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tion which is not marked out in an human the supreme model of all perfection. It would soul, it belongs in its fulness to the divine pa- likewise quicken our desires and endeavours of ture.

uniting ourselves to him by all the acts of reliSeveral eminent philosophers have imagined|gion and virtue. that the soul, in her separate state, may have such an habitual homage to the Supreme new faculties springing up in her, which she Being would, in a particular manner, banish is not capable of exerting during her present from among us that prevailing impiety of union with the body; and whether these facul- using his name on the most trivial occaties may not correspond with other attributessions. in the divine nature, and open to us hereafter I find the following passage in an excellent new matter of wonder and adoration, we are sermon, preached at the funeral of a gentlealtogether ignorant. This, as I have said be-man* who was an honour to his country, and fore, we ought to acquiesce in, that the So- a inore diligert as well as successful inquirer vereign Being, the great author of nature has, into the works of nature than any other our in him all possible perfection, as well in kind nation has ever produced. He had the proas in degree: to speak according to our me- foundest veneration for the great God of hes. thods of conceiving, I shall only add under ven and earth that I ever observed in any per. this head, that when we have raised our no- son. The very name of God was never mention of this Infinite Being as high as it is pos- tioned by him without a pause and a visible sible for the mind of man to go, it will fall stop in his discourse ; in which one, that knew infinitely short of what he really is. “There him most particularly above twenty years, is no end of his greatness.' The most exalted has told me that he was so exact, that he does creature he has made is only capable of ador-not remember to have observed him once to ing it, none but himself can comprehend it. fail in it.'

The advice of the son of Sirach is very just Every one knows the veneration which was and sublime in this light. “By his word all paid by the Jews to a name so great, wonderthings consist. We may speak much, and yet ful, and holy. They would not let it enter come short: wherefore in sum he is all. How even into their religious discourses. What shall we be able to magnity him ? for he is can we think of those who make use of so great above all his works. The Lord is ter-tremendous a name in the ordinary expresrible and very great; and marvellous in bis sions of their anger, mirth, and most imperpower. When you glorify the Lord, exalt him tinent passions? of those who admit it into as much as you can; for even yet will he far most familiar questions and assertions, ladiexceed. And when you exalt him, put forth crous phrases, and works of humour ? not to all your strength, and be not weary ; for you mention those who violate it by solemn perjucan dever go far enough. Who hath seen him, ries! It would be an affront to reason to enthat he might tell us ? and who can magnify deavour to set forth the horror and profane. him as he is ? There are yet hid greater things ness of such a practice. The very mention than these be, for we have seen but a few of of it exposes it sufficiently to those in whom his works.'

the light of nature, not to say religion, is net I have here only considered the Supreme utterly extinguished. Being by the light of reason and philosophy. If we would see him in all the wonders of his mercy, we must have recourse to revela- No. 532.7 Monday, November 10, 1712. tion, which represents him to us not only as infinitely great and glorious, but as infinitely

- Fungor vice cotis, acutum

Reddere quæ ferrum valet, exsors ipsa secandi. good and just in his dispensations towards

Hor. Ars Poct. ver. 304, man. But as this is a theory which falls under

I play the whetstone: useless and unfit every one's consideration, though indeed it!

To cut myself, I sharpen others wit. Creeck can never be sufficiently considered, I shall here only take notice of that habitual worship

It is a very honest action to be studious to and veneration which we ought to pay to this produce other men's merit; and I make no Almighty Being. We should often refresh our scruple of saying, I have as much of this temminds with the thought of him, and annihilate per as any man in the world It would not ourselves before him; in the contemplation of be a thing to be bragged of, but that it is what our own worthlessness, and of his transcend- any man may be master of, who will take ent excellency and perfection. This would pains enough for it. Much observation of the imprint in our minds such a constant and unworthiness in being pained at the excellence uninterrupted awe and veneration as that of another, will bring you to a scorn of your which I am here recommending, and which self for that unwillingness; and when you is in reality a kind of incessant prayer, and

praver and have got so far, you will find it a greater pleareasonable humiliation of the soul before him sure than you ever before knew to be zealous who inade it.

