moral virtue

1 lis notions debase human nature -

- 586
An endless source of pleasure

6 Hobson, Tobias the Cainbridge carrier, the first man
Good-Dature and cheerfulness the two great orna-

in England who let out hackney-horses - 509
ments of virtue - - - - - - 2

| Hiy justice in his employment, and the success of it 509
Good sense and good-nature always go together • 437 Hockley in the Hole gladiators - - - - 436
Goosequill, (William) clerk to the lawyer's club

Homer : his excellence in the multitude and variety
Gospel gossips described

of his characters - -

. . . . 273
Goths, in poetry who

- - - - - 62 He degenerates sometimes into burlesque . 279
Government, what form of it the most reasonable 287 | His descriptions charm more than Aristotle's rea-
Grace at meals practised by the Pagans . . 458 soning - - - - -

• - 411
Gracefulness of action, the excellency of it - 292 Compared with Virgil

. 417
Grammar-schools, a common fault observed in them

When he is in his province
Grandeur and minuteness, the extremes pleasing to Honestus, the trader, his character

the fancy - - . - - - - 420 Honeycomb, (Will) his character
Grandmother, Sir Roger de Coverley's great, great, His discourse with the Spectator in the playhouse 4
great grandmother's receipt for a hasty-pudding

His adventure with a Pict
and a white-pot

. - - - - 109 Throws his watch into the Thames
Gratitude, the most plcasing exercise of the mind - His knowledge of mankind

. 105
A divine poem upon it - - - - - 453 His letter to the Spectator

- 131
Great men, the tax paid by them to the public - 101 His notion of a man of wit

• 151
Not truly known till some years after their death 101 His boasts

• 151
Greatness of objects, what understood by it, in the His artifice

• 156
pleasures of the imagination . - 412, His great insight into gallantry -

• 265
Greeks, a custom practised by thein
- - 1 His application to rich widows .

• 311
Greeks and Romans, the different methods observed His dissertation on usefulness of looking-glasses 325

by them in the education of their children - 313 His observation on the corruption of the age - 352
Greeks and Trojans, who so called .

239 He gives the club a brief account of his amours
Green, why called in poetry the cheerful colour 3871 and disappointments

• 359

408 Ben

196 Honin England wholement, and

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His adventure with Sukey

.410

Awaken the faculties of the mind, without fatiguing
Resolved not to marry without advice of friends 475 or perplexing it - -
His translation from the French of an epigrain

More conducive to health than those of the un-
written by Martial, in honour of the beauty of

derstanding - - - - -
his wife Cleopatra

- 490 Raised by other senses as well as the sight
His letters to the Spectator

- . 499, 511

The cause of them not to be assigned
Marries y country girl

Works of art not so perfect as those of nature
Ilonour to be described only by negatives - . 35 to entertain the imagination - -

• 414
The genealogy of true honour

The secondary pleasures of the fancy -
And of (alse honour

The power of it . . .
Wherein commendable -

. 99 Whence its secondary pleasures proceed - - 116
And when to be exploded -

99 Of a wider and more universal nature than those
Honours in this world under no regulation . 219 it has when joined with sight - - - 418
Hoods, coloured, a now invention

. 267

How poetry contributes to its pleasures - - 419
Hope, passion of, treated .. .

How historians, philosophers, & other writers 420, 421
Folly of it when mixemployed on temporal objects 535 The delight it takes in enlarging itself by degrees,
Instances in the fable of Alnaschar, the Persian

as in the survey of the earth, and the universe 491
glass-man

- - - - - - 5351 When it works from great thing to little -
Hopes aud fears, necessary passions

Where it falls short of the understanding -
Horace, takes fire at every hint of the Iliad and How affected by similitudes -

. 421
Odyssey-

As liable to pain as pleasure; how much of either
His recommendatory letter to Claudius Nero, in 1 it is capable of .

- 421
behalf of his friend Septimus - - - - 493 The power of the Almighty over it

- 421
Hotspur, (Jeffrey, Esq.) his petition from the Imagining, the art of it in general
country intirmary

Imma the daughter of Charles the Great, her story 191
Hudibras, a description of his beard

Iminortality of the soul, arguments in proof of it - 111
Human nature, the same in all reasonable creatures. The benefits arising from a contemplation of it - 210
The best study.

