The Works of Joseph Addison: Including the Whole Contents of Bp. Hurd's Edition, with Letters and Other Pieces Not Found in Any Previous Collection; and Macaulay's Essay on His Life and Works, Volumen4

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G.P. Putnam & Company, 1854
 

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PAGE
35
Account of various Clubs
36
The Uses of the Spectator
41
THE SPECTATOR Continued
42
Custom of telling Stories of Ghosts to Children
45
Conduct of the Lions at the OperaMerit of Nicolini
49
Story of Cleantheon Happiness exemplified in Aurelia Fulvia
53
Various Articles of DressLampoonsScandalPoli ticsLetter from Charles Lillie
57
History of the Italian Opera
61
tioners
65
The SPECTATOR Continued 69 Visit to the Royal ExchangeBenefit of Extensive
69
Illnatured Satire
71
Letter from a ValetudinarianExcess of Anxiety about Health
75
Reflections in WestminsterAbbey
79
Project of an Office for the Regulation of Signsa Mon key recommended for the Opera
83
Italian RecitativeAbsurdities of the Opera Dresses
87
Project of a new Opera
92
Success of the Spectators with various Classes of Read ers represented by the Club
96
False Wit and HumourGenealogy of Humour
100
Catalogue of a Ladys LibraryCharacter of Leonora
104
English TragedyLeeOtway
109
Tragedy and TragiComedy
114
English TragedyMethods to aggrandize the Persons in Tragedy
119
The Subject continuedWisdom of Providence
121
A Visit with Sir Roger to the Country Assizes
122
Stage Tricks to excite PityDramatic Murders
123
Use and Difficulties of Periodical Papers
124
Mischiefs of Party Spirit
125
The Subject continuedSir Rogers Principles
126
Ill Consequences of the Peace French FashionsChild ish Impertinence
129
Letter on the Hooppetticoat 3
130
Opinions entertained of the Spectator in the Country Letter from Will Honeycomb 36
131
Blessing of Being born an EnglishmanThe English
135
The Spectators Paper of Hints droppedGospelgossip Ogling
136
Theory of the Passion of Laughter
137
Tongue 37
138
Remarks on the English by the Indian Kings
142
Effects of Avarice and Luxury on Employments
149
Vision of Marraton
153
Mischiefs of PartyRage in the Female Sex
158
Essay on WitHistory of False Wit
162
The same subject continued
167
Wit of the Monkish Agesin Modern Times
172
The Subject continued
177
Difference between True and False WitMixt Wit
181
Allegory of several Schemes of Wit
188
On Friendship
194
Commerce
198
Critique on the Ballad of ChevyChase
203
Account of the Everlasting Club
211
Passion for Fame and PraiseCharacter of the Idols
214
Continuation of the Critique on ChevyChase
218
Female PartySpirit discovered by Patches
223
Dream of a Picture Gallery
230
The Chief Point of Honour in Men and WomenDuel ling
271
Uncertainty of FameSpecimen of a History of the Reign of Anne I
275
Exercise of the Fan
279
Will Honeycombs Knowledge of the Worldvarious Kinds of Pedants
283
Spectators visit to Sir R de Coverleys Country Seat the Knights domestic Establishment
287
Character of Will Wimble
291
On Ghosts and Apparitions
295
Immateriality of the Soul
300
A Sunday in the CountrySir Rogers Behaviour at Church
304
JOSEPH ADDISON
306
Labour and Exercise
312
No whiter page than Addison remains
313
Rural MannersPoliteness
316
Instinct in Animals
324
The Vision of Mirza 37
384
On Inconstancy and Irresolution 38
392
Durability of WritingAnecdote of an atheistical Au thor
407
On Goodnature as the Effect of Constitution
411
On Jealousy
420
Account of a Grinningmatch
427
Goodnature as a Moral Virtue
431
Various Dispositions of ReadersAccount of a Whist lingmatchYawning
436
Cruelty of Parents in the Affair of Marriage
441
On FableFable of Pleasure and Pain
446
THE SPECTATOR Continued 184 Account of a remarkable Sleeper
451
Zealvarious kinds of Zealots
454
On Infidelity
458
Cruelty of ParentsLetter from a Father to his Son Duty to Parents
463
On the Whims of LotteryAdventurers
466
On Temperance
471
Character of the SalamandersStory of a Castilian and his Wife
478
DevotionEnthusiasm
480
On Seducers and their illicit ProgenyLetter from a natural Son
482
Description of a Female Panderaffected Method of PsalmsingingErratum in the Paper on Drink ing
489
Notions of the Heathen on Devotion
494
Simonidess Satire on Women
499
Transmigration of SoulsLetters on Simonidess Satire on Women
504
On habitual good Intentions
509
Educationcompared to Sculpture
513
QualityVanity of Honours and Titles
517
Use of MottoesLove of Latin among the Common peo pleSignature Letters
521
Account of Sappho
528
Discretion and Cunning
531
Letter on the Lovers Leap
534
Fragment of Sappho
539
Reflections on Modesty
543
History of the Lovers Leap
548
Account of the Trunkmaker in the Theatre
552
On the Ways of Providence
556
Various Ways of managing a Debate
560
Letter on the Absence of LoversRemedies proposed
564
On the Beauty and Loveliness of Virtue
568
Different Classes of Female Orators
576
Letter on the Cries of London
584

