Shipwrecks and tales of the sea [signed W. and R.C.].

Portada
 

Comentarios de la gente - Escribir un comentario

No encontramos ningún comentario en los lugares habituales.

Páginas seleccionadas

Otras ediciones - Ver todas

Términos y frases comunes

Pasajes populares

Página 114 - But where, thought I, is the crew? Their struggle has long been over; — they have gone down amidst the roar of the tempest ; — their bones lie whitening in the caverns of the deep. Silence — oblivion, — like the waves, have closed over them ; and no one can tell the story of their end.
Página 115 - What sighs have been wafted after that ship ! what prayers offered up at the deserted fireside of home ! How often has the mistress, the wife, the mother, pored over the daily news, to catch some casual intelligence of this rover of the deep ! How has expectation darkened into anxiety — anxiety into dread — and dread into despair ! Alas! not one memento shall ever return for love to cherish. All that shall ever be known, is that she sailed from her port, " and was never heard of more ! " The...
Página 113 - There is no gradual transition, by which, as in Europe, the features and population of one country blend almost imperceptibly with those of another. From the moment you lose sight of the land you have left, all is vacancy until you step on the opposite shore, and are launched at once into the bustle and novelties of another world.
Página 118 - ... countenance. She seemed disappointed and agitated, when I heard a faint voice call her name. It was from a poor sailor, who had been ill all the voyage, and had excited the ,sympathy of every one on board. When the weather was fine, his messmates had spread a mattress for him on deck in the shade; but of late his illness had so increased, that he had taken to his hammock, and only breathed a wish that he might see his wife before he died. He had been helped on deck as we came up the river, and...
Página 112 - To an American visiting Europe, the long voyage he has to make is an excellent preparative. The temporary absence of worldly scenes and employments produces a state of mind peculiarly fitted to receive new and vivid impressions.
Página 115 - As we sat round the dull light of a lamp in the cabin, that made the gloom more ghastly, every one had his tale of shipwreck and disaster. I was particularly struck with a short one related by the captain. "As I was once sailing...
Página 117 - None but those who have experienced it, can form an idea of the delicious throng of sensations which rush into an American's bosom, when he first comes in sight of Europe. There is a volume of associations with the very name.
Página 114 - ... regions of the north all the luxuries of the south ; has diffused the light of knowledge and the charities of cultivated life ; and has thus bound together those scattered portions of the human race, between which nature seemed to have thrown an insurmountable barrier. We one day descried some shapeless object drifting at a distance. At sea, every thing that breaks the monotony of the surrounding expanse attracts attention. It proved to...
Página 117 - I saw the mouldering ruin of an abbey overrun with ivy, and the taper spire of a village church rising from the brow of a neighboring hill — all were characteristic of England.
Página 114 - What a glorious monument of human invention, that has thus triumphed over wind and wave ; has brought the ends of the world into communion ; has established an +interchange of blessings, pouring into the +sterile regions of the north all the luxuries of the south ; has diffused the light of knowledge and the charities of cultivated life; and has thus bound together those scattered portions of the human race, between which nature seemed to have thrown an "'"insurmountable "'"barrier. 7. We one day...

Información bibliográfica