Gaieties and Gravities;: A Series of Essays, Comic Tales, and Fugitive Vagaries. Now First Collected, Volumen2

Portada
Henry Colburn, 1825
 

Comentarios de la gente - Escribir un comentario

No encontramos ningún comentario en los lugares habituales.

Páginas seleccionadas

Otras ediciones - Ver todas

Términos y frases comunes

Pasajes populares

Página 263 - Ring out, ye crystal Spheres! Once bless our human ears (If ye have power to touch our senses so), And let your silver chime Move in melodious time; And let the base of Heaven's deep organ blow, And with your ninefold harmony Make up full consort to the angelic symphony.
Página 261 - Resides in that heavenly word! More precious than silver and gold, Or all that this earth can afford. But the sound of the church-going bell These valleys and rocks never heard, Never sighed at the sound of a knell, Or smiled when a sabbath appeared.
Página 8 - Lo, the poor Indian, whose untutored mind Sees God in clouds, and hears Him in the wind...
Página 297 - That not to know at large of things remote From use, obscure and subtle, but to know That which before us lies in daily life, Is the prime wisdom...
Página 56 - Ay, but to die, and go we know not where ; To lie in cold obstruction, and to rot; This sensible warm motion to become A kneaded clod...
Página 196 - Whatever spirit, careless of his charge, His post neglects, or leaves the fair at large, Shall feel sharp vengeance soon o'ertake his sins, Be...
Página 127 - Angels and ministers of grace defend us! Be thou a spirit of health or goblin damn'd, Bring with thee airs from heaven or blasts from hell, Be thy intents wicked or charitable, Thou com'st in such a questionable shape, That I will speak to thee: I'll call thee Hamlet, King, father, royal Dane, O, answer me!
Página 81 - Paul, though in a different sense, he dies daily, and only lives in the night. He deforms nature, while he intends to adorn her, like Indians that hang jewels in their lips and noses. His ears are perpetually drilled with a fiddlestick. He endures pleasures with less patience than other men do their pains" (Butler's Posthumous Works, vol.
Página 204 - Thy two breasts are like two young roes that are twins : thy neck is as a tower of ivory. Thine eyes like the fishpools in Heshbon, by the gate of Bath-rabbim : thy nose is as the tower of Lebanon which looketh toward Damascus.
Página 335 - This is the excellent foppery of the world, that, when we are sick in fortune, — often the surfeit of our own behaviour, — we make guilty of our disasters the sun, the moon, and the stars...

Información bibliográfica