- 408 Impertinent and trifling persons, their triumph - 432
Humanity not regarded by the fine gentlemen of Impertinents, several sorts of the described 148, 163
the age . -

520 Impudence gets the better of modesty - - - 2
Humour, (goodthe best companion in the country 424 Inpudence: an impudence committed by the eyes - 20
The two extremes of humour

- 617

Definition of English, Scotch & Irish impudence 20
Burlesque

- 616

Recommended by some as good breeding - - 31
Pedantic .

. 617 Distinguished from assurance -
Hunting the use of it

. 116 Most proper means to avoid the imputation of it - 300
Reproved - -

. 583! Mistaken for wit .
Husband, an ill custom among them .

- 178 Independent minister the behaviour of one at his ex-
Rules for marrying them by the Widow's club - 561 amination of a scholar, who was in election to be
Qualities necessarry to make good ones

adinitted into a college of which he was governor 194
Hush, (Peter) his character -

- 457 Indian Kings, some of their observations during their
Hymen a revengeful deity -

- 530 stay here - - -
Hymn, David's pastoral one on Providenco - - 441 Indifference in marriage, not to be tasted by sensible

On gratitude - - - - - - - 453 spirits
On the glories of heaven and earth ..

. 463 Indigo, the merchant, a man of great intelligence - 135
Hypocrisy, honor and justice dope by it to religion 243 Indiscretion, more hurtful than ill nature . . 3
The various kinds of hypocrisy

399 Ipdisposition; a man under any, whether real or ima-
To be preferred to opeu impiety . - • 4581 ginary, ought not to be adınitted into company 113

Indolence, what

. . . .
IAMBIC verse, the tnost proper for Greek tragedies 39 An enemy to virtue - - - -

- 316
James, how polished by love

1 Infidelity, another term for ignorance
Jane, (Mrs.) a great pickthank - - - - 272 Infirmary, one for good humour . . 429, 437, 440
lapsis's cure of Æneas, a translation of Virgil by A further account of it froin the country - • 440

Mr. Dryden - - - - - - . 572 Ingolstan, (Charles) of Barbican, his cures
Ichneumon, a great destroyer of crocodiles' eggs - 126 Ingratitude, a vice inseparable from a lustful miod 491
Ideas, how a whole set of them hang together - 416 Initial letters, the use party writers make of them 567
Idiot the story of one by Dr. Plot - -

7 An instance of it
Idiots, in great request in most of the German courts 7! Criticisms upon it

Stis
Idle and innocent, few know how to be so

. 40 Injuries, how to be measured
Idle world - - - - -
- 624 Inkle and Yarico, their story .

. 11
Idleness, a great distemper -

• 316 Innocence, not quality, an exomption from reproo
Idol : coffee-house idols

. 87 Inquisitive tempers exposed
Idolatry, the offspring of mistaken devotion . 20 Iustinct, the power of it in brutes

. 120
Idols, who of the fair sex so called

• 73 The several degrees of it in different animals - 519
Jealousy described

- 170 Integrity, great care to be taken of it - - - 557
How to be allayed

- 171 Interest, often a promoter of persecution - -
An exquisite torment

- 1781 The way to promote our interest in the world . 394
Jest, how it should be uttered

- 616 Intrepidity of a just good man taken from Horace 615
Jesuits, their great sagacity in discovering the talent Invention, the most painful action of the mind . 457

of a young student - - - - - - 307 Invitation, the Spectator's to all artificers, as well as
Jews, considered by the Spectator in relation to

philosophers, to assist him - - - 428, 442
their number, dispersion, and adherence to their

A general one

- - - - - 444
religion - - - - - - - - 495 John-a-Nokes and John-a-Stiles, their petition - 577
The reasons assigned for it

. 495 | Jolly, (Frank, Esq.) his memorial from the country
The veneration paid by them to the name of God 531 infirmary - - . - - - - 429
Jezebels, who so called

• 175 | Jonson, (Ben) an epitaph written by him on a lady 33
Jilt, a penitent one .

• 401 Journal: a week of a deceased citizen's presented
Jilts described

. 1871 by Sir Andrew Freeport to the Spectator's club 317
Iliad, the reading of it like travelling through a

The use of such a journal - -
country uninhabited
- 417 Iras, her character - - - -

• 404
Ni nature an imitator of zeal
. 185 Irish gentlemen, widow bunters

- 561
Imaginary beings in poetry

- 419 Irony, who deal init - -
lustances in Ovid, Virgil and Milton -
. 419 Irresolution, from whence arising

. 151
Imagination, its pleasures in some respects equal to Irus's fear of poverty, and effects of it

. 114
those sf the understanding, in some preferable 41 1 The great artifice of Irus .
Their extent -
. - - 411 Isadas, the Spartan, his valour .

