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ART. 10. MONTHLY SUMMARY.

GREAT BRITAIN AND IRELAND.

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EUROPE.

been missing since last June. No discovery
in relation to then! has yet been made.-

Among the articles are, “ The George, diais generally supposed that the popula- mond sword, and invaluable button and

tion of this country has been increasing loop.” The fact that they were missing more rapidly during the last century, than was not made public until since the death of that of the other countries of Europe. We the Queen. believe, that with the exception of Spain, The Earl of Mulgrave, in consequence of almost all the other states of Europe have continued indisposition, has requested leave increased at an equal, and some, such as to resign the office of Master General of the Russia, at a much greater rate. Mr. Rick Ordnance. The resignation was accepted map,

in the preface to the last population by the council, and it was agreed to offer returns, states the population, of England the vacant seat, if agreeable to the Prince and Wales, in 1700, at 5,475,000, and in Regent, to the Duke of Wellington. 1811, it was 10,488,000. In Sweden Pro- From one of the late London papers, we per, one of the poorest countries of Europe, have abstracted, from the official report, the ihe population in 1716, was 907,969. In following statement of the general head of 1816, Sweden Proper had 2,464,941 inha- expenditure of the British government, for bitants. At the former period, too, Sweden the year ending on the 5th day of January, had only 17 iron works, one allum work, 1818. one glass-bouse, one paper-mill, and eight On account of the National Debt.' manufacturing establishments. At the lat. For account of inteter it had 560 iron works and mines, and rest,

1.29,166,084 12 8 1.4 901 manufacturing establishments. We do For charges of ma. not certainly exaggerate, when we say, nagement,

284,589 11 11 1-2 that the population of Europe, notwithstand- For reduction of naing all its wars, &c. has at least doubled tional debt, 14,657,559 3 11 3-4 during the last 100 years. Government have already received on

44,108,233 8 7 1-2 the new loan of 27,000,0001., 5,450,0001. in For interest on exmoney, and 14,933,0001. in exchequer bills, chequer bills, 1,815,926 17 81-4 leaving between six and seven millions to For expenses of the be forthcoming.

civil list,

2,303,622 2 9 1-2 In 1788, when Pitt came into power, the Civil government of whole expense of government did not ex.

Scotland,

130,646 3 4 ceed 12,500,0001.; now the poor rates ap- Other payments, in proach that sum.

anticipation of exThe Manchester papers state, that the ma- chequer receipts, jority of persons who had turned out for

(bounties for fishewages, had returned to their employments, ries, manufactures, a part of the extra wages which they de- corn, &c.)

451,403 10 6 3-4 manded having been paid, and a further ad- The navy,

6,473,062 13 8 3-4 vance promised, as the demand for particu• The ordnance, 1,435,401 9 2 lar articles of manufactures increased. Ac. The army,

9,614,864 4 9 3-4 cording to the prices at present paid, the Loans and remitfine spinners, on large mules, say 300 spin- tances to Ireland dles each, can earn from 30 to 35 shillings and other coun. per week-on mules of 180 or 200 spindles, tries,

33,272 18 by from 22 to 24 shillings. An advance of four Issues from approprishillings on the pound has been paid the ated funds for local weavers, though the papers mention that

purposes,

42,685 y 41-4 even the full advance demanded, 7 shillings, Miscellaneous would not enable one weaver in twenty to vices at home and earn 12s. per week. The fustian weavers abroad,

2,466,483 173-4 had obtained their advance-they now receive 2s.6d. per lb. for what they recently

68,875,541 18 1-2 received but 1s. The dyers have had their At the late assizes for Warwickshire, sixty. wages increased 2s. per week; and they two persons were sentenced to death, five now receive from 12s. to 15s. per week. of whom were afterwards ordered for exe

The Queen of England died at 1 o'clock cution. Fifty-two were sentenced to variin the afternoon of the 17th of last Novem. ous terms of transportation, and fifty-six to ber. Her disease (a dropsy) terminated in other punishments. Of 229 prisoners, of a mortification ; and it is said she expired' which the calendar consisted, nearly one with great composure and without a strug. half had not attained the age of twenty gle.

years. A part of the King's jewels, it is said, bave It appears by a return presented to the

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SPAIN.

