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as a poet, would be superfluous. After passing through the many trials which criticism has instituted, he remains, by universal acknowledgment, one of the first poets of the eighteenth century. Even without awaiting the issue of such trials, he attained a degree of popularity which is almost without a precedent, while the species of popularity which he has acquired is yet more honorable than the extent of it. No man's works ever appeared with less of artificial preparation; no venal heralds proclaimed the approach of a new poet, nor told the world what it was to admire. He emerged from obscurity, the object of no patronage, and the adherent of no party. His fame, great and extensive as it is, arose from gradual conviction, and gratitude for pleasure received. The genius, the scholar, the critic, the devout man, and the man of the world, each found in the works of Cowper something to excite their admiration, something congenial with their habits and feelings, demething which taste readily, selected, and judgment deci.

confirmed.

CONTENTS.

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PAGE
The Shrubbery

151
The Winter Nosegay

Ibid
Mutual Forbearance necessa-

ry to the Happiness of the
Married State.

152
The Negro's Complaint 154
Pity for poor Africans

155
The Morning Dream

156
The Nightingale and Glow-

157
On a Goldfinch starved to
Death in his Cage

158

The Pineapple and the Bee. 159

Horace, Book II. Ode X. 160

A reflection on the foregoing

Ode

161

The Lily and the Rose

Ibid

Idem Latine Redditum 162

The Poplar Field

163

Idem Latine Redditum

164

Votum

Ibid

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Ninth Satire of the First Book
of Horace.

378

TRANSLATIONS OF
THE LATIN AND ITALIAN

POEMS OF MILTON.

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PAGE

Epistle to Joseph Hill, Esq. 293

Tirocinium; or a review of

Schools

295

To the Reverend Mr. Newton 315

Catharina.

316

The Moralizer Corrected 317

The Faithful Bird.

319

The Needless Aların.

320

Boadicea

323

Heroism

324

On the Receipt of my Mother's

Picture out of Norfolk 326

Friendship

330

On a Mischievous Bull, which

the Owner of him sold at the

Author's Instance. .

335

Annus. Memorabilis,

Memorabilis, i789.

Written in Commemoration

of his Majesty's happy Reco-

very.

336

Hymn for the Use of the Sunday

School at Olney.

338

Stanzas subjoined to a Bill of

Mortality for the year 1787 339

On a similar occasion for 1788 341

On a similar occasion for 1789 342

On a similar occasion for 1790 344

On a similar occasion for 1792 345

On a similar occasion for 1793 347

Inscription for the Tomb of

Mr. Hamilton.

348

The Enchantment Dissolved 249

Light Shining out of Dark-

350

Temptation.

To Warren Hastings, Esq. 352

To Mary, 1793.

On the ice Islands seen float-

ing in the German Ocean. 354

The Cast-away.

On the loss of the Royal

George.

3586

Sonnet to Mrs. Unwin.

3594

The Retired Cat.

361

On thè Shortness of Human

Life.

364

Sonnet to Diodati, from the

Italian.

365

Sonnet to a Lady, froin the

a '

Italian.

Ibid

To the Nightingale

366

- To Williain Wilberforce. 507

To William Hayley Esq.

Ibid

Verses sent to Lady Austen. 368

Song'on Peace.

Ibid

Song written at the request of

Lady Austen.

369

To George Romney, Esq. 370

To my Cousin Ann Bodham, Ibid

Epitaph on Johnson.

Ibia

The Bird's Nest, A Tale. 371

Fifth Satire of the First Book

of Horace.

373

of Ely.

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MINOR POEMS.

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COWPER'S POEMS.

TABLE TALK.

Si te fortè meæ gravis uret sarcina chartæ,
Abjicito.

Hor. Lib. i. Epist. 13.

A. You told me, I remember, glory, built On selfish principles, is shame and guilt; The deeds, that men admire as half-divine, Stark naught, because corrupt in their design. Strange doctrine this! that without scruple tears The laurel, that the very lightning spares; Brings down the warrior's trophy to the dust, And eats into his bloody sword like rust.

B. I grant that, men continuing what they are, Fierce; avaricious, proud, there must be war: And never meant the rule should be applied To him, that fights with justice on his side.

Let laurels, drench'd in pure Parnassian dews,
Reward his mem'ry, dear to ev'ry muse,
Who, with a courage of unshaken root,
In honour's field advancing his firm foot,
Plants it upon the line that Justice draws,
And will prevail or perish in her cause.
'Tis to the virtues of such men, man owes
His portion in the good that Heav'n bestows,
And when recording History displays
Feats of renown, though wrought in ancient days ;
Tells of a few stout hearts, that fought and died,
Where duty plac'd them, at their country's side ;
The man, that is not mov'd with what he reads,
That takes not fire at their heroic deeds,
Unworthy of the blessings of the brave,
Is base in kind, and born to be a slave.

But let eternal infamy pursue
The wretch, to nought but his ambition true
Who, for the sake of filling with one blast
The post-horns of all Europe, lays her waste.
Think yourself station'd on a tow'ring rock,

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