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THEP UBLIC GOOD ADVERTISER.

UNITED KINGDOM
TEMPERANCE & GENERAL PROVIDENT INSTITUTION,

39, MOORGATE-STREET, LONDON.
For Mutual Life Assurance, Endowments for Children, Annuities, &c.
Chairman.

Secretary.
ROBERT WARNER, Esq.

THEODORE COMPTON, Esq., F.1.A,

ADVANTAGES OF THIS INSTITUTION. DIXEMPTION FROM PROBATE AND LEGACY DUTY, by means of I the privilege of appointing Nominees to receive the Sums assured, without the ex

pense and delay of proving a Will, or obtaining Letters of Administration.
LOWER PREMIUMS than usual in other Mutual Assurance Offices.
No Law Suits. Disputes, if any, settled by Arbitrators, whose decision is final.
No individual liability, nor useless capital to absorb the profits.
Every Member has a right to attend and vote at the Annual Meeting of the Assured.
THE ENTIRE PROFITS DIVIDED AMONG THE ASSURED.
Lowest Rate of Mortality of any Life Office,

The premiums in this Office are considerably lower than in most other Mutual Offices. Thus, at age 2), the premium to assure £1000 at some of the Offices, will assure about £1,350 at this ; being equivalent to a certain and immediate Bonus of £350, at a reduction of 35 per cent. on the premium ; exclusive of the actual surplus to be periodically divided.

THE FIRST DIVISION OF PROFITS WILL TAKE PLACE AT THE END OF 1850.

The Office has issued nearly 4000 Policies, and is now issuing upwards of twenty per week. Nearly 120 Policies were issued in October.

PHONOGRAPHY,

OR THE NEW AND POPULAR -
SYSTEM OF PHONETIC SHORTHAND;

: AS LECIBLE AS COMMON WRITING:
** Instruction, Private and Public, in the above highly tuseful art, daily,

. . From 9 A.M. to 9 P.M., by
Messrs. Pitman and Reed,

AT THE ..
PHONOGRAPHIC INSTITUTION, 316, HOLBORN,

- (Near Chancery Lane,) Where explanatory documents, and all information on the subject may be obtained.

TERMS FOR THE COURSE OF INSTRUCTION, Consisting of Nine Lessons on Phonography and Verbatim Reporting, in which a perfect knowledge of the art is imparted:

$ 8. d. i Private Tuition, One Individual..

1 1 0 Private Parties of Three,....

.........9......... each pupil 0 10 6 Private Parties of Six,........................

........... 2 0 7 6. Private Classes for Ladies, 12 A,M., 3 and 7

0 7 6 . Private Classes for Gentlemen, 84 P.M.,..

0 7,6 Public Classes for Gentlemen, 84 P.M., ....

............

0 5 0 A Private Class commences on the first MONDAY of every Month, ........at 8 P.M,

And a Public Class commences on the first TUESDAY of every Month,.....at 85 P.M. en Tickets for the Classes may be obtained at the Institu on and at the Phonetic Depot,

Paternoster Row,

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THE

PUBLIC GOOD.

Μ Α Ν. Man is the soul of the world—the in- , would awaken in him the deep musing tellectual and moral sensorium of na- of philosophic thought, or moral feel. ture. He is not, indeed, the creating ing, or reflection. cause of things, nor is he the efficient Not so with man! He opens his energy by which the various operations percipient faculties on the surrounding of nature are carried on. He does not world, and light with its variety of hues sustain the sun in its bright sphere, and visual properties of external things, nor cause the light and heat to come and the various odours of the carth, down upon us as an all-pervading spirit. and all harmonious and discordant He does not wheel the planets in their sounds, and the qualities of taste and eternal rounds, nor roll the earth upon touch, rush in and make their impresher axis, nor urge the moon along her sions upon his intellectual and moral silent way. Nor does he heave the sensibilities, and awaken there the ele. ocean's tides—nor pour the streams and ments and energies of mind and moral rivers from their fountains-nor direct feeling. And thus all substances and their currents in their winding paths. qualities and things surrounding man He does not clothe the earth with vege become to him the great alphabet of tation, nor embellish it with verdure, knowledge. The numerous properties and the various hues and tints and which inform his senses, seem to come forms of beauty, nor fill it with rich in as with intelligence to inspire his infragrance and delicious fruits. Nor | tellectual operations, and to constitute does he quicken this magnificent thea a part of his own mind; and he throws tre of being with the numberless forms out his thoughts and feelings over all and modes of animal existence. Yet, but things, and associates and sympathizes for man, to what great intellectual and with them, till he becomes, as it were, moral end would all these things exist ? a part of them, and they of him, and

The grazing ox might crop the grass, until he learns to arrange these various and, for all the purposes of his nature, elements into systems, and elaborates instinctively discriminate the odours of from them the profound truths and the earth, and slake his thirst in the principles of science ! clear stream; and, when the summer's The beautiful, the harmonious, the heat became oppressive to him, he sublime, associated with external things, might seek the cool shade of the forest; are but the inward sentiments of his and, in his ruminating moments, he own soul, awakened by those things might raise his head, and on his unen- and breathed out upon them, till they quiring eye the sun or moon, or the far | become, to his imagination and his feel. distant star, might pour its light; but ings, invested as with an intelligent neither the herbage, nor the fragrance, and sympathising spirit, which holds nor the varied hues of the vegetable communion with him in his various kingdom, nor the beautiful freshness of moods of mirth, and melancholy, and the morning, nor the noon-tide splen- poetic musing, and solemn meditation. dour, nor the soothing silence of the The mountains, and the valleys, and summer twilight, nor the magnificence the streams, the deep forests, and the of the nocturnal firmament, nor aught spreading lawns, the ocean's foaming of creation's loveliness or sublimity, beach, the craggy cliff, the thundering

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