House of Commons, (and which was order. November 3, having been detained two ed to be printed on the 5th of June last,) days by indisposition. The Emperor Alexthat the number of criminal offenders com- ander arrived at Paris October 28, visited mitted for trial in England and in Wales the king, and departed the same day, during the last 13 years, has increased the last year to more than triple the number of the former year; that the number sen- Intelligence from Madrid states, that the tenced to death was nearly in that propor- pope, in commisseration, as it is asserted, of tion ; but that the number of executions the deplorable circumstances of the Spanish was not one half in proportion to the num- treasury, has allowed the king to make a ber sentenced. The numbers were as fol- temporary and contingent appropriation of lows:

part of the income of the church, by susIn the years 1805 and 1817. pending the appointment to ecclesiastic dig. Committed for trial 4605 13032 nities and benefices for the space of two Sentenced to death

380 1302 years, and converting their revenues to the Executed

68 115 use of the government. Hardly ever, since being one in five in 1805_and one in eleven the emission of French assignats, was nain 1817.

tional paper in a more depreciated condiThe whole of the infantry of the British tion than that of Spain. The consolidated army of occupation, with the exception of vales are 40 per cent. below par; the nonthe guards and the 52d regiment,' (left in consolidated 84 per cent.--that is, 100 are possession of the fortresses until the 15th worth 16; and the loss on the ordinary instant,) have been embarked at, and sailed vales is 75 per cent. The Cortes of Navarre from Calais, in the short space of 72 hours. have furnished (or promised) a supply of They are all safely landed in England. 800,000 piastres, (168,0001.) payable in five

The total number, including men, women years. and children, amount to very nearly 15,000 Spain has issued, at various times, one persons, besides 630 horses.

hundred thousand, five hundred millions of Intelligence has been received from the [reals] royal ralesa sort of exchequer exploring expedition in the interior of Africa, bills which were promised to be redeemed, under Major Gray. They reached Gaylam but are not; which bore an interest that has in seven weeks from Cayai, with the loss of not been paid. A third part of these have Mr. Burton and one soldier, and were to re- been funded at 4 per cent. interest-the main there till the end of the rains.

other two-thirds are indefinitely postponed.

Great efforts are making to send troops

and munitions of war to America. It is An ordinance of the king has been issued said that 2500 infantry, and 300 picked artilfor calling from the classes the polite" legi- lery, will immediately sail from Cadiz to timate" phrase for the old and abused word Havana. " conscription--horrible French conscrip- Letters from Cadiz mention, that as a retion"- -a new army of forty thousand men. lief under the present exigencies, the SpaEach department is to furnish its number nish government has determined to carry according to its population-one to every into effect a loan of eighty millions of rials, 723 persons of the whole population-or, op 850,0001. sterling, but in a very curious allowing one-fifth thereof to be able to carry

This loan is portioned out and arms, one man out of every 146 persons so allotted to the maritime towns, such as capable.

Cadiz, Alicant, Malaga, Barcelona, St. AnIt is calculated, in a Paris paper, that the dre, Bilboa, &c. where it is to be raised in French monarchy contains 29,800,000 in certain ratios. To Cadiz four millions of habitants, of whom 108,000 speak Basque, rials, or 400,0001. have been assigned, and 900,000 speak the Kymrique, or Low Bre- the rest in proportion to their size and comton, 160,000 speak Italian, 1,700,000 speak mercial importance. German, and the remaining 27,000,000 speak But it will be proper to convey some idea French. It is also calculated, that of these how these loans are raised in Spain, as our there are 26,400,000 Catholics, 2,300,000' readers may then judge if that is the term to Calvinists, 1,100,000 Lutherans, 60,000 be applied to them. An order comes down Jews, 2,000 Hertenhutiens, and 550 Qua- to the Cadiz consulado, or Board of Trade, kers.

