Letters to a Young Student: In the First Stage of a Liberal Education

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Perkins & Marvin, 1832 - 174 páginas

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Página 66 - ... true eloquence I find to be none but the serious and hearty love of truth; and that whose mind soever is fully possessed with a fervent desire to know good things, and with the dearest charity to infuse the knowledge of them into others, when such a man would speak, his words, by what I can express, like so many nimble and airy servitors, trip about him at command, and in well-ordered files, as he would wish, fall aptly into their own places.
Página 106 - I do not know what I may appear to the world, but to myself I seem to have been only like a boy playing on the sea-shore, and diverting myself in now and then finding a smoother pebble or a prettier shell than ordinary, whilst the great ocean of truth lay all undiscovered before me.
Página 122 - Tis greatly wise to talk with our past hours ; And ask them, what report they bore to heaven : And how they might have borne more welcome news.
Página 13 - Can the Ethiopian change his skin, or the leopard his spots ? then may ye also do good, that are accustomed to do evil.
Página 94 - I HAVE often had occasion to observe, that a warm blundering man does more for the world than a frigid wise man. A man, who gets into a habit of inquiring about proprieties and expediencies and occasions, often spends his life without doing any thing to purpose.
Página xi - He that ruleth his spirit, is better than he that taketh a city,
Página 66 - Si vis me flere, dolendum est primum ipsi tibi; if you wish me to weep, you must yourself first weep.
Página 39 - It may be further observed, that if there be any thing that can be called genius in matters of mere judgment and reasoning, it seems to consist chiefly in being able to give that attention to the subject which keeps it steady in the mind, till we can survey it accurately on all sides.
Página 43 - I have never yet engaged in any exercise, which afforded more salutary discipline of this sort, than that of translating difficult passages from a foreign language. I have sometimes spent whole hours, on even a preposition or an adverb ; but I am very certain, that few of my hours have been spent to better purpose, in their influence over the habits of the mind.
Página 66 - I find to be none, but the serious and hearty love of truth ; and that, whose mind soever is fully possessed with a fervent desire to know good things, and with the dearest charity to infuse the knowledge of them into others, WHEN SUCH A MAN WOULD SPEAK, his words, like so many nimble and airy servitors, trip about him at command, and in well ordered files, as he would wish, fall abruptly into their own places.

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