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È LE GI E S.
In imitation of TIBULLU S.

ElegÝ the First

The COMFORTS of a retired LIFE.

me filva cavusque
Tutus ab infidiis tenui folabitur ervo.

VIRGIL

T ET the pale miser view with eager eyes
1 In glittering heaps his hoarded treasure rise ;
Let trumpets rouze the hardy wretch to arms,
And banish sweet répose with dire alarris:
In humble poverty securely blest .
No cares distract me, and no fears molest.
Nor selfish avarice taints with mean desires;
Nor thirst of fame to perilous action fires.

Hail, tranquil poverty, the muse's friend,
Whom health, and peace, and fober joys attend !
My lowly cell affords a calm retreat,
Scorn'd by the rich, nor envy'd by the great:
My lowly cell can all my wants releive :
What more have gaudy palaces to give ?

From restless folly free, and noisy strife,
How sweet the comforts of a country life!
Now can I with a little live content,
And laugh at fools on wealth and business bent.
Now can I shun the dog-star's scorching heat
By purling streams beneath the cool retreat.

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NUMB: I.

A rufiic

A rustic now, each wanton branch I curb,
Each budding flow'r I tend, each springing herb.
Now the sharp goad I bear with patient hand,
And chide the ling’ring ox along the land;
Now in my bosom footh some straggling lamb,
Pining with grief, and bleating for his dam.
My little herd, ye rav’ning wolves, forbear ;
Ye thieves, learn pity, nor my fold ensnare :
Fly hence, and to some wealthy churl away,
Where numerous flocks afford a larger prey.

Vain pelf I would not wish, nor stores require
Of harvests hoarded by a careful fire.
Give me, kind heav'n, with pleasing labours spent
To rest my wearied limbs in sweet content.
Give me, but oh! how fruitless is my pray’r!
Some fond, consenting, easy, love-fick fair.
With her the live-long hours I'd prattling waste,
Act o'er each amorous wilę and courtship past :
Or when the wintry south tempestuous blows,
Lock'd in my circling Arms I'd grasp her close,
And lulld by drizling show'rs securely doze.

Be wealth his prize, who tempts the treacherous waves, Scorns the loud tempeft, and the whirlwind braves. All gold should perish in its native mine, E’er for my absence my kind girl should pine. Peru's rich mountains would too dearly buy One pitying tear from her, one tender sigh.

Be arms, ye dauntless champions, your delights
Go tempt the dangers of the vigorous fight;
On hostile fields Britannia's rights maintaing
Or vindicate her empire o'er the main.
Me gentler Love in soft resistless chains
A willing slave to beauty's pow's detains.

Renowning

Renown, vain phantom, I to others leave :
The hours with you, my Delia, to deceive,
All honour I resign: now, faucy fame,
Call me a coward; I glory in the name.

O may I dying view that lovely face,
And seal my parting with a fond embrace !
Then fhalt thou eager catch my fleeting breath,
Then grasp my faultering hand benumb'd in death,
And when the fable train of mourning friends
In dismal pomp my breathless corps attends,
Wilt thou not then hang madly o'er my bier,
And wafh my grave with many a gushing tear?
Yes, thou wilt weep: I know thy tender breast
With all the softness of thy sex posseft:
But, left my restless manes you offend,
Beat not that bosom, nor those tresses rend,
Taught by thy grief what virgin will not mourn?
What youth not pitying thee will thence return ?
For ev'ry heart shall feel the common woe,
And ev'ry eye with streams of sorrow flow,

Then let us now the present hour improve
With mutual joys, and waste it all in love.
Death soon will come, his head in darkness vaild;

Then, while the fates permit, to pleasure yield.
Dull sluggish age creeps on with silent pace,
And steals unnotic'd on our short-liv'd race.
Dim burns the lover's flame, or quite expires,
When aged wrinkles suit not warm desires.
How vile, when doating grey-beards idly prate
In fond endearments with a hoary pate!

Whilst our hot blood with youthful ardour boils, The streets we scour, and mix in midnight broils.

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Bold and expert in Venus' soft alarms,
A harmless warfare ours, and pointless arms.
Go, ye ambitious, be in fight renown'd,
Display your banners, and your trumpets found;
Be crown’d with laurel, the proud victor's claim,
Heap wealth on wealth, and deathless be your fame.
If Delia deign to share my poor retreat,
Kind heav'n can add no more, to make my bliss compleat,

B. T.

If this is approved by the publick, the AUTHOR will occa

fronally oblige us with more ELEGIES in the same style and manner.

CHORUS at the end of the second ACT

of the Hecuba of Euripides.

V E breezes mild and gentle gales,
1 Whose breath propitious fills the swelling fails,

And bids the vessel swiftly glide
Thro' angry seas, and stem the stubborn tide,

O whither, whither will ye bear me hence
To haughty pow'r a slave and lawless insolence ?

II.
Will ye alas ! in Doric lands
Subject me to some proud Greek's ftern commands ?

Or waft me to the fertile coast
Of Pthia, where in wand'ring mazes loft.

The fam'd Apidanus rolls his silver floods .
Thro' meads of verdant hue, and shadowy darkling woods?

. Or III.

Or must I to the isle repair,
Select and sacred to LATONA fair,

Where verdant laurels never fear
And lofty pines their blooming branches rear ;

To join the youthful choir's united voice,
And sing of Dịan chaste, whose care the bow employs ?

IV. .
For lofty Athens must I part,
To shade the curious vest with nicest art,

To paint MINERVA’s glorious car,
Adorn the tapestry with scenes of war,

Or point the forked bolt with flaming rage,
On Titans hurl'd, that durft heav'n's awful king engage?

See, blazing fires from hapless Ilion rife,
While clouds of circling smoke obscure the skies.

O dire distress ! why only am I left,
Of children, parents, brethren, all bereft?

Why thus reserv'd a prey to proud domain,
Far hence in foreign lands to drag the galling chain ?

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An ADDRESS to an ELBOW.CHAIR

lately new cloathed,

ury dear companion and my faithful friend,
IV If ORPHEUS taught the listning oaks to bend,
If stone and rubbish at Amphion's call
Danc'd into form, and built the Theban wall,

Why

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