for example, purporting that a loan of four The king of France had convoked the millions of rials must be effected in the city, Legislative Chambers for November 30. for a special purpose. The president conOf the fifty-five newly elected members of venes the merchants, and the order is laid the Chamber of Deputies, forty are known before them.. Warm debates take place, to be decidedly ministerial. Among the op- and the council separates without any thing position are Manuel Bedach, and La Fay. being done. The military governor urges ette. Terneaux is elected in Paris, in op- for the execution of the royal order, and a position to Benjamin Constant. The French list of merchants is made out; and accord. funds for the few last days had been rapidly ing to their supposed wealth and traffic, a recovering from the depression previously division of the whole sum takes place among experienced. The king of Prussia left Paris them. The amount that falls on each is not Vol. IV.--No. IV.

38

FRANCE.

manner.

BARBARY STATES.

SOUTH AMERICA.

tified to him ; and wo to him if he does not

AFRICA. soon carry the money to the governor. So much for a Spanish loan in the present day.

A letter from Algiers says: Since the GERMANY.

death of Aly there has been only one execuAll the allied sovereigns, except the Em

tion here; it was that of his brother-in-law, peror of Austria, had left Aix la Chapelle, to visit Paris. Some of their ministers remain- and his brother, a youth of 13 years of age;

an Arab of the name of Hagdi Mustapha, ed to adjust minor matters.

The fortress of Valenciennes has been de- they were both tortured for fourteen days, livered up to France; and, after a grand re

in various ways, got no sleep, and Hagdi view of the arıny of occupation, the troops ceived first 1000 strokes, and after that four

was most severely bastinadoed.

He rewere withdrawing. Considerable deser

or five hundred daily. After he had receivtions are said to have occurred.

ed 4,500 strokes, in this manner he was sent We are not distinctly informed of what home, where he died two days after. The has been transacted at Aix la Chapelle, fur: Turks feared this family very much, and ther than that which related to France. It have therefore extirpated it. is stated, however, that the high allies had refused to interfere between Spain and her

AMERICA. colonies, but considered the neutrality of the European powers as suitable to the state

Artigas still harasses the Portuguese at of commerce which they wish to maintain Monte Viedo. About the 1st of September, with the new world. The affairs of Bava- he had an engagement with them at three ria and Baden appear to be settled.

leagues distance from their lines, in which General Gourgou, who lately addressed a letter to the Archduchess Maria Louisa, with the loss of only one man.

he captured 200 horses, and 50 or 60 men, begging her to interfere with the congress Brazil.-Produce at Pernambuco is said in favour of her busband and his master, is

to be scarce on account of the conscription said to have received for answer to his ap- of the country people, when bringing their plication, a present of about 30,000 francs, articles to the city. They are seized upon and positive orders to address her imperial for soldiers without the least ceremony-highness no more upon the subject.

