Graduated exercises for translation into German, extr. from Engl. authors arranged, with an appendix, by F.O. Froembling

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Friedrich Otto Froembling
1866
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Contenido

The ant DARWIN
62
Liberty and slavery STERNE
64
Jamaica TROLLOPE
66
Envy JOHNSON
68
Lassoing the buffalo MCann
70
Character of William of Orange BURNET
72
Turning the grindstone FRANKLIN
75
Advantages of discussion Mill
76
On Wages WHATELY
78
The character of Cato MIDDLETON
82
Origin of the white the red and the black men W IRVING
83
With brains Sir BROWN
85
Adventure of Jones with a Highwayman FIELDING
86
这是美
89
The battle of the Nile WARBURTON
91
A state dificulty DE QUINCEY
94
The death of Queen Elizabeth HUME
95
Shakspeare and Ben Jonson DRYDEN
97
Industry and application BLAIR
99
SOINS
100
The Character of Alexander Pope CHESTERFIELD
102
The Hebrew Race B DISRAELI
103
TORTE
106
View of Mexico from the summit of Ahuatco PRESCOTT
108
Go thou and do likewise JEREMY TAYLOR
109
The committal of the seven bishops to the Tower MACAULAY
110
Fortune not to be trusted BOLINGBROKE
112
The works of creation ADDISON
113
ܐܶܬ݁ ܣܳܛܳ ܝܺ VERISUN
115
The great earthquake of Lisbon
116
LYELL
117
The Browns Tom Browns School
118
Wat Tyler DICKENS
119
Death of two lovers by lightning Pope
123
Life of Gustavus Adolphus King
125
Character of Rousseau BURKE
127
Discovery of the holy lance at Antioch GIBBON
129
Discovery of a colossal sculpture
131
Effects of the death of Nelson SOUTHEY
133
Houses and furniture of the nobles in the middle ages HALLAM
134
Miltons personal appearance
137
The Czar Peter in England
138
BURNET
140
From a Moorish legend
141
Counsel to young ladies MRS JAMESON
142
Impressions of the city of Madrid BORROW
144
The Lord helpeth man and beast COLERIDGE
146
The story of a disabled soldier GOLDSMITH
148
Love for the dead W IRVING
167
Description of the diversions
169
Accordance between the songs of birds and the different aspects of the day JENNER
171
Adventure with a lion LIVINGSTONE
173
The resignation of the Emperor Charles V ROBERTSON
174
Lord Chesterfield to his son CHESTERFIELD
182
Nelson and Hardy
197
On human grandeur
207
Personal traits of George II
214
Generał Wolfe to his army
220
On the value of works of fiction THACKERAY
226
The comparison of watches MARIA EDGEWORTH
233
Character of Falstaff HAZLITT
247
The young philosopher AIKIN
250
Machiavelli and Montesquieu MACAULAY
252
On tedious storytellers STEELE
254
Results of civilization ADAM SMITH
257
Refinement favourable to hap piness and virtue HUME
259
Necessity of precision in using language HOBBES
262
Arminius CREASY
264
Adaptation of the covering of birds to their condition PALEY
265
Woman in the Homeric age GLADSTONE
269
Battle of Dunbar CLARENDON
271
Labour and recreation 66 Friends in Council
273
Education of Martin Scriblerus POPE
274
Of suspicion BACON
276
Addison THACKERAY
277
The French revolutionary as sassins ALISON
280
The quack philosopher dis comfited DE QUINCEY
281
The quack philosopher dis
283
Behind time FREEMAN HUNT
284
Pioneers of science and literature LOCKE
286
Country hospitality Swift
287
The Rivals SHERIDAN
289
Poor relations LAMB
292
General view of the advantages and evils of the feudal system HALLAM
294
Praise and blame RUSKIN
297
Sir Roger de Coverley at church ADDISON
299
Visit to a model prison CARLYLE
300
An Irish postilion MARIA EDGEWORTH
304
Prejudices LOCKE
306
Right of resistance to govern ment MACKINTOSH
308
The state of man before the fall South
312
Fathers and elder sons among the great THACKERAY
314
Considerations of the vanity and JEREMY Taylor
318
JENNER
28
A fable
41

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Página 14 - Never, never more shall we behold that generous loyalty to rank and sex, that proud submission, that dignified obedience, that subordination of the heart, which kept alive, even in servitude itself, the spirit of an exalted freedom. The unbought grace of life, the cheap defence of nations, the nurse of manly sentiment and heroic enterprise, is gone...
Página 91 - The old man told him that he worshipped the fire only, and acknowledged no other god. At which answer Abraham grew so zealously angry, that he thrust the old man out of his tent, and exposed him to all the evils of the night, and an unguarded condition. When the old man was gone, God called to Abraham, and asked him where the stranger was : he replied, I thrust him away because he did not worship thee.
Página 14 - ... little did I dream that I should have lived to see such disasters fallen upon her in a nation of gallant men, in a nation of men of honor and of cavaliers. I thought ten thousand swords must have leaped from their scabbards to avenge even a look that threatened her with insult.
Página 198 - REVENGE is a kind of wild justice; which the more man's nature runs to, the more ought law to weed it out. For as for the first wrong, it doth but offend the law; but the revenge of that wrong putteth the law out of office.
Página 71 - I call upon the honor of your lordships to reverence the dignity of your ancestors and to maintain your own. I call upon the spirit and humanity of my country to vindicate the national character.
Página 79 - Catiline. But he has done his robberies so openly that one may see he fears not to be taxed by any law. He invades authors like a monarch; and what would be theft in other poets is only victory in him. With the spoils of these writers he so represents old Rome to us, in its rites, ceremonies, and customs, that if one of their poets had written either of his tragedies, we had seen less of it than in him.
Página 46 - Tis thou, thrice sweet and gracious goddess, addressing myself to LIBERTY, whom all in public or in private worship, whose taste is grateful, and ever will be so, till NATURE herself shall change no tint of words can spot thy snowy mantle or...
Página 199 - ... and it is two for one. Some, when they take revenge, are desirous the party should know whence it cometh: this is the more generous. For the delight seemeth to be not so much in doing the hurt as in making the party repent: but base and crafty cowards are like the arrow that flieth in the dark. Cosmus, duke of Florence, had a desperate saying against perfidious or neglecting friends, as if those wrongs were unpardonable: You shall read (saith he) that we are commanded to forgive our enemies;...
Página 199 - take good at God's hands, and not be content to take evil also ? " and so of friends in a proportion.
Página 47 - As I darkened the little light he had, he lifted up a hopeless eye towards the door, then cast it down. — shook his head, and went on with his work of affliction. I heard his chains upon his legs, as he turned his body to lay his little stick upon the bundle. He gave a deep sigh, — I saw the iron enter into his soul. I burst into tears, — I could not sustain the picture of confinement which my fancy had drawn.

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