564
The advantages of the pleasures of imagination - 411 | Italian writers, florid and wordy -
What is meant by them

411 Julian, the emperor, an excellent passage out of his
Two kiuds of them

Carsars, relating to the imitation of the gods -

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No.

No.
July and August (the months of] described

- 425 Letter from King Latinus
June month of described - -

- 425 From Tho. Kimbow
Jupiter, his first proclamation about griefs and ca-

From Will Fashion to his would-be acquaintance 24
| lamities • • • •

- 558 From Mary, Tuesday on the same subject - - 24
His second

5591

From a Valetudinarian to the Spectator - • 25
His just distribution of them -

- 559 From some persons to the Spectator's clergyman - 27
Jupiter Ammon answer of his oracle to the Athenians 207 From one who would be inspector of the sign-posts
Justice, to be esteemed as the first quality in one who From the master of the show at Charing-cross
is in a post of power and direction -

From a inember of the Amorons Club at Oxford • 30
The Spartans famous for it -

From a membor of the Ugly Club -

From a gentleman to such ladies as are professed
KENNET, Dr. his account of country wakes

beauties - - - - -
Kimbow, (Thomas states his case in a letter to the

From the Spectator to T. D. containing an intend-
Spectator - - - - - - - 24 ed regulation of the playhouso
*King Lear' a tragedy, suffers in the alteration • 40 | Froin the play-house thunderer
Kiseing-dances censured - - - -

From the Spectator to an affected very witty man
Kitty, a famous town girls

. 187 From a married man, wita a complaint that his
Kuowledge, the pursuit of it long but not tedious.

wife painted
The only means to extend life beyond its natural From Abraham Froth, a member of the Hebdoma-
dimensions

. 941

dal Meeting in Oxford • -
The main sources of knowledge

- 287 From a husband plagued with a gospel-gossip
Ought to be communicative -

- 379 From an ogling-master-
Rules for knowledge of one's self

- 399 From the Spectator, to the president and fellows of

the Ugly Club
LABOUR, bodily, of two kinds ..

- 115 From Hecatissa to the Spectator
Lacedæmoniaus, delicacies in their sense of glory • 188 From an old Bean -
A form of prayer used by them .

• 207

Froin Epping, with account of a companyof strollers
Ladies not to mind party

- 607 From a lady, complaining of a passage in the Fu.
Lady's library described

- 37 neral
Ladylove, (Bartholomew] his petition to Spectator 334 From Hugh Goblin, president of the Ugly Club
Laertes, his character in distinction to that of Irus - 114 From Q. R. concerning laughter
Lætitia and Daphne, their story - -

- 33 The Spectator's Answer - -
Lampoons, written by people that cannot spell

From R. B. to the Spectator, with a proposal rela-
Witty lampoons inflict wouuds that are incurable 23 ting to the education of lovers.
The inhuman barbarity of the ordinary scribblers - From Anna Bella
of lampoons -

From a splenetic gentleman
• Lancashire Witches,' a comedy, censured - - 141 From a reformed starer, complaining of a peeper
Landscape, a pretty one - - -

.4141 From King Latinus -
Language, English, much adultorated during the war 165 From a gentleman at Cambridge, an account of a
Language, (licentious) the brutality of it - - 4001 new sect of philosophers called Loungers
Languages, (European] cold to the Oriental - - 405 From Celinene -
Lapirius, his great generosity -

From a father, complaining of the liberties taken
Lapland ode translated - -

in country-dances
Larvati, who so called among the ancients - - From James to Betty
Lath, (Squire has a good estate, which he would

To the Spectator, from the Ugly Club at Cambridge
part withal for a pair oflegs to his mind - - 32 From a whimsical young lady - -
Latimer, the martyr, his behaviour at a conference From B. D. desiring a catalogue of books for the

with the Papists - - - - - - 465 female library
Latin of great use in a country auditory . - 221 From Rosalinda, with a desire to be admitted into
Laughter, [immoderate a sign of pride -

the Ugly Club
A counterpoise to the spleen . -

.249 From T. T. complaining of the Idols in coffee
Wbat persons the most accomplished to raise it - 249 houses -
A poetical figure of laughter out of Milton - 249 From Pbilo Britannicus on corruption of sorvants 89
The distinguishing faculty in man