their houses are entered, and, without any The accounts from Frankfort state that previous notice, all the males are dragged the intended army of the Germanic Con- off, and sent to distant garrisons. federation is to consist of ten corps, the first, second and third, amounting to 94,822 men, to be furnished by Austria; the fourth, Venezuela.-Lord Cochrane, in a frigate fifth and sixth, amounting to 79,234, to con- of 44 guns, with some other vessels, has sist entirely of Prussians; the seventh to be arrived in the neighbourhood of Margaretta. formed of Bavarians, in number 35,600; He was welcomed with great rejoicings. the eighth corps is to be made up by the Brion, it was supposed, would immediately kingdom of Saxony 12,000, Wurtemberg join him, and M Gregor is said to have sail23,955, Baden 10,000, Hohenzollern 501, ed from England with 3,000 men. When Lichtenstein 55, in all 36,511. The ninth these all act together, the fate of the Spanish corps is to consist of many contingents, viz. power overVenezuela and Grenada is sealed. Electoral Hesse 5,400, the Grand Duchy of The privateers are also very active, and Hesse 6,193, Luxemburg 2,141, Nassau have nearly annihilated the commerce un3,028, Saxe Weymar 2,010, Gotha 1,857, der the royal flag. They are charged with Coburg 800, Meinungen 544, Hildburghau- committing many excesses. A Dutch fri. sen 297, Anbalt Dessau 529, Anhalt Brin- gate from Curracoa, and a British frigate burg 390, Anhalt Gæthen 325, Schwartz- from Jamaica, are cruising to restrain them. burg Sondershausen 451, Schwartzburg Ru- Chili is quiet. The patriot army therein dolstadt 539, Reuss, eldest branch, 223, is preparing for an expedition to Peru. The younger branch 522, *Hesse Homburg 200, royalists had evacuated Talcuhana. The and Frankfort 479, in all 25,910. The tenth rich Spaniards of Peru are shipping off their corps is to be made up in the following pro- effects, and many were embarking from portions: Hanover 13,054, Holstein 3,600, Panama. It is understood that the patriots Brunswick 2,096, Mecklenburg Schwerin will strike at Lima, at once, as soon as they 3,580, Mecklenburg Strelitz 718, Olden- can get ready for the great enterprise, in burg 2,178, Waldeck 519, Shaumburg Lippe which they have every prospect of being 240), Lippe Depnold 691, Lubec 407, Bremen successful. 485, Hamburg 1,298, in all 28,866. The The following ports remained in posseswhole army is thus to consist of 300,943 sion of the royalists on the 1st of November,

viz. Barcelona, Cumana, Valencia, Vittoria,

Caraccas, Laguira, Porto Cavello. All the Mr. Alexander Humboldt having express- ports to the eastward of Cumana, were held ed a disposition to visit India, and the In- by the patriots. dian Archipelago, the king of Prussia has Accounts were received at Coquimbo, placed at bis disposition about 14,000l. ster- that on the 6th September, the royalists had ling, to enable him to accomplish his object. evacuated Conception, after blowing up the

SPANISH AMERICA.

men.

PRUSSIA.

WEST-INDIES.

PROCEEDINGS OF CONGRESS.

NORTH AMERICA.

UNITED STATES.

fortifications, &c. An illumination took of South-Carolina; John Oliver, George place on the occasion. The expedition that Williams, George Hoffman, of Baltimore; had been fitted out at Valparaiso against and Archibald Gracie, of New-York. Conception, had, in consequence, turned William Jones has been unanimously retheir attention to Lima, with redoubled elected president. vigour, and intended shortly sailing.

Since the report of the committee, Mr.

Jones has resigned. From the beginning of January, 1818, to the latter end of September last, there were

Senale. exported from Havana 182,334 boxes of

Thursday, Dec. 24h. Mr. Sanford presented clayed sugars, and 532,550 arobes of coffee. the memorial of the New-York Society for

proAnd imported in the whole year of 1817, moting the manınıission of slaves, anti protect24,124 negro slaves.

ing such of them as have been or may be liberated; which was read and referred to a committee on the subject of slaves.

The bill making appropriations for the supCanada,

port of the navy, for 1319, and the bill for the The Montreal Herald says that Rouse's relief of Renner and Heath, were read a scPoint, on Lake Champlain, the key of that cond time and committed. lake, the place at which we have erected a The Senate adjourned to Monday. great fort, is found to be on the Canada side Monday, Dec. 28/h. The Senate was emof line 45, as laid down by the commission- ployed in the consideration of executive busiers appointed for that purpose.

ness, with closed doors. We understand that the line has not been

Tuesday, Dec. 291h. The same as yester

dav. run yet.