in promoting the fame and welfare of the This would effectually kill in as all the little praise-worthy. I do not speak this as preseeds of pride, vanity, and self-conceit, which tending to be a mortified self-denying man, are apt to shoot up in the minds of such but as one who had turned bis ambition into whose thoughts turn more on those compara- a right channel. I claim to myself the merit tive advantages which they enjoy over some of their fellow-creatures, than on that infinite See bishop Burpet's Sermon, preached at the funeral distance which is placed between thers and of the formonrable Robert Boyle.

thus rallied, and reduced into regular bodies, ence to the heroic, as comic writers to their I fatter myself that I shall make no despica- serious brothes in the drama. ble figure at the head of them.

By this short table of laws order is kept up, • Whether these rules, which have been re- and distinction preserved, in the whole repubceived time out of mind in the commonwealth lic of letters. of letters, were not originally established with an eye to our paper-manufacture, I shall No 530.] Friday, November 7, 1712. leave to the discussion of others; and shall

Sic visum Veneri; Cui placet impares only remark further in this place, that all Formas atque animos sub juga ahenea printers and booksellers take the wall of one Savo mittere cum joco.

Hor. Od. xxxiii. Lib. 1. 10. another according to the above-mentioned merits of the authors to whom they respec

Thus Venus sports; the rich, the base,

Unlike in fortune and in facc, tively belong.

To disagreeing love provokcs; I come now to that point of precedency

When cruelly jocose, which is settled among the three learned pro She ties the fatal noose, fessions by the wisdom of our laws. I need And bids unequals to the brazen yokes.-Crecch. not here take notice of the rank which is al

1 It is very usual for those who have been lotted to every doctor in each of these proses-.

severe upon marriage, in some part or other sions, who are all of them, though not so high of their lives, to enter into the fraternity which as knights, yet a degree above 'squires ; this they have ridiculed, and to see their raillery last order of men, being the illiterate body of ra

return upon their own heads. I scarce ever the nation, are consequently thrown togetherli

ther knew a woman-hater that did not, sooner or in a class below the three learned professious.

later, pay for it. Marriage, which is a blessing I mention this for the sake of several rural

to another man, falls upon such an one as a 'squies, whose reading does not rise so high

judgment. Mr. Congreve's Old Bachelor is as to The present State of England, and

set forth to us with much wit and humour, as who are often apt to usurp that precedency

hey an example of this kind. In short, those who which by the laws of their country is not due)

"have most distinguished themselves by railing to them. Their want of learning, which has

at the sex in general, very often make an planted them in this station, may in some

honourable amends, by choosing one of the measure extenuate their misdemeanour; and

most worthless persons of it for a companion our professors ought to pardon them when

and yoke-fellow. Hymen takes his revenge they offend in this particular, considering in

in kind on those who turn his mysteries into that they are in a state of ignorance, or, as ridicule. . we usually say, do not know their right hand

My friend. Will Honeycomb, who was so from their leit.

unmercifully witty upon the women, in a There is another tribe of persons who are

couple of letters which I lately communicated retainers to the learned world, and who re

to the public, has given the ladies ample sagulate themselves upon all occasions by seve-Itisfaction by marrying a farmer's daughter ; ral laws peculiar to their body ; I mean the la piece of news which came to our club by players or actors of both sexes. Among these the last post. The templar is very positive it is a standing and uncontroverted principle, I that he has married a dairy-inaid: but Will, that a tragedian always takes place of a co-lin his letter to me on this occasion, sets the median ; and it is very well known the merry | best face upon the matter that he can, and drolls who make us laugh are always placed gives a more tolerable account of his spouse. at the luwer end of the table, and in every

Very I must confess I suspected something more

mus entertainment give way to the dignity of the than ordinary, when upon opening the letter buskin. It is a stage maxim, Once a king, I found that will was fallen off from his and always a king.' For this reason it would

