Shakespeare and His Times: Including the Biography of the Poet; Criticism on His Genius and Writings; a New Chronology of His Plays; a Disquisition on the Object of His Sonnets; and a History of the Manners, Customs, Amusement, Superstitions, Poetry, and Elegant Literature of His Age, Volumen1

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T. Cadell and W. Davies, 1817
 

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Página 347 - A strange fish! Were I in England now, as once I was, and had but this fish painted, not a holiday fool there but would give a piece of silver. There would this monster make a man. Any strange beast there makes a man. When they will not give a doit to relieve a lame beggar, they will lay out ten to see a dead Indian. Legg'd like a man! and his fins like arms! Warm, o
Página 363 - Cours'd one another down his innocent nose In piteous chase ; and thus the hairy fool, Much marked of the melancholy Jaques, Stood on the extremest verge of the swift brook, Augmenting it with tears. Duke S, But what said Jaques ? Did he not moralize this spectacle ? First Lord. O, yes, into a thousand similes. First, for his weeping into the needless stream ;
Página 356 - Call for the robin redbreast and the wren, Since o'er shady groves they hover, And with leaves and flowers do cover The friendless bodies of unburied men. Call unto his funeral dole The ant, the field-mouse, and the mole, To rear him hillocks that shall keep him warm, And (when gay tombs are robbed) sustain no harm : But keep the wolf far thence, that's foe to men, For with his nails he'll dig them up again.
Página 137 - There's not a budding boy or girl this day, But is got up, and gone to bring in may. A deal of youth, ere this, is come Back, and with white-thorn laden home.
Página 368 - For this he was prosecuted by that gentleman, as he thought, somewhat too severely ; and in order to revenge that ill usage, he made a ballad upon him. And though this, probably the first essay of his poetry, be lost, yet it is said to have been so very bitter, that it redoubled the prosecution against him to that degree, that he was obliged to leave his business and family in Warwickshire, for some time, and shelter himself in London.
Página 317 - The night has been unruly : where we lay, Our chimneys were blown down : and, as they say, Lamentings heard i...
Página 305 - ... praise his works behold Both day and night: How often from the steep Of echoing hill or thicket have we heard Celestial voices to the midnight air, Sole, or responsive each to other's note, Singing their great Creator? oft in bands While they keep watch, or nightly rounding walk, With heavenly touch of instrumental sounds In full harmonic number join'd, their songs Divide the night, and lift our thoughts to Heaven.
Página 339 - I am thy father's spirit; Doom'd for a certain term to walk the night, And for the day confined to fast in fires, Till the foul crimes done in my days of nature Are burnt and purged away.
Página 187 - Perfume for a lady's chamber ; Golden quoifs and stomachers, For my lads to give their dears ; Pins and poking-sticks of steel, What maids lack from head to heel : Come buy of me, come ; come buy, come buy ; Buy, lads, or else your lasses cry Come buy.
Página 341 - Are brought ; and feel by turns the bitter change Of fierce extremes, — extremes by change more fierce, From beds of raging fire to starve in ice Their soft ethereal warmth, and there to pine Immoveable, infix'd, and frozen round, Periods of time, — thence hurried back to fire.

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