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Mer.

Why, may one ask ?
Rom. I dreamt a dream to-night.

Mer. O, then, I see, queen Mab hath been with you.
She is the fairies' midwife; and she comes
In shape no bigger than an agate-stone
On the fore-finger of an alderman,
Drawn with a team of little atomies
Athwart men's noses as they lie asleep:
Her wagon-spokes made of long spinners' legs,
The cover, of the wings of grasshoppers ;
The traces, of the smallest spider's web;
The collars, of the moonshine's watry beams :
Her whip, of cricket's bone; the lash, of film;
Her wagoner, a small gray-coated gnat,
Not half so big as a round little worm
Prick'd from the lazy finger of a maid :

warene?
Her chariot is an empty hazel-nut,
Made by the joiner squirrel, or old grub,
Time out of mind the fairies' coach-makers.
And in this state she gallops night by night
Through lovers' brains, and then they dream of love;
On courtiers' knees, that dream on court’sies straight :
O'er lawyers' fingers, who straight dream on fees ;
O’er ladies' lips, who straight on kisses dream;
Sometime she gallops o'er a courtier's nose,
And then dreams he of smelling out a suit :
And sometimes comes she with a tithe-pig's tail,
Tickling a parson's nose as 'a lies asleep,
Then dreams he of another benefice:
Sometime she driveth o'er a soldier's neck,
And then dreams be of cutting foreign throats,
Of breaches, ambuscadoes, Spanish blades,
Of healths five fathom deep; and then anon
Drums in his ear; at which he starts, and wakes;
And, being thus frighted, swears a prayer or two,
And sleeps again.
Rom.

Peace, peace, Mercutio, peace;
Thou talk'st of nothing.
Mer.

True, I talk of dreams;
Which are the children of an idle brain,
Begot of nothing but vain fantasy ;
Which is as thin of substance as the air ;
And more inconstant than the wind, who wooes
Even now the frozen bosom of the north,
And, being anger'd, puffs away from thence,
Turning

his face to the dew-dropping south.
Ben. This wind, you talk of, blows us from ourselves ;
Supper is done, and we shall come too late.

Rom. I fear, too early : for my mind misgives,

:

Some consequence, yet hanging in the stars,
Shall bitterly begin his fearful date
With this night's revels; and expire the term
Of a despised life, clos’d in my breast,
By some vile forfeit of untimely death :
But He, that hath the steerage of my course,
Direct my sail !-On, gentlemen.

[Eceunt.
SCENE V.-A Hall in Capulet's House.
Enter CAPULET, fc. with the Guests, and the Maskers.
Cap. You are welcome, gentlemen! I have seen the day,
That I have worn a visor; and could tell
A whispering tale in a fair lady's ear,
Such as would please ;—'tis gone,

'tis
gone,

'tis

gone You are welcome, gentlemen !—Come, musicians, play.

[Music plays, and they dance. Rom. What lady's that, which doth enrich the hand of yonder knight?

Serv. I know not, sir.

Rom. O, she doth teach the torches to burn bright !
Her beauty hangs upon the cheek of night
Like a rich jewel in an Ethiop's ear:
The measure done, I'll watch her place of stand,
And, touching hers, make happy my rude hand.
Did my heart love till now ? forswear it, sight !
For I ne'er saw true beauty till this night.

Tyb. This, by his voice, should be a Montague :
Fetch me my rapier, boy :-What! dares the slave
Come hither, covered with an antic face,
To fleer and scorn at our solemnity ?
Now, by the stock and honor of my kin,
To strike him dead I hold it not a sin.

Cap. Why, how now, kinsman ? wherefore storm you so ?

Tyb. Uncle, this is a Montague, our foe ;
A villain, that is hither come in spite,
To scorn at our solemnity this night.

Cap. Young Romeo is’t ?
Tyb.

'Tis he, that villain Romeo,
Cap. Content thee, gentle coz, let him alone,
He bears him like a portly gentleman;
And, to say truth, Verona brags of him,
To be a virtuous and well-governd youth:
I would not for the wealth of all this town,
Here in my house do him disparagement :
Therefore be patient, take no note of him,
it is my

will; the which if thou respect,
Show a fair presence, and put off these frowns,
An ill-beseeming semblance for a feast.

Tyb. It fits, when such a villain is a guest ;
I'll not endure him.
Сар. .

He shall be endur'd;
Am I the master here, or you ? go to.
Be quiet,

cousin, or—I'll make you quiet.
Tyb. Patience perforce with wilful choler meeting
Makes my flesh tremble in their different greeting.
I will withdraw : but this intrusion shall,
Now seeming sweet, convert to bitter gall.

[Exil. Rom. If I profane with my unworthy hand (TO JULIET. This holy shrine, the gentle fine is this,

Jul. Good pilgrim, you do wrong your hand too much,
For palm to palm is holy palmer's kiss.

Rom. Have not saints lips, and holy palmers too ?
Jul. Ay, pilgrim, lips that they must use in prayer.
Rom. Thus, then, dear saint, let lips put up their prayer. [Sa-
Nurse. Madam, your mother craves a word with you. [lutes her.
Rom. What is her mother ?
Nurse.

Marry, bachelor,
Her mother is the lady of the house,
And a good lady, and a wise, and virtuous :
I nurs'd her daughter, that you talk'd withal ;
I tell you,-he, that can lay hold of her,
Shall have the chinks.
Rom.

