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thorough knowledge of their re- vinced, as was also his father, who spective languages. For a com. frequently, during his reign, 'ex. plete and most satisfactory proof pressed his regret to Mr, A. Lay. and illustration of this position, we ton, that no Eoglish consul could most refer our readers to Mr. be found capable of holding direct Jackson's cleventh chapter, from intercourse with bim.” which we are constrained, by our limits, to make no other than the following extracts:

" In a conversation teith the « When we recollect that the minister at Marocco for European envoys to Marocco for the last affairs, his excellency asked me if, centory have been men almost in the event of his master's writing wholly unacquainted with the to his majesty, the latter would be manners, customs, and religious able to get the letter interpreted ; prejudices of the people, and ig. I answered in the affirmative ; and norant of their language, we shall a very polite and friendly letter cease to be surprised that our eon. was afterwards written," which 10. nection with that empire has been quested an answer ; but it remainso limited, and impeded by mutual ed here in the secretary of state's misunderstanding of each other's office, without any attention being sentiments, originating, but too of. paid to its contents; a mark of dis. ten, in deficiency and inaccuracy respect which gave great offence of interpreters. What expecta. to the emperor. tions can be indulged of terminat. " It appears to me extraordi. ing successfully negociations with nary, that a language which is a prince, in conversing with whom spoken over a much greater extent some ignorant and illiterate inter. of country than any other on earth preter, generally a Jew, and a de. -a language combining all the voted subject of the emperor, must powers and energy of the Greek be made the confidential servant of and Latin, should be so little uit. the party treating? Besides, every derstood, that an Arabic letter, one acquainted with the nature of written by the present Emperor the goveroment,and political princi. of Marocco to the King of Great ples of the court of Marocco, is well Britain, actually lay in the secrea' aware, that, even supposing it pos- tary of state's office some months sible to procure a Jew, capable of without being translated. The interpreting accurately the English circumstance coming to the know into Arabic, and vice versa, yet there fedge of the chancellor of the exare many expressions necessary for chequer (the right honourable an envoy to use to the emperor, Spencer Perceval) that gentleinant which no Jew in the country dare expressed a wish to a friend of to utter on pain of losing his head; mine, to have a translation, and the general garrulity of these peo the letter was transmitted to me for ple, moreover, 'is such, that they that purpose." Doctor Buffe, wba are perhaps unworthy of being in. delivered it, assured me, it bad trusted with any secret wherein tbe been sent to one, if not both unis interest of a nation is concerned. versities, and to the post-office, but Of this the emperor himself is con. that, either from difference in the

30.4 232. no pudotdatida punctuation of the characters, or men, buides those on the foundain the language itself, no one could tion, might be attracted to the be found capable of rendering it college of Malta, so finely situated into - English. This statement, for such a rendezvous, and the ac. however unaccountable it may ape" quisition of the living languages pear to many, was afterwards fars facilitated by social converse among ther confirmed, by passports and ingenious youths of different na.. other papers in African Arabic be- tions. If this project of a college ing sent to me for translations, the at Malta should come under the want of which had detained vessels eye, and meet with the approbation in our ports, and caused merchants of Mr. Jackson, it would be well in London to suffer from a loss of if he would take it up. There is markets."

no one we know of, better quali. An academy of commerce was fied to point out its advantages, instituted by the emperor Joseph and the arrangements proper for II. at Vienna ; at which academy carrying it into

execution. the pupils were instructed in a va. riety of foreign languages, and in the art of drawing. Such an aca. State of the Forcign Afairs of demy might be founded by the

Great Britain for the Year British government, without im. 1809. By Gould Francis posing any burthen on the public, Leckie, Esq. at Malta. The whole property in this island, formerly belonging to THE grand political measure of the Knights of St. John, has de. opposing a kind of maritime em. volved to the crown of Great Bric. pire to the overgrown, and still tain. This property might be growing empire, of France, on the converted into a fond for the sup- continent of Europe, touched on: port of proper masters, who could in our last article, is so ingeniously be procured from the islansls and and ably recommended to the coasts of the Mediterranean, and a British government in the writings certain number of scholars. In. of Mr. Leckie, that we do not ho ths seminary young men might be sitate to give this small pamphlet a trained up to act in the capacities place among the books we have se. of consuls, commercialinterpreters, lected as favourable specimens of and agents, and as travellers under 1809. It exhibits a happy and the patronage of literary and libe. rare ndion of patriotism, learning, ral individuals or societies, for the genius, comprehensive views, and exploration of unknown regions, solid sense.* The spirit and ten. and the improvement of both natu. dency of the pamphlet is briefly rai and civil history. From the stated in the conclusion : isla::ds and the countries on the " From all that we have hitherto Mediterranean, as well as from experienced of the views of Bona. Great Britain and Ireland, young parte, from his undertaking and

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* See also our account of his “ Ilistorical Survey of the Foreign Affairs of Great Britain, with a View to explain the Causes o the Disasters et the late and present Wars,” in our Account 04 Buuks, Yol. L p. 267.