• 494 From Sam. Hopewell
Indecent in any religious assembly

- 630 From Leonora, reminding the Spectator of the
Law-suits, the misery of them

- 456

catalogue - - .
Lawyers divided into the peaceable and the litigious 21 From B. D. concerning real sorrow
Both sorts described -

From Annabella, reoommending the bishop of
Leaf (greenswarms with millions of animals - 42 Cambray's Education of a Daughter
Learning ought not to claim any merit to itself, but From Tom Trusty, a servant, containing an ac-
upon the application of it

count of his life and services
The design of learning -

- - 3 From the master of the fan exercise
To be made advantageous to meanest capacities - 353 From - , against the equestrian order of ladies 104
Men of learning, wbo take to business, best for it - 469 From Will Wimblo to Sir Roger de Coverley, with
Highly necessary to a man of fortune - - - 506 a jack - -

-

-
-

-
-

-
-

-

- - - 108
Lee, the poet, well turned for tragedy - - - 39 To the Spectator, from complaining of the
Leo X. a great lover of buffoons and coxcombs - 497 new petticoat

- - 127
In what manner reproved for it by a priest -

From a lawyer on the circuit, with an accoant of
Leonora, her character - -

the progress of the fashions in the country - 129
The description of her country seat.

From Will Honeycomb -

- 131
Leontine and Eudoxus, their great friendship and ad-

From George Trusty, thanking the Spectator for
vantages - - - - - 123 the great benefit he has received from his works 134
Leopold, last cmperor of that name, an expert joiner 353] From William Wiseacre who desires his daughter
Lesbia's letter to the Spectator, giving an account

may learn the exercise of the fan

- 134
how she was deluded by her lovor - - - 611 From a professed liar-

• 136
Letter to Spectator, complaining of masquerade - 28 From Ralp Valet, the faithful servant of a perverse
From the opera-lion

- 141 master - - - - - - - - 137
From the under-sexton of Covent-garden parish - 14 From Patience Giddy, next thing to a lady's woman 137
From the undertaker of the masquerade

From Lydia Novell, complaining of her lover's
From one who had been to see the opera of Rinaldo,

conduct - - - - - - - 140
and the puppct-show

Froun R. D. concerning the corrupt taste of the
From Charles Lillie

- 16 age, and the reasons of it - - - - 140
From the president of the Ugly club
17 Frome Betty Santer about a wager

. 140
From S. C. with a complaint against the Starers - From Parthenope, who is angry with the Spectator
From Tho. Prone, who acted the wild boar that was

for meddling with the ladies' petticoats

- 140
killed by Mrs. Tofts -

From- , upon drinking

- 140
From William Screnc and Ralph Simple

22! From Rachael Basto, concerning female gamesters 140
From an actor

From Parthenia
VOL. II.

:

- 21

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- 178

No.

No.
Letter from a, containing a reflection on a come Letter from a lover, with an hue-and-cry after his

dy called "The Lancashire Witches' - - 141 mistress's heart . . . . - • 208
From Andromache, complaining of the false no-

From J. D. concerning the immortality of the soul 210
tion of gallantry in love, with some letters from

From Melissa, who has a drone to her husband .211
her husband to her - - - - - 142 From Barnaby Brittle, whose wife is a filly . 211
From - , concerning wagerers . . . 145

From Josiah Henpeck, married to a Grimalkia 211
From — , complaining of impertinents in coffee-

From Martha Tempest, complaining of her witty
houses

busband - - - - . - - 211
From , complaining of an old bachelor • 145 From Anthony Freeman, the Hennecked - 212
From — , concerning the skirts of men's coats - 1451 From Tom Meggot, giving the Spectator an ac.
From , on the reading of the Coinmon Prayer 147 count of the success of Mr. Freeman's lecture - 216
From the Spectator to a dancing outlaw . .148 From Kitty Termagrant giviug an account of the
From the same to a danh visitant . . . 148

. 148 |
Romp's club

- -217
To the Spectator, from Silvia, a widow, desiring From , complaining of his indelicate mistress 217
his advice in the choice of a husband -