Is she a Capulet ?
O dear account ! my life is my foe's debt.

Ben. Away, begone; the sport is at the best.
Rom. Ay, so I fear; the more is my unrest.
Cap. Nay, gentlemen, prepare not to be gone ;
We have a trifling foolish banquet towards.
Is it e'en so? Why, then I thank you all ;
I thank you, honest gentlemen; good night:-
I'll to my rest.

[Exeunt all but JULIET, and Nurse.
Jul. Come hither, nurse ; What is yon gentleman ?
Nurse. The son and heir of old Tiberio.
Jul. What’s he, that now is going out of door ?
Nurse. Marry, that, I think, be young

Petruchio.
Jul. What's he, that follows there, that would not dance ?
Nurse. I know not.

Jul. Go, ask his name :-if he be married,
My grave is like to be my wedding bed.

Nurse. His name is Romeo, and a Montague ; The only son of your great enemy.

Jul. My only love sprung from my only hate !
Too early seen unknown, and known too late !

Nurse. What's this? What's this?
Jul.

A rhyme I learn'd even now
Of one I danc'd withal.

[One calls within, JULIET, Nurse.

Anon, anon:
Come, let's away: the strangers all are gone.

[Ereunt ACT II.

Romeo, struck with the beauty and character of Juliet, forgets his “ Rosaline." He disengages himself from Mercutio and Benvolio, and enters Capulet's garden, to seek an interview with Juliet.

SCENE II.-Capulet's Garden.

Enter ROMEO.
Rom. He jests at scars, that never felt a wound. -

[JULIET appears above, at a window.
But, soft! what light through yonder window breaks !
It is the east, and Juliet is the sun !
Arise, fair sun, and kill the envious moon,
Who is already sick and pale with grief,
That thou her maid art far more fair than she :
She speaks, yet she says nothing ; What of that ?
Her eye discourses, I will answer it.-
I am ioo bold, 'tis not to me she speaks :
Two of the fairest stars in all the heaven,
Having some business, do entreat her eyes
To twinkle in their spheres till they return.
What if her eyes were there, they in her head ?
The brightness of her cheek would shame those stars,
As daylight doth a lamp; her eye in heaven
Would through the airy region stream so bright,
That birds would sing, and think it were not night.
See, how she leans her cheek upon her hand !
O, that I were a glove upon that hand,
That I might touch that cheek!
Jul.

Ah me!
Rom.

She speaks :
O, speak again, bright angel! for thou art
As glorious to this night, being o'er my head,
As is a winged messenger of heaven
Unto the white-upturned wond'ring eyes
Of mortals, that fall back to gaze on him,
When he bestrides the lazy pacing clouds,
And sails upon the bosom of the air.

Jul. O Romeo, Romeo! wherefore art thou Romeo ?
Deny thy father, and refuse thy name :
Or, if thou wilt not, be but sworn my love,
And I'll no longer be a Capulet.

Rom. Shall I hear more, or shall I speak at this ? Aside.

Jul. 'Tis but thy name, that is my enemy;
What's in a name ? that which we call a rose,
By any other name would smell as sweet ;
So Romeo would, were he not Romeo calld,

Retain that dear perfection which he owes,
Without that title :-Romeo, doff thy name;
And for that name, which is no part of thee,
Take all myself.
Rom.

I take thee at thy word:
Call me but love, and I'll be new baptized ;
Henceforth I never will be Romeo.

Jul. What man art thou, that, thus bescreen' in night,
So stumblest on my counsel ?
Rom.

By a name
I know not how to tell thee who I am:
My name, dear saint, is hateful to myself,
Because it is an enemy to thee.

Jul. My ears have not yet drunk a hundred words
Of that tongue's utterance, yet I know the sound;
Art thou not Romeo, and a Montague ?

Rom. Neither, fair saint, if either thee dislike.

Jul. How cam’st thou hither, tell me ? and wherefore ? The orchard walls are high, and hard to climb; And the place death, considering who thou art, If any of my kinsmen find thee here.

Róm. With love's light wings did I o'er-perch these walls. For stony limits cannot hold love out; And what love can do, that dares love attempt ; Therefore thy kinsmen are no let to me.

Jul. If they do see thee, they will murder thee. Rom. Alack! there lies more peril in thine eye, Than twenty of their swords; look thou but sweet, And I am proof against their enmity.

Jul. I would not for the world they saw thee here:
By whose direction found’st thou out this place ?

Rom. By love, who first did prompt me to inquire;
He lent me counsel, and I lent him eyes.
I am no pilot; yet, wert thou as far
As that vast-shore wash'd with the furthest sea,
I would adventure for such merchandise.

Jul. Thou know'st, the mask of night is on my face ;
Else would a maiden blush bepaint my cheek,
For that which thou hast heard me speak to-night.
Fain would I dwell on form, fain, fain deny
What I have spoke; But farewell compliment !
Dost thou love me? I know, thou wilt say-Ay;
And I will take thy word : yet, if thou swear’st,
Thou may’st prove false ; at lovers' perjuries,
They say, Jove laughs. O, gentle Romeo,
If thou dost love, pronounce it faithfully:
Or if thou think'st I am too quickly won,
['ll frown and be perverse, and say thee ray.
So thou wilt woo; but, else, not for the world.

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