The History of Modern Europe: With an Account of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, and a View of the Progress of Society from the Rise of the Modern Kingdoms to the Peace of Paris in 1763, Volumen2

Portada
G.G.J. and J. Robinson, and A. Hamilton, 1789
 

Comentarios de la gente - Escribir un comentario

No encontramos ningún comentario en los lugares habituales.

Páginas seleccionadas

Contenido


Otras ediciones - Ver todas

Términos y frases comunes

Pasajes populares

Página 329 - But let not your grace ever imagine that your poor wife will ever be brought to acknowledge a fault where not so much as a thought thereof preceded. And, to speak a truth, never prince had wife more loyal in all duty, and in all true affection, than you have ever found in Anne Boleyn...
Página 428 - Preserve an inviolable regard for religion; maintain the Catholic faith in its purity; let the laws of your country be...
Página 408 - Rogers, besides the care of his own preservation, lay under other powerful temptations to compliance : he had a wife whom he tenderly loved, and ten children ; yet such was his serenity after his condemnation, that the jailors, it is said, waked him from a sound sleep when the hour of his execution approached. He had desired to see his wife before he died ; but Gardiner told him, that he was a priest, and could not possibly have a wife...
Página 437 - ... of which he had always been remarkably fond, and to which his genius was peculiarly turned. With this view he had engaged Turriano, one of the most ingenious artists of that age, to accompany him in his retreat.
Página 254 - Each of them can bring into the field forces sufficient for our defence. But as the king of Spain is of German extraction ; as he is a member and prince of the empire by the territories which...
Página 257 - sgenerofity for his fafety, he landed at Dover, in his way from Spain to the Low Countries. The king of England, who was on his way to France, charmed with fuch an inftance of confidence, haftened to receive his royal...
Página 299 - VI. capable of fuch a cieteftable action, were little attended to, and lefs regarded r. It is evident, however, that the Emperor could have no inducement to perpetrate fuch a crime, as Francis was ftill in the vigour of life himfelf, and had two fons, befide the Dauphin, grown up to a good age. That fingle confideration, without mentioning the Emperor's general character, unblemifhed by the imputation of any deed refembling this in atrocity, is more than fufficient to counterbalance the weight of...
Página 262 - I am lawfully called," said he, " to appear in that city, and thither will I go in the name of the Lord, though as many devils as there are tiles on the houses were there combined against me.
Página 305 - Spanifh fubje&s, with a finall but fplcndid train of an hundred perfons. He was met on the frontiers of France by the dauphin and the duke of Orleans, who offered to go into Spain, and remain there as hoftages, till he...
Página 273 - ... on horseback, he ordered one of his attendants to place him under a tree, with his face towards the enemy ; then fixing his eyes on the guard of his sword, which he held up instead of a cross, he addressed his prayers to God, and in this posture, which became his character both as a soldier and as a Christian, he calmly awaited the approach of death.

Información bibliográfica