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line ridicules the affectation of beginning many words with the same letter. He might have remarked the same of

The raging rocks

And shivering shocks. Gascoigne, contemporary with our poet, remarks and blames the same affectation,

JOHNSON. This alliteration seems to have reached the height of its fashion in the reign of Hen. VIII. The following stanza is quoted from a poem On the Fall and evil Success of Rebellion, written in 1537, by Wilfride Holme. “Loe, leprous burdeins, lubricke in loquacitie,

Vah, vaporous villeins, with venim vulnerate, Proh, prating parenticides, plexious to pinnositie, *** Fie, frantike fabulators, furibund, and fatuate, “Out oblatrant, oblict, obstacle, and obecate, Ab addict algors, in acerbitie acclamant, “ Magnate in mischief, malicious to mugilate,

Repriving your Roy so renowned and radiant." In Tasser's Husbandry, page 104, there is a poem of which every word begins with a T.

I have heard of a Latin poem, Pugna Porcorum, in which every word begins with a P.

66 And like Limander, &c.] Limander and Helen, are spoken by the blundering Player for Leander and Hero. Shafalus and Procrus for Cephalus and Procris.

JOHNSON. 7-in snuff.] Anequivocation. Snuff signifies both the cinder of a candle, and hasty anger. Johnson.

STEEVENS,

68 and prove an ass.

.] The character of The-' seus in this play is more exalted in his humanity, than in his greatness. Though some sensible observations on life, and animated descriptions fall from him, as it is said of Iago, you should taste him more as a soldier than as a wit, which is a distinction he is here striving to deserve, though with little success; as in support of his pretensions he never rises higher than a pun, and frequently sinks as low as a quibble.

STEEVENS. 69 A Bergomask dance,] is, (as Sir T. H observes in his Glossary), a dance after the manner of the peasants of Bergomasco, a country in Italy, belonging to the Venetians. All the buffoons in Italy affect to imitate the ridiculous jargon of that people, and from thence it became a custom to imitate their manner of dancing.

o-foredone.) i. e. overcome.

STEEVENS,

70

LOVE'S LABOUR’S LOST.

BY

WILLIAM SHAKSPEARE.

REM A RKS

ON THE

PLOT, THE FABLE, AND CONSTRUCTION

OP

LOVE'S LABOUR'S LOST.

STEEVENS.

I have not been hitherto so lucky as to discover any novel on which this comedy seems to have been founded, and yet the story of it has most of the features of an ancient romance.

In this play, which all the editors have concurred to censure, and some have rejected as unworthy of our poet, it must be confessed that there are many passages mean, childish, and vulgar; and some which ought not to have been exhibited, as we are told they were, to a maiden queen. But there are scattered through the whole many sparks of genius; nor is there any play that has more evident marks of the hand of Shakspeare.

JOHNSON,

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