The Works of Beaumont and Fletcher, Volumen1

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Página x - What things have we seen Done at the Mermaid ! Heard words that have been So nimble, and so full of subtle flame, As if that every one from whence they came Had meant to put his whole wit in a jest And had resolved to live a fool the rest Of his dull life ; then when there hath been thrown Wit able enough to justify the town For three days past ; wit that might warrant be For the whole City to talk foolishly Till that were cancell'd ; and when that was gone, We left an air behind us, which alone...
Página xxvii - Gratiano speaks an infinite deal of nothing, more than any man in all Venice. His reasons are as two grains of wheat hid in two bushels of chaff : you shall seek all day ere you find them, and when you have them, they are not worth the search.
Página 7 - Since I can do no good, because a woman, Reach constantly at something that is near it : I will redeem one minute of my age, Or, like another Niobe, I'll weep Till I am water.
Página 254 - pastoral tragicomedy," reminding the reader in the preface to the printed edition that " a tragicomedy is not so called in respect of mirth and killing, but in respect it wants deaths, which is enough to make it no tragedy, yet brings some near it, which is enough to make it no comedy...
Página 259 - Hovering o'er the wanton face Of these pastures, where they come Striking dead both bud and bloom : Therefore from such danger lock Every one his loved flock ; And let your dogs lie loose without, Lest the wolf come as a scout From the mountain, and, ere day, Bear a lamb or kid away ; Or the crafty thievish fox Break upon your simple flocks. To secure...
Página 24 - Alas, what kind of grief can thy years know? Hadst thou a curst master when thou went'st to school? Thou art not capable of other grief ; Thy brows and cheeks are smooth as waters be When no breath troubles them. Believe me, boy, Care seeks out wrinkled brows and hollow eyes, And builds himself caves, to abide in them.
Página 21 - ... the fields, Which gave him roots, and of the crystal springs, Which did not stop their courses, and the sun, Which still, he thanked him, yielded him his light.
Página vii - To the very moment that he bade me tell it; Wherein I spake of most disastrous chances, Of moving accidents by flood and field, Of hair-breadth 'scapes i...
Página xxv - Their plots were generally more regular than Shakespeare's, especially those which were made before Beaumont's death ; and they understood and imitated the conversation of gentlemen much better ; whose wild debaucheries, and quickness of wit in repartees, no poet can ever paint as they have done.
Página xxxiv - Of which he borrowed some to quench his thirst, And paid the nymph again as much in tears : A garland lay him by...

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