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Página 584 - Sport that wrinkled Care derides, And Laughter holding both his sides. Come, and trip it as you go, On the light fantastic toe ; And in thy right hand lead with thee The mountain nymph, sweet Liberty; And if I give thee honour due, Mirth, admit me of thy crew, To live with her and live with thee, In unreproved pleasures free...
Página 378 - the tops of the mountains, I fell into a profound contemplation on the vanity of human life; and passing from one thought to another, Surely, said I, man is but a shadow, and life a dream.
Página 83 - When I read the several dates of the tombs, of" some that died yesterday, and some six hundred years ago, I consider that great day when we shall all of us be contemporaries, and make our appearance together.
Página 380 - As I looked more attentively, I saw several of the passengers dropping through the bridge into the great tide that flowed underneath it; and upon. further examination, perceived there were innumerable trapdoors that lay concealed in the bridge, which the passengers no sooner trod upon, but they fell through them into the tide, and immediately disappeared. These hidden pit-falls were set very thick at the entrance of the bridge, so that throngs of people no sooner broke through the cloud, but many...
Página 379 - The genius smiled upon me with a look of compassion and affability that familiarized him to my imagination, and at once dispelled all the fears and apprehensions with which I approached him. He lifted me from the ground, and taking me by the hand, Mirza, said he, I have heard thee in thy soliloquies ; follow me.
Página 80 - ... human body. Upon this I began to consider with myself, what innumerable multitudes of people lay confused together under the pavement of that ancient cathedral ; how men and women, friends...
Página 381 - I observed some with scimitars in their hands, and others with urinals, who ran to and fro upon the bridge, thrusting several persons on trap-doors which did not seem to lie in their way, and which they might have escaped, had they not been thus forced upon them. "The genius, seeing me indulge myself in this melancholy prospect, told me I had dwelt long enough upon it. ' Take thine eyes off the bridge,' said he, ' and tell me if thou yet seest anything thou dost not comprehend.' Upon looking up,...
Página 220 - The stout Earl of Northumberland, A vow to God did make, His pleasure in the Scottish woods Three summer's days to take; The chiefest harts in Chevy-Chase To kill and bear away.
Página 48 - Millions of spiritual creatures walk the earth Unseen, both when we wake, and when we sleep : All these with ceaseless praise his works behold Both day and night. How often from the steep Of echoing hill or thicket have we heard Celestial voices to the midnight air, Sole, or responsive each to other's note, Singing their great Creator...
Página 379 - I see a bridge, said I, standing in the midst of the tide. The bridge thou seest, said he, is human life ; consider it attentively.

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