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CHERRY-RIPE

129

CXXXI

CHERRY-RIPE

1

CHERRY-RIPE, ripe, ripe, I cry,
Full and fair ones; come and buy.
If so be

you

ask me where
They do grow, I answer: There
Where my Julia's lips do smile ;
There's the land, or cherry-isle,
Whose plantations fully show
All the year where cherries grow.

Herrick.

CXXXII

2

THERE is a garden in her face

Where roses and white lilies blow; A heavenly paradise is that place Wherein all pleasant fruits do flow : There cherries

grow

that none may buy Till • Cherry-ripe' themselves do cry.

Those cherries fairly do enclose

Of orient pearl a double row,
Which when her lovely laughter shows,
They look like rose-buds fill’d with snow;

Yet them nor peer nor prince may buy
Till Cherry-ripe' themselves do cry.

Her eyes like angels watch them still;

Her brows like bended bows do stand,
Threat'ning with piercing frowns to kill
All that attempt with eye or hand

Those sacred cherries to come nigh,
Till 'Cherry-ripe' themselves do cry.

T. Campion.

CXXXIII

DRESS AND UNDRESS

My Love in her attire doth show her wit,

It doth so well become her;
For every season she hath dressings fit,
For Winter, Spring, and Summer.

No beauty she doth miss

When all her robes are on:
But Beauty's self she is
When all her robes are gone.

Anon.

CXXXIV

SIMPLEX MUNDITIIS

Still to be neat, still to be drest,
As you were going to a feast;
Still to be powder'd, still perfumed :
Lady, it is to be presumed,
Though art's hid causes are not found,
All is not sweet, all is not sound.

ART ABOVE NATURE: TO JULIA

131

Give me a look, give me a face
That makes simplicity a grace ;
Robes loosely flowing, hair as free:
Such sweet neglect more taketh me
Than all th' adulteries of art;
They strike mine eyes, but not my heart.

B. Jonson.

CXXXV

ART ABOVE NATURE: TO JULIA

When I behold a forest spread
With silken trees upon thy head,
And when I see that other dress
Of flowers set in comeliness;
When I behold another grace
In the ascent of curious lace,
Which like a pinnacle doth show
The top, and the top-gallant too;
Then, when I see thy tresses bound
Into an oval, square, or round,
And knit in knots far more than I
Can tell by tongue, or true-love tie;
Next, when those lawny films I see
Play with a wild civility,
And all those airy silks to flow,
Alluring me, and tempting so:
I must confess mine eye and heart
Dotes less of Nature than on Art.

Herrick.

CXXXVI

DELIGHT IN DISORDER

A SWEET disorder in the dress
Kindles in clothes a wantonness :
A lawn about the shoulders thrown
Into a fine distraction :
An erring lace, which here and there
Enthrals the crimson stomacher:
A cuff neglectful, and thereby
Ribbons to flow confusedly:
A winning wave, deserving note,
In the tempestuous petticoat:
A careless shoe-string, in whose tie
I see a wild civility :
Do more bewitch me than when art
Is too precise in every part.

Herrick.

CXXXVII

UPON JULIA'S CLOTHES

WHENAS in silks

my
Julia

goes, Then, then, methinks, how sweetly flows The liquefaction of her clothes !

and see

Next, when I cast mine eyes
That brave vibration each
-O how that glittering taketh me!

Herrick.

way free,

THE COMPLETE LOVER

133

CXXXVIII

THE COMPLETE LOVER

1. He
For her gait, if she be walking ;
Be she sitting, I desire her
For her state's sake; and admire her
For her wit if she be talking;

Gait and state and wit approve her;

For which all and each I love her.
Be she sullen, I commend her
For a modest. Be she merry,
For a kind one her prefer I.
Briefly, everything doth lend her

So much grace, and so approve her,
That for everything I love her.

Wm. Browne.

CXXXIX

2. She
Love not me for comely grace,
For my pleasing eye or face,
Nor for any outward part,
No, nor for a constant heart:

For these may fail or turn to ill,

So thou and I shall sever:
Keep, therefore, a true woman's eye,
And love me still but know not why-

So hast thou the same reason still
To doat upon me ever!

Anon.

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