From Susannah Frost an old maid

- 217
The Spectator's answer

From A. B. a parson's wife -

- 217
To the Spectator, from Simon Honeycomb, an ac-

From Henrietta to her ungracious lover
count of bis inodesty, impudence, and marriage 154 To the Spectator from , on false wit - 22
From an Idol that keeps a coffee-house - - 155 From T. D. concerning salutation - - - 220
From a milliner, coinplaining of her customers - 155

From inquiring the reason why men of parts
From , with a reproof to the Spectator : 1 are not the best managers
From , concerning the ladies' visitauts - - 158 From Escnlapius, about the lover's leap
From , complaining of the behaviour of per-

From Athenias, and Davyth ap Skenkin, o
sons in church

- - - - - - 158 same subject - -
From a woinan's man

- 158 From W. B. the projector of the pitch pipe - 23
From , with a description of a country wake 161

Trom , on education - -

. 230
From Leonora, who had just lost her lover 163 From - on the awe which attends some speak-
From a young officer to his father - -

165

ers in public assemblies .
To the Spectator, from a castle builder - . 167 From Pailonous, on free-thinkers -
From- , concerning tyranny of school masters 168 From -

on marriage, and the husband's
From T. S. a school boy at Richmond

168 conduct to his wife . .
From , concerning impertinents

From Tristissa, who is married to a fool

236
From Isaac Hedgeditch, a poacher

- 168 From T. S. complaining of some peoples behaviour
To the Spectator from with a complaint a-

in divine service

imi

: . 236
gainst a Jezebel - -

- . 175

From- , with a letter translated from Aris.
From ----, who had been popplused by a butt - 175 tenetus - - - - - - - - 29
From Jack Modish, of Exeter, about fashions - 175 From a citizen, in praise of his benefactor - 240
From Nathaniel Henroost, a henpecked busband 176 From Rustic Sprightly, a country gentleman, com-
From Celinda, about Jealousy

plaining of a fashion introduced in the country
From Martha Housewife to her husband - 178 by a courtier newly arrived

- - - 240
To the Spectator, from with an account of From Charles Easy, reflecting on the behaviour
a whistling match at the Bath

of a sort of bean at Philaster

- 940
• From Philarithmus, displaying the vanity of Lew-

From Asteria, on the absence of lovers - - 241
is XIV's conquests

. - 180

From Rebecca Ridinghood, complaining of an ill
From , who had married herself without her

bred fellow-traveller .
father's consent

• 181

From from a poor weaver in Spitalfields 22
From Alice Treadneedle, against wenching

From Abraham Thrifty, guardian to two learned
From in the round house

nieces

- - - - - - - 242
From , coucerning Nicholas Hart, the annual From -

on Raphael's cartoons

.244
slecper

From Constantia Field, on the ninth species of
From Charles Yellow against jilts

women, called Apes - - - - - 244
From a gentleman to a lady, to whom he had for-

From Timothy Doodle, a lover of blind-map's-buff 245
merly been a lover, and by whom he had been

From J. B. on the several ways of consolation made
highly commended . - - - - 189 use of by absent lovers
From a father to his son

- 1891 From Troilus, a declared enemy to the Greeks - 945
To Spectator, from Rebecca Nettletop, a town lady 190 From

, on the nursing of children - 946
From Eve Afterday, who desires to be kept by the From T.B. being a desertation on the eye. - 950
Spectator

- - - 190 From Abraham Spy, on a new invention of per
From a bawdy-house inhabitant, complaining of

spective glasses for the use of starers - - 250
their visitors

- 190

From Mary Heartfree, describing the powerful
From Ceorge Gosling about a ticket in the lottery 19 effets of the eye
A letter of consolation to a young gentleman who

From Barbata Crabtree, to know if she may not
has lately lost his father - - - - 191 make use of a cudgel on her sot of a busbaod - 252
To the Spectator from a husband complaining of a From a lawyer whose wife is a great orator -952
heedless wife - - -

19 From Lydia to Harriet, a lady newly married - 254
From-, complaining of a fantastical friend - 1 Harriet's answer - - - - - - 854
From J. B. with advice to the Spectator -, - 196| To the Spectator, from a gentleman in love with a
From Biddy Loveless, who is enamoured with two

beauty without fortune
young gentlemen at once . - - - 196| From Ralph Crotchet, for a theatre of ease to be
From Statira to Spectator, with one to Oroondates 199 erected - - - - - - -
From Susan Civil, servant to another lady, desiring