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General Instructions to Sir John Moore, before he set out on his March

to Spain.-Plan of Leading a British Army into the Heart of Spain
-By whom formed.The British Ministry deplorably ignorant both of
the French Force in Spain, and the real State of that Country. The
French concentrated behind the Ebro.The whole of their Force in
Cantonments and Garrisons.-Exaggerated Accounts of the Enthusiasm

of the Spaniards.-Fond Credulity of the British Ministry on that Sub-
ject, and, in Consequence of this, the most romantic

projects. The

flatter-
ing Expectations of Co-operation held out to Sir John Moore utterly dis-
appointed. - Central Junta of Spain. - Their Character, incredible
Weakness and FollyTraitors among them.-False Intelligence of
the Approach of the French in great Force to Salamanca.-Measures
announced by Sir John Moore under the Impression of this to the Junta
of that place.- Amazing Apathy and Indifference to Public Affairs
and the Fate of the Country.- Tardy and

deficient Supplies to our
Army. The Situation of Sir David Baird, who had landed in Gal.
licia, materially affected by the Defeat of the Spanish army of the North.
-Design of Sir John Moore to take a Line of Positions on the
Duero-Frustrated by the total Defeat of General Castanos-By this
the British General determined to retreat on Lisbon This Plan of
Retreating abandoned, and why-False and treacherous Intelligence
transmitted by the Civil and Military Junta of Madrid to the Com-
mander of the British Army-Warmly seconded and supported by
Dispatches from Mr. Frêre-Strange Infatuation, as well as Arro-
gance and Presumption, of that Minister-Means by which the false
Intelligence was happily counteracted. The Force brought against

Spain by Buonaparte after the Conference of Erfurth. The bold
- Measures adopted by the British Commander for the Extrication

of

nor

and pursuing other partial objects have no alternative but to increase
which do not for a moment arrest our own empire, or become a part
the progress of the enemy, of that of France.”
increase our own strength, is wast. If we could yield to our inclina.
ing our time and resouroes in a fe. tion, we would present to our read.
verish attempt to put off the day ers the whole of this little treatise,
of our destruction a little longer. without dread of being called to
Unless we become ambitious like account by Mr. Leckie, whose
our enemy, unless we follow the yiews appear to be merely patrio.
maxims we have so much enlarged tic, for invading his literary pro-
upon, we must finally submit. We perty.

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General Instructions to Sir John Moore, before he set out on his March

to Spain.-Plan of Leading a British Army into the Heart of Spain

-By whom formed.- The British Ministry deplorably ignorant both of

the French Force in Spain, and the real State of that Country. The

French concentrated behind the Ebro.The whole of their Force in

Cantonments and Garrisons--Exaggerated Accounts of the Enthusiasm

of the Spaniards.--Fond Credulity of the British Ministry on that Sub-

ject, and, in Consequence of this, the most romantic projects. The flatter-

ing Expectations of Co-operation held out to Sir John Moore utterly diso

appointed. - Central Junta of Spain. - Their Character, incredible

Weakness and Folly— Traitors among them.-False Intelligence of

the Approach of the French in great Force to Salamanca.-Measures

announced by Sir John Moore under the Impression of this to the Junta

of that place.-- Amazing Apathy and Indifference to Public Affairs

and the Fate of the Country.Tardy and deficient Supplies to our

Army. The Situation of Sir David Baird, who had landed in Gal.

licia, materially affected by the Defeat of the Spanish army of the North.

-Design of Sir John Moore to take a Line of Positions on the

Duero-Frustrated by the total Defeat of General Castanos-By this

the British General determined to retreat on Lisbon This Plan of

Retreating abandoned, and why-False and treacherous Intelligence

transmitted by the Civil and Military Junta of Madrid to the Com-

mander of the British Army-Warmly seconded and supported by

Dispatches from Mr. Frère-Strange Infatuation, as well as Arro-

gance and Presumption, of that Minister-Means by which the false

Intelligence was happily counteracted. The Force brought against

Spain by Buonaparte after the Conference of Erfurth. The bold

Measures adopted by the British Commander for the Extrication

of

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