Ha former gaiety, having changed · Dear Spec," be thought very absurd in Mr. Bullock, not-1:

which was his usual salute at the beginning of withstanding the height and gracefulness of the

is of the letter, into My worthy Friend,' and subhis person, to sit at the right hand of an hero,

o, scribed himself in the latter end, at full length, though he were but five foot high. The

he William Honeycomb. In short, the gay, the same distinction is observed among the ladies liane

ong the ladies loud, the vain Will Honeycomb, who had made of the theatre. Queens and heroines preserve

love to every great fortune that has appeared their rank in private conversation, while those

in town for above thirty years together, and who are waiting-women and maids of honour

boasted of favours from ladies whom he had upon the stage keep their distance also be

never seen, is at length wedded to a plain hind the scenes. I shall only add that, by a parity of reason,

country girl,

His letter gives us the picture of a converted all writers of tragedy look upon it as their duerake The coher character of the husband is to be seated, served, or saluted, before comic dashed with the man of the town, and enliwriters ; those who deal in tragi-comedy usu-vened with those little cant phrases which ally taking their seats between the authors of havem either side. There has been a long dispute for pre

have made my friend Will often thought very precedency between the tragic and heroic for himself.

or pretty company. But let us hear what he says poets. Aristotle would have the latter yield the pas to the former ; but Mr. Dryden, and 'MY WORTHY FRIEND, inany others, would never submit to this deci- 'I question not but you, and the rest of sion. Burlesque writers pay the same deser- my acquaintance, wonder that I, who have

lived in the smoke and gallantries of the town Unde nil majus generatur ipso ; for thirty years together, should all on a

Nec viget quicquam simile aut secundum.

Hor. Od. xii. Lib. 1. [. sudden grow fond of a country life. Had not my dog of a steward ran away as he did, Who guides below, and rules above, without making up his accounts, I had still The great disposer, and the mighty King; been immersed in sin and sea.coal. But

Than he pone greater, like him none,

That can be, is, or was; since my late forced visit to my estate, I am

Supreme he singly fills the throne. Creech. so pleased with it, that I am resolved to live and die upon it. I am every day abroad SIMONIDES being asked by Dionysius the among my acres, and can scarce forbear fill- tyrant what God was, desired a day's time to ing my letters with breezes, shades, flowers, consider of it before he made his reply. When meadows, and purling streams. The simpli- the day was expired he desired two days; and city of manners, which I have heard you so afterwards, instead of returning his answer, often speak of, and which appears here in demanded still double the time to consider of perfection, charms me wonderfully. As an it. This great poet and philosopher, the more instance of it I must acquaint you, and by he contemplated the nature of the Deity, found your means the whole club, that I have lately that he waded but the more out of his depth ; married one of my tenant's daughters. She and that he lost himself in the thought, instead is born of honest parents; and though she has of finding an end of it. no portion, she has a great deal of virtue. The If we consider the idea which wise men, by natural sweetness and innocence of her be the light of reason, have framed of the Divine haviour, the freshness of her complexion, the Being, it amounts to this ; that he has in him unaffected turn of her shape and person, shot all the perfection of a spiritual nature. And, me through and through every time I saw her, since we have no notion of any kind of spiriand did more execution upon me in grogram tual perfection but what we discover in our than the greatest beauty in town or court had own souls, we join infinitude to each kind of ever done in brocade. In short, she is such these perfections, and what is a faculty in an one as promises me a good heir to my an human soul becomes an attribute in God. estate ; and if by her means I cannot leave to We exist in place and time ; the Divine Bemy children what are falsely called the gifts or ing fills the immensity of space with his prebirth, high titles, and alliances, I hope to con- sence, and inhabits eternity. We are posvey to them the more real and valuable gifts sessed of a little power and a little knowof birth-strong bodies, and healthy constitu- ledge: The Divine Being is almighty and omtions. As for your fine women I need not tell niscient. In short, by adding infinity to any thee that I know them. I have had my share kind of perfection we enjoy, and by joining all in their graces; but no more of that. It shall these different kinds of perfection in one bebe my business hereafter to live the life of an ing, we form our idea of the great Sovereign honest man, and to act as becomes the master of Nature. of a family. I question not but I shall draw Though every one who thinks must have apon me the raillery of the town, and be treat- made this observation, I shall produce Mr. ed to the tune of, The Marriage-hater Match- Locke's authority to the same purpose, out of ed;'* but I am prepared for it. I have been his Essay on Human Understanding. If we as witty upon others in my time. To tell thee examine the idea we have of the incompretruly, I saw such a tribe of fashionable young hepsible Supreme Being, we shall find that we fluttering coxcombs shot up, that I did not come by it the same way ; and that the comthink my post of an homme de ruelle any plex ideas we have both of God and separate longer tenable. I felt a certain stiffness in my spirits, are made up of the simple ideas we limbs, which entirely destroyed the jantiness receive from reflection : v. g. having, from of air I was once master of. Besides, for I may what we experience in ourselves, got the ideas now confess my age to thee, I have been eight- of existence and duration, of knowledge and and-forty above these twelve years. Since my powe: of pleasure and happiness, and of seretirement into the country will make a va- veral other qualities and powers, which it is cancy in the club, I could wish you would fill better to have than to be without : when we up my place with my friend Tom Dapperwit. would frame an idea the most suitable we can He has an infinite deal of fire, and knows the to the Supreme Being, we enlarge every one of town. For my own part, as I have said before, these with our own idea of infinity: and so I shall endeavour to live hereafter suitable to putting them together, make our complex idea a man in my station, as a prudent head of a of God.' family, a good husband, a careful father (when It is not impossible that there may be many it shall so happen,) and as