Wednesday, Dec. 30th. The Senate resumed

the consideration of the following resolution, A statement of loans made in different offered by Mr. Roberts on the 20th inst, and

agreed thereto: places by the Bank of the United States,

Resolved, That the committee on naval affairs since its establishment, according to an be, and they are hereby instructed to inquire official account rendered by the President whether the rules, regulations, and instructions and Directors to the Secretary of the for the naval service of the United States, comTreasury :

municated to the Senate by the message of the At Philadelphia, $8,834,089 62 President, of the 20th April last, are conformaPortsmouth,

232,962 48

ble to the provisions of the act, entitled “ An

act to alter and amend the several acts for esBoston,

410,257

tablishing a Navy Department,” by adding Providence, 471,683 46

thereto a Board of Navy Commissioners; and Middletown, 384,118 34

whether or not they inconveniently interfere New-York, 1,913,884 35

with other acts of Congress, relating to the Baltimore, 8,482,379 77 naval establishment, and how far they may apWashington, 1,505,963 75 pear to be expedient; and also whether any, Richmond, 2,608,170 93 and, if any, what legislative provision may be Norfolk,

1,286,673 23 necessary to give them the force and effect of Fayetteville, 623,379 70

law.
Charleston, 2,681,709 33 The Senate then proceeded to the considera- .
Savannah,

tion of executive business.
1,083,247 04
Lexington, 1,656,247 41

Thursday, Dec. 31st. The death of a mem

ber of the other House being announced, the Louisville, 1,034,513 18

Senate adjourned till Monday next.
Chilicothe,
631,211 99

Monday, Jan. 4!h. The following message
Cincinnati, 1,863,529 63

was received from the President of the United New-Orleans, 2,000,054 37

States, by Mr. J. J. Monroe, his private secrePittsburgh, 1,008,254 50

tary. The total amount of notes issued by the

To the Senate of the United States. Bank and its branches, has been $19,854,881, I lay before the Senate a report from the and the amount of said notes now on hand Secreiary of State, accompanied with a copy at the Bank and its branches,is $11,184,189. of a letter from Governor Rabun, which was

not cominunicated on a former occasion from So that there remain in circulation notes to

that department. the amount of $8,670,692 only.

JAMES MONROE. The following persons were, on the 4th

Jan. 4, 1819. of January, appointed by the stockholders The message and accompanying documents to be Directors of the Bank of the United

were read, and four hundred copies thereof or

dered 10 be printed. States for the ensuing year:-William Jones,

Mr. Mercer submitted the following resolu. James C. Fisher, John Sergeant; John Bol

tions, which were agreed to: ton, of 'Savannah ; Joshua Lippincott, John Coulter, John Lisle, John Connell, Daniel directed to report to this house a copy of such

Resolved, That the Secretary of the Navy be Lammot, Gustavus Calhoun, Charles Chaun- instructions, if any, as may have been issued cey, Joseph Dugan, James Schott, Henry by his department, in pursuance of the act of Toland ; 'Langdon Cheves, John Potter, Con; ress of 1807, prohibiting the iinportation

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of slaves, to the commanders of the armed ves- Mr. Morrow, from the committee on the pubsels of the United States, for the purpose of in- lic lands, reported a bill providing for a grant tercepting, on the coast of Africa, or elsewhere, of land for the seat of government of the state such vessels as have been engaged in the slave of Mississippi, and for the support of a semitrade.

nary of learning within the said state, which Resolved, That the Secretary of the Treasury was read. be directed to report to this house the number Wednesday, Jan. 13th. The bill to suspend, and names of the slave ships, if any, which for a further limited time, the sale or forfeiture have been seized and condemned, within the of lands, for failure in making the payments, United States, for violation of the laws thereof was read the third time, passed, and sent to against the importation of slaves, and if any the other House for concurrence. negroes, mulattoes, or persons of colour, have The President communicated to the Senate been found on board such vessels, their number, a letter from the Secretary of War, transmit. and the disposition which has been made of ting the annual statement of the expenditure and them by the several state governments under application of moneys drawn from the treasury, whose jurisdiction they have fallen.