From Mr. Clayton, &c . . . . . 38
Spectator's remarks upon voluntary counsellors 202 Erom Jack Alterday, an old bachelor, gran dend
From Tho. Smoky, servant to a passionate master 202 to all pleasures but that of being worth 50,0001 - 260
From a bastard, complaining of his condition as such 303 From a lover with an enclosed letter to his humour.
From Belinda to the Southades

- 204 some mistress - - - . - .960
From J. D. to bis coquette mistress

• 204 From a father, discoursing on the relative duties
From a lady to a gentleman, copfossing her love 204 · betwixt parents and their children
From angry Phillis to her lover

- 204 From a mother to her undutiful son
From a lady to her husband, an officer in Spain 204 The son's answer - - - - - - 283
To the Spectator, from Belicda, complaining of a

To the Spectator, from Richard Estcourt, with one
female seducer - - - - - - 205 enclosed from Sir Roger de Coverley

- 21
From a country clergyman, against an affected

From James Easy, who had his nose abused in the
singing of the Psalios in Church - - 205 pit - - - - - - - - 205
From Robin Goodfellow, containing the correction

From A. B. on the mercenary views of persons
of an errata in Sir William Temple's rule for

when they marry

- - -

-
drinking - - - - - - - 205 From Anthony Gape, who had the misfortune to
From Mary Mcanwell, about visiting - 208

run his nose against a post, while he was staring
From a shopkeeper, with thanks to the Spectator 208 at a heality -

24

Friedaily

- 330

No.

No.
Letter from

about the now-fashioned hoods 269 Letter from Toby Rent free, with a complaint
From one at Oxford in love with Patetia -

against Signior Nicolini . .

- - 314
From Tom Trippet, on a Greek quotation in a for From M. W. on the education of young gentle-
mer Spectator - - - - -

Women

314
From C. D. on Sir Roger's return to town - 271 From Samuel Slack on idleness

- 316
Froin S. T. who has a show in a box, of a man, a From Clitander to Cleone

- 316
woman, and a horse-

To the Spectator, with an account of the amours
From Cleanthes, complaining of Mrs. Jane, an old

of Escalus an old beau . .

- 313
maid, and a pickthank

272 From Dorinda, complaining of the Spectator's
From
, with an enclosed letter from a bawd
partiality -

- 319
to a noble lord - - - - - -

From Will Sprightly, a man ofimodo, on fashions - 319
From Frank Courtly, reproving the Spoctator for From ---, complaining of female court, called

some freedoms he had taken - - - 276 The Inquisition ou Moids and Bachelors - 320
From Celia, incensed at a gentleman who had

The power and management of this inquisition - 3:20
Dared the words • Justy follow' in her presence 276. From N. B. a member of the Lazy Club - 320
From Pucclla, kept by an old bachelor . .

To the Spectator, from Octavia, married to an un
From Hezekiah Broadbrin, accusing the Specta-

grateful husband - - - - - - 322
tor for not keeping his word

.
From Clarinda, with her journal -

- 323
From Terraminta, on the arrival of a Mademoiselle, From Philanthropos, account of the Mohock Club 324

completely dressed, from Paris - . · 277 From a countryman to her he very much respects,
From Betty Cross-stitch, owner of Mademoiselle 2 Mrs. Margaret Clark -

.324
From a shopkeeper, whose wife is too learned for From R. T. to Spectator upon a passage in Milton 325

him . - - - - - - - 278 From a country gentleinan, under the misfortune
From Florinda, who writes for Spectator's advice

of having a fine park and an only daughter - 326
in the choice of a husband after she is married - From Mrs. Mary Comfit, at Mile end Green - 326
From Clayton, &c. on the same subject as their

From T. B. complaining of his wife's expensive
former letter - - - - - - 278 longings during her pregnancy - - - 326
From Jenny Simper, complaining of the parish, From a married gentleman, who is in a fair way

clerk who has overdecked the church with greens 282 of being undone by his virtuous, lovely wife - 328
From the clerk in his own justification

- 284 From S. P. recommending the patronage of young
From concerning false delicacy

- 286/ modest men to sucla as are able to countenance
From Philobrune, of Cambridge, inquiring which

and introduce them into the world - -
is inost beautiful, a fair or a brown complexion 286 From James Discipulus, complaining of the near-
From Melvina, on male jilts . . . . 288 ness of his father as a great discouragement to
From Peter Motteux, an author, turned dealer - 2881 him in the course of his studies - - - 330
From George Powell, who plays the part of Ores-