kinds of spiritual perfection, besides these • Your most sincere friend, which are lodged in an human soul : but it WILLIAM HONEYCOMB. is impossible that we should have the ideas

of any kinds of persection, except those of No. 531.] Saturday, November 8. 1712.

which we have some small rays and short im

perfect strokes in ourselves. It would thereQui mare et terras, variisque mundum Temperat horis :

fore be very high presumption to determine

whether the Supreme Being has not many The name of one of 'Tom Durfey's miserable comedies. more attributes than those which enter WIt was Dogget's excellent performance of a character in

play, that first drow the eyes of the public upon him to our conceptions of hiin. This is certain, and marked him out as an actor of superior talents. that if there be any kind of spiritual perfec.

tion which is not marked out in an human/the supreme model of all pertection. It would soul, it belongs in its fulness to the divine Da- likewise quicken our desires and endeavours of ture.

uniting ourselves to him by all the acts of reliSeveral eminent philosophers have imagined gion and virtue. that the soul, in her separate state, may have such an habitual homage to the Supreme new faculties springing up in her, which she Being would, in a particular manner, banish is not capable of exerting during her present from among us that prevailing impiety of union with the body; and whether these facul- using his name on the most trivial occaties may not correspond with other attributes sions. in the divine nature, and open to us hereafter I find the following passage in an excellent new matter of wonder and adoration, we are sermon, preached at the funeral of a gentlealtogether ignorant. This, as I have said be- man* who was an honour to his country, and fore, we ought to acquiesce in, that the So- a more diliger.t as well as successful inquirer vereign Being, the great author of nature has, into the works of nature than any otber our in him all possible perfection, as well in kind nation has ever produced. “He had the proas in degree: to speak according to our me- foundest veneration for the great God of bea. thods of conceiving, I shall only add under ven and earth that lever observed in any per. this head, that when we have raised our no- son. The very name of God was never meption of this Infinite Beiog as high as it is pos. tioned by him without a pause and a visible sible for the mind of man to go, it will fall stop in his discourse ; in which one, tbat knew infinitely short of what he really is. “There him most particularly above twenty years, is no end of his greatness.' The most exalted has told me that he was so exact, that he does creature he has made is only capable of ador- not remember to have observed him once to ing it, none but himself can comprehend it. Trail in it.'

