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All you

that love or loved before, The fairy-queen Proserpina Bids

you increase that loving humour more :
They that have not fed

On delight amorous
She vows that they shall lead
Apes in Avernus.

T. Campion.

XLVII

LOVE'S HARVESTERS

All ye that lovely lovers be

Pray you for me :
Lo here we come a-sowing, a-sowing,
And sow sweet fruits of love ;
In your sweet hearts well may it prove!

Lo here we come a-reaping, a-reaping,
To reap our harvest fruit !
And thus we pass the year so long,
And never be we mute.

Geo. Peele.

XLVIII

THE PASSIONATE SHEPHERD TO

HIS LOVE

COME live with me and be

my Love,
And we will all the pleasures prove
That hills and valleys, dales and fields,
Or woods or steepy mountain yields.
And we will sit upon the rocks,
And see the shepherds feed their flocks
By shallow rivers to whose falls
Melodious birds sing madrigals.
And I will make thee beds of roses
And a thousand fragrant posies;
A cap of flowers, and a kirtle
Embroider'd all with leaves of myrtle.
A
gown

made of the finest wool
Which from our pretty lambs we pull;
Fair-linèd slippers for the cold,
With buckles of the purest gold.
A belt of straw and ivy-buds
With coral clasps and amber studs :
And if these pleasures may thee move,
Come live with me and be

my

Love. The shepherd swains shall dance and sing For thy delight each May morning : If these delights thy mind may move, Then live with me and be my Love.

C. Marlowe.

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If all the world and love were young,
And truth in every shepherd's tongue,
These pretty pleasures might me move
To live with thee and be thy Love.
But Time drives flocks from field to fold ;
Where rivers rage and rocks grow cold ;
And Philomel becometh dumb,
The rest complains of cares to come.
The flowers do fade, the wanton fields
To wayward winter reckoning yields :
A honey tongue, a heart of gall,
Is fancy's spring but sorrow's fall.
Thy gowns, thy shoes, thy beds of roses,
Thy cap, thy kirtle, and thy posies,

Soon break, soon wither—soon forgotten, | In folly ripe, in reason rotten.

Thy belt of straw and ivy-buds,
Thy coral clasps and amber studs,-
All these in me no means can move
To come to thee and be thy Love.
But could youth last, and love still breed,
Had joys no date, nor age no need,
Then those delights my mind might move
To live with thee and be thy Love.

Sir W. Raleigh.

L

UNDER THE GREENWOOD TREE

AMIENs sings :

Under the greenwood tree,
Who loves to lie with me,
And turn his merry note

Unto the sweet bird's throat,
Come hither, come hither, come hither:

Here shall he see

No enemy
But winter and rough weather.

Who doth ambition shun,
And loves to live i' the sun,
Seeking the food he eats,

And pleased with what he gets,
Come hither, come hither, come hither;

Here shall he see
No

enemy
But winter and rough weather.

JAQUES replies :

If it do come to pass
That any man turn ass,
Leaving his wealth and ease

A stubborn will to please,
Ducdame, ducdame, ducdame :

Here shall he see

Gross fools as he,
An if he will come to me.

Shakespeare. AMIENS' SONG

43

LI

AMIENS' SONG

Blow, blow, thou winter wind,
Thou art not so unkind

As man's ingratitude;
Thy tooth is not so keen,
Because thou art not seen,

Although thy breath be rude.
Heigh ho ! sing, heigh ho! unto the green holly:
Most friendship is feigning, most loving mere folly:

Then heigh ho, the holly:
This life is most jolly.

Freeze, freeze, thou bitter sky,
That dost not bite so nigh

As benefits forgot:
Though thou the waters warp,
Thy sting is not so sharp

As friend remember'd not.
Heigh ho! sing, heigh ho! unto the green holly :
Most friendship is feigning, most loving mere folly:

Then heigh ho, the holly!
This life is most jolly.

Shakespeare,

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