From Jack Lightfoot, an account of his sweaters 333
tes in a new tragedy, the Distrest Mother' - From three country virtuous virgins, who are am-
From Sophia to know if the gentleman she saw in

bitious of the characters of very good wives - 332
the Park with a short face was the Spectator - 220 From the author of a history of dancing - - 334
The Spectator's answer

. . . - 2901 From a young man, complaining of an ill custom
To Spectator, from Jezebel a woman poor & proud 292 hc has observed among old men - - - 336
From Josiah Fribble, on pin-money . - 295 From Rebecca the distressed, complaining of a
From J. M. advising the Spectator to prefix no

club of female rakes - - - - - 336
more Greek mottos to his papers - - - 296 From-, some further thoughts on education 337, 353
From Aurelia Careless, concerning the use of the From Physibulus, occasioned by the Epilogue to
window of a beautiful lady .

- - 206) · "The Distrest Mother'
The Distro

- .
From Euphues desiring the Spectator's advice - 396 From Philomcides, answer to the foregoing letter 24
From Susannah Lovebane, against lampooners - 296 From an officer, concerning Sylvana's conduct in
Froin Charity Frost - -
- 296 the absence of her husband -

340
From John 'Trot

296 Froin Jack Freclove to his mistress, written in the
From Chastity Loveworth on the general notion

person of a monkey -

- 343
men have of the other sex -

To the Spectator, from Epicure Mammon, a great
From Sir J. Enville, married to a woman of quality 299 trencherman - - - - - - 344
From Susannah Loveworth, on the behaviour of From--, complaining of an extravagant cus-

married people before company - - - 300 tom among some women, of taking snuff - 344
From Philanthropos, on the terms of conversation

From Taw Waw Ebeu Zan Kalader, Emperor of
with the fair sex . . . . . 300 the Mobocks, with a manifesto

. 347
From Miranda, on valctudinary friendship - 3 From Mary against detraction

- 348
From D. G. thanking the Spectator for his criti-

From Hotspur, with the description of a devotee 354
cism on Milton - - - - - - 300 From Sophrosunius, complaining of the impudent
To Chloe, from her lover, giving her an account of

behaviour of people in the streets - - - 354
his dreams

From in behalf of a genteel dress - - 360
From Clitander, a silent lover

From John Shallow who had lately been at a con-
From Parthenissa, whose face is damaged by the

cert of cat calls - - - - - - 360
small pox . - - - - - - 306 From l'om Pottle, in commendation of Brooke and
From Corinna to Amilcar, on the same occasion - 306 Hellier - - - - - - - 362
Amilcar's answer

306From Will Cymon, with an account of the im-
From , on the education of children

. 307 provements wrought in him by love and the
From Mules Palfrey, with a project for the better

character of his mistress

- 362
regulating of matches - - - - - 308 From Philip Houeywood upon travel - - 364
From a tradesman married to a woman of quality - 308 From Robin Bridegroom, in Birchin-lane, com-
From Reader Gentle on a new paper called "The

plaining of a set of drums that awakened him
Historian,' - -

. . 308 with their thunder the morning after he was
From Elizabeth Sweepstakes, complaining of John

married - - - - - - - 364
Trot, the dancer

From Altamira, a prude

- 364
From Biddy Dough-bake, who, having been bid to From __, with the translation of a Lapland song 366
love, cannot unlove . .

- .310

From Constantia Comb-brush, complaining that
From Dick Lovesick, in love with a lady whose

her mistress gives her cast off clothes to others 366
fortune will not pay off his debts by 5001. - 310 From Paul Regnaud to his friend on the death of
From a discarded lover, with a letter to him from

Madame de Villacerfe - - - - 368
his mistress, and his answer - - - - 310

3101 To Spectator, from on whims & humourists 371
From Philanthropos, on a tale-bearer - 310 From Ralp Belfry, in coinmondation of Mr. Pow.
From Tim Watchwell, on fortune stealers - 311 ell, master of the motion •

- - 372
From J. O. on the expression used by several of From Humphrey Transfer, on a moving club of

the clergy in their prayers before sermon - 312 parish clerks - -
From further thoughts on education - 314 From H. R. complaining of the lawyer's club - 372
From Bob Harmless, complaining of his mistress 3141 From Michael Gander, on the day watchman and
From John Trot, dosiring the Spectator's advice 3141 bis goose

- 3765

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