The advice of the son of Sirach is very just! Every one knows the veneration which was and sublime in this light. “By his word all paid by the Jews to a name so great, wonderthings consist. We may speak much, and yet ful, and holy. They would not let it enter come short: wherefore in sum he is all. How even into their religious discourses. What shall we be able to magnity him ? for he is can we 'think of those who make use of so great above all his works. The Lord is ter- tremendous a name in the ordinary expresrible and very great ; and marvellous in his sions of their anger, mirth, and most imperpower. When you glorify the Lord, exalt him tinent passions ? of those who admit it into as much as you can; for even 'yet will he far most familiar questions and assertions, ludiexceed. And when you exalt him, put forth crous phrases, and works of humour ? not to all your strength, and be not weary ; for you mention those who violate it by solemn perju. can never go far enough. Who hath seen him, ries! It would be an affront to reason to enthat he might tell us ? and who can magnify deavour to set forth the horror and profanehim as he is? There are yet hid greater things ness of such a practice. The very mention than these be, for we have seen but a few of of it exposes it sufficiently to those in whom his works.'

the light of nature, not to say religion, is not I have here only considered the Supreme utterly extinguished. Being by the light of reason and philosophy. If we would see him in all the wonders of his mercy, we must have recourse to revela- No. 532.7 Monday, Norember 10, 1712. tion, which represents him to us not only as infinitely great and glorious, but as infinitely

- Fungor vice cotis, acutum

Rendere quæ ferrum valet, exsors ipka secandi. good and just in his dispensations towards

Hor. Ars Poet, ver. 304, man. But as this is a theory which falls under

I play the whetstone: useless and unfit every one's consideration, though indeed it

To cut myself, I sharpen others wil. can never be sufficiently considered, I shall

Creeck here only take notice of that habitual worship! It is a very honest action to be studious to and veneration which we ought to pay to this produce other men's merit ; and I make no Almighty Being. We should often refresh our scruple of saying, I have as much of this temminds with the thought of him, and annihilate per as any inau in the world It would not ourselves before him, in the contemplation of be a thing to be bragged of, but that it is what our own worthlessness, and of his transcend- any man may be master of, who will take ent excellency and perfection. This would pains enougb for it. Much observation of the imprint in our minds such a constant and unworthiness in being pained at the excellence uninterrupted awe and veneration as that of another, will bring you to a scorn of vour. which I am here recommending, and which self for that unwillingness; and when you is in reality a kind of incessant prayer, and

have got so far, you will find it a greater pleareasonable humiliation of the soul before him sure than you ever before knew to be zealous wbo inade it.

in promoting the fame and welfare of the This would effectually kill in as all the little praise-worthy. I do not speak this as preseeds of pride, vanity, and self-conceit, which tending to be a mortified self-denying man. are apt to shoot up in the minds of such but as one who had turned his ambition into whose thoughts turn more on those compara- a right channel. I claim to myself the merit tive advantages which they enjoy over some of their fellow-creatures, than on that infinite See bishop Burnet's Sermon, preached at the funeral distance which is placed between theun and of the poprotrablo Robert Boyle.

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of having extorted excellent productions from levity, but rather of endearment and concern ; a person of the greatest abilities, who would such as we find in Catullus, and the authors not have let them appeared by any other of Hendecasyllabi after him, where they are means;* to have animated a few young gen- used to express the utmost love and tenderness tleinen into worthy pursuits, who will be a for their mistresses. If you think me right in glory to our age; and at all times, and by my notion of the last words of Adrian, be all possible means in my power, undermined pleased to insert this in the Spectator ; if not, the interest of ignorance, vice, and folly, and to suppress it.

. I am, &c. attempted to substitute in their stead, learning. piety, and good sense. It is from this honest To the supposed Author of the Spectator. heart that I find myself honoured as a gentleman-usher to the arts and sciences. In courts licentious, and a shameless stage, Mr. Tickell and Mr. Pope have, it seems, How long the war shall wit with virtue wage ?

Enchanted by this prostituted fair, this idea of me. The former has writ me

Our youth run headlong in the fatal snare; an excellent paper of verses, in praise, for In height ofrapture clasp unheeded pains, sooth, of myself; and the other enclosed for And suck pollution through their tingling veins. mv perusal an admirable poem,t which I hope will shortly see the light. In the mean time

• Thy spotless thoughts vinshock'd the priest may hear,

And the pure vertal in her bosom wear. I cannot suppress any thought of his, but in.