by the Secretary of War, for the military estab. Tuesday, Jan. 5th. Mr. Sanford, from the lishment, during the last fiscal year. committee of commerce and manufactures, to The Senate then resumed the consideration whom was referred the memorial of the Gov. of the joint resolution proposing an amendnient errors of the New-York Hospital, reported a to the Constitution, so as to produce an uniform bill " 'to provide for the relief of sick and dis- mode (by districts), throughout the several abled seamen," which was read.

states, of electing electors of President and Wednesday, Jan. 6th. The bills more effec- Vice President of the United States, and Retually to provide for the punishment of certain presentatives to Congress, which was ordered crimes against the United States, were reported to be engrossed for a third reading. by Mr. Burrill, from the judiciary coinmittee, Thursday, Jan. 14th. Mr. Forsyth offered the former with, the latter without amendments. for consideration the following resolution :

Thursday, Jan. 7th. The bills to incorporate Resolved, That the judiciary committee be inthe Medical Society and Provident Association; structed to inquire into the expediency of prethe bill authorizing the Corporation of Wash- scribing, by law, the mode of quartering soldiers, ington to make certain streets; and the Rocky- during war, in the houses of citizens, when the ville Road bill, were severally read a second public exigencies may make it necessary, and time, and referred to the committee on the Dis- the mode by which private property may be trict of Columbia.

taken for public use, designating particularly The bill to extend the jurisdiction of the by whose orders property may be taken, the courts of the United States to cases arising out manner of ascertaining its value, and the mode of the law of patents, was read a second time. by which the owner shall receive, with the least

Friday, Jan. 8th. Mr. Johnson, from the possible delay, the just compensation for the coinmittee on the public lands, reported a bill same, to which he is entitled by the Constitufor adjusting the claims to land, and for estab- tion of the United States. lishing land offices in the districts east of the The bill concerning the organization of the island of Orleans, which was read.

courts of the United States, for the establishing Mr. Goldsborough, agreeably to notice, ob- of a district supreme court, and the appointtained leave and introduced a bill to amend the ment of new circuit judges; ordered to a third charter of the City of Washington ; which was reading. read.

Friday, Jan. 15th. Mr. Goldsborough, from Monday, Jan. 11th. The bill prescribing the the committee on the subject, reported'a bill mode of commencing, prosecuting, and de- respecting the erection of an equestrian statue ciding controversies between two or more states, in honour of the memory of Gen. Washington. was, on motion of Mr. Crittenden, recommit- Monday, Jan. 18th. The bill providing for ted to the committee that reported it: and the more convenient organization of the courts

Mr. Otis submitted the following motion for of the United States, was passed and sent to consideration :

the House for concurrence. Resolved, That the President of the United Tuesday, Jan. 19th. Nothing important was States be requested to communicate to the Se- done to-day. nate any information his possession, and Wednesday, Jan. 20th. No business of imwhich, in his opinion, the public interest may portance was transacted to-day. permit to be disclosed, relating to the seizure Thursday, Jan. 21st. · Mr. Williams, of and detention of the property of American citi- Tennessee, from the committee on military zens by the government of the island of Hayti, affairs, reported a bill for the better organizaand the statement of any negotiation, or at- tion of the military academy, which was read. tempts at negotiation, to procure restitution. The Senate then proceeded to the considera

Tuesday, Jan. 12th. Mr. Burrill, from the tion of executive business. committee on the judiciary, to whom was re- Friday, Jan. 22d. Mr.:Tait, from the comcommitted the bill prescribing the mode of com- mittee on naval affairs, reported the bill makmencing, prosecuting, and deciding controver- ing appropriations for the support of the navy sies between two or more states, reported the for the year 1819, with sone amendments; same with an amendment, not affecting the which were read. principle of the bill

Mr. Stokes, from the committee on the post The engrossed bill to enable the people of the office and post roads, reported a bill to repeal Alabama territory to form a state government, that part of the act of 1813, regulating the postand for the admission of such state into the office establishment, which provides that" Union, on an equal footing with the original tracts shall secure the regular transportation of states, was read the third time, passed, and the mail throughout each year;" which was sent to the other House for concurrence.

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