To conscious blushes and diminish'd pride, sert this sentiment about the dying words of Thy glass, betrays what treach'rous love would hide ; Adrian. I will not determine in the case he Nor harsh thy precepts, but, infus d by stealth,

Please while tbey cure, and cheat us into health. mentions; but have thus much to say in favour of his argument, that many of his own works

Tby works in Chloe's toilet gain a part, which I have seen, convince me that very And with his tailor share the fopling's heart: pretty and very sublime sentiments may be Lash'd in thy satire the penurious cit

Laughs at himself, and finds po barm in wit : lodged in the same bosom without diminution

From felon gamesters the ra'v 'squire is free, of its greatness.

And Britain owes her rescu'd oaks to thee.

His miss the frolic viscountt dreads to toast, * MR. SPECTATOR,

Or his third cure the shallow templar boast;

And the rash fool, who scorn'd the beaten road, • I was the other day in company with five

Dares quake at thunder, and confess his God. or six men of some learning: where, chancing to mention the famous verses which the em. The brainless stripling, who expell’d to town,

Damn'd the stiff college and pedantic gown, peror Adrian spoke on his death-bed, they were

Aw'd by thy name is dumb, and thrice a week all agreed that it was a piece of gaiety un Spells uncouth Latin, and pretend to Greck. worthy that prince in those circumstances. Il A saunt'ring tribe ! such, born to wide estates, could not but dissent from this opinion. Me-i With “yea" and "no" in senates hold debates :

At length despis'd, each to his field retires, thinks it was by no means a gay but a very i

First wi:h the dogs, and king amidst the 'equires ; serious soliloquy to his soul at the point of his From pert to stupid sinks supinely down, departure : in which sense I naturally took In youth a coxcomb, and in age a clown. these verses at my first reading them, when

Such readers scorn'd, thou wing'st thy daring flight I was very young, and before I knew what in

Above the stars, and tread'st the fields of light; terpretation the world generally put upon Fame, heaven, and hell, are thy exalted theme, them.

And visions such as Jove himself might dreain; .

Man sunk to slav'ry, though to glory born,
“Animula vagula, blandula,

Heaven s pride when upright, and deprav'd his scorah
Hospes comesque corporis,
Quæ nunc abibis in loca?

Such hints alone could British Virgil Jend, i
Pallidula, rigida, nudula,

And thou alone deserve from such a friend :
Nec (ut soles) dabis jocos!"

A debt so borrow'd is illustrious fame,

And fame when shar'd with him is double fame. " Alas, my soul! thou pleasing companion

So flush'd with sweets, by beauty's queen bestow'}, of this body, thou fleeting thing that art now

With more than mortal charms Eneas glow'd :

Such gen'rous strifes Eugene and Marlbro' try, deserting it, whither art thou flying? to what

And as in glory so in friendship vie. unknown regions ? Thou art all trembling, fearful, and pensive. Now what is become of Permit these lines by thee to live-nor blame thy former wit and humour ? Thou shalt jest

A muse that pants and languishes for fame;

That fears to sink when humbled themes she sings, and be gay no more."

Lost in the mass of mean forgotten things. I confess I cannot apprehend where lies Receiv'd by thee, I propliesy my rhimes the trifling in all this; it is the most natural

The praise of virgins in succeeding times :

Mix'd with thy works, their life no bounds shall see, and obvious reflection imaginable to a dying

But stand protected as inspir'd by thee. man : and, if we consider the emperor was a heathen, tbat doubt concerning the future So come weak shoot, which else would poorly rise, state of his soul will seem so far from being

Jove's tree adopts and lifts him to the skies; the effect of want of thought, that it was

Through the new pupil fost'ring juices flow,

Thrust forth the gems, and give the flowers to blow; scarce reasonable he should think otherwise : Aloft, immortal reigns the plant unknown, not to mention that here is a plain confession. With borrow'd life, ond vigour not his own.' included of his belief in its immortality. The diminutive epithets of vagula, blandula, and Mr. Tickell bere alludes to Steel's papers against the the rest, appear not to me as expressions of sharpers, &c. in the Tutler, and particularly to a letter in

Tat. No. 73, signed Will Trusty, and written by Mr. John

Hughes. * Addison + The Temple of Fame. | Viscount Rolingbroke. A compliment to Addisons

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