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him as unto God the Father; ' blessing, and honour, and glory, and power, be unto him that sitteth upon the throne, and unto the Lamb for ever and ever.'

[3dly.] The nature of this adoration is described to consist in three things. lst. Solemn prostration. And the four living creatures said, Amen. And the four-and-twenty elders fell down and worshipped him that liveth for ever and ever.' So also is it described, chap. iv. 10, 11. 2dly. In the ascription of all divine honour and glory, as is at large expressed, ver. 11-13. 3. In the way of expressing the design of their souls in this adoration, which is by the praises ; “they sung a new song;' that is, of praise, for so are all those psalms which have that title of a new song. And in these things, namely, solemn prostration of soul in the acknowledgment of divine excellencies, ascriptions of glory and honour with praise, doth religious adoration consist. And they belong not unto the great holy society of them who worship above and here below; whose hearts are not always ready unto this solemn adoration of the Lamb, and who are not on all occasions exercised therein.

And this adoration of Christ doth differ from the adoration of God absolutely considered, and of God as the Father, not in its nature, but merely on the account of its especial motives. The principal motive unto the adoration of God absolutely considered, is the work of creation, the manifestation of his glory therein, with all the effects of his power and goodness thereon ensuing. So it is declared, Rev. iv. 8–11. Thou art worthy, O Lord, to receive glory, and honour, and power, for thou hast created all things, and for thy pleasure they are and were created.' And the principal motive unto the adoration and worship of God as the Father, is that eternal love, grace, and goodness, which he is the fountain of in a peculiar manner; Eph. i. 4, 5. But the great motive unto the adoration of Christ is the work of redemption ; Rev. v. 12. 'Worthy is the Lamb that was slain to receive power, and riches, and wisdom, and strength, and honour, and glory, and blessing.' The reason whereof is given, ver. 9, 10. For thou wast slain, and hast redeemed us unto God by thy blood, and hast made us unto our God kings and priests.' The adoration is the same, ver. 13. • Blessing, and honotır, and glory, and power, be unto him that sitteth upon

the throne, and unto the Lamb for ever and ever. But the immediate motives of it are different, as its objects are distinct.

Herein no small part of the life of Christian religion doth consist. The humbling of our souls before the Lord Christ from an apprehension of his divine excellencies, the ascription of glory, honour, praise, with thanksgiving unto him, on the great motive of the work of redemption, with the blessed effects thereof, are things wherein the life of faith is continually exercised. Nor can we have any evidence of an interest in that blessedness which consists in the eternal assignation of all glory and praise unto him in heaven, if we are not exercised unto this worship of him, here on earth.

2dly. Invocation is the second general branch of divine honour; of that honour which is due and paid unto the Son, as unto the Father. This is the first exercise of divine faith, the breath of the spiritual life. And it consisteth in two things, or háth two parts. (1st.) An ascription of all divine properties and excellencies unto him whom we invocate. This is essential unto prayer, which without it is but vain babbling. Whoever cometh unto God hereby, 'must believe that he is, and that he is the rewarder of them that diligently seek him.' (2dly.) There is in it also a representation of our wills, affections, and desires of our souls, unto him on whom we call, with an expectation of being heard and relieved, by virtue of his infinitely divine excellencies. This is the proper acting of faith with respect unto ourselves; and hereby it is our duty to give honour unto the person of Christ.

When he himself died in the flesh, he committed his departing soul by solemn invocation into the hands of his Father, Psal. xxxi. 5. Luke xxiii. 4. ' Father, into thy hands I commit my spirit.' And to evidence that it is the will of God, that we should honour the Son, as we honour the Father, even as the Son himself in his human nature, who is our example, honoured the Father. He who first died in the faith of the gospel, bequeathed his departing soul into the hands of Jesus Christ by solemn invocation; Acts vii. 59. 'They stoned Stephen, étikadoúpevov, solemnly invocating, and saying, Lord Jesus, receive my spirit.' And having by faith and prayer, left his own soul safe in the hand of the Lord Jesus, he adds one petition more unto him, wherewith he died, 'Lord, lay not this sin to their charge ;'

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ver. 60. Herein did he give divine honour unto Christ in the especial invocation of his name, in the highest instances that can be conceived. In his first request wherein he committed his departing soul into his hands, he ascribed unto him divine omniscience, omnipresence, love, and power. And in the latter for his enemies, divine authority and mercy to be exercised in the pardon of sin. In his example is the rule established, for the especial invocation of Christ for the effects of divine power and mercy.

Hence the apostle describeth the church or believers, and distinguisheth it, or them, from all others, by the discharge of this duty; 1 Cor. i. 2. With all that call on the name of our Lord Jesus Christ, both their Lord and ours.' To call on the name of the Lord Jesus expresseth solemn invocation in the way of religious worship. The Jews did call on the name of God. All others in their

way the names of their gods. This is that whereby the church is distinguished from them all ; it calls on the name of our Lord Jesus Christ.

He requires that as we believe on God, that is, the Father, so we should believe on him also, and therein honour the Son, as we honour the Father; John xiv. 1. The nature of this faith, and the manner how it is exercised on Christ, we shall declare afterward. But the apostle treating of the nature and efficacy of this invocation, affirms, that we cannot call on him in whom we have not believed ;' Rom. x. 14. Whence it follows on the contrary, that he on whom we are bound to believe, on him it is our duty to call. So the whole Scripture is closed with a prayer of the church unto the Lord Christ, expressing their faith in him ; . Even , come Lord Jesus ;' Rev. xxii. 20.

There is not any one reason of prayer, not any one moTee unto it, not any consideration of its use or efficacy, but Filter this peculiar invocation of Christ, a necessary duty. i things in general are required to render the duty of inna lawful and useful. First, that it have a proper ob

Svcondly, that it have prevalent motives and encou***unto it. These in concurrence are the formal

od ground of all religious worship in general, and

2:1 particular. So are they laid down as the founhi

+ a: religion ; Exod. xx. 2, 3. 'I am the Lord thy

God,' that is, the proper object of all religious worship; 'which brought thee out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of bondage;' which being summarily and typically representative of all divine benefits, temporal, spiritual, and eternal, is the great motive thereunto. The want of both these in all mere creatures, saints and angels, makes the invocation of them, not only useless, but idolatrous. But they both eminently concur in the person of Christ, and his actings towards us. All the perfections of the divine nature are in him, whence he is the proper object of religious invocation. On this account when he acted in and towards the church, as the great angel of the covenant, God instructed the people unto all religious observance of him, and obedience unto him; Exod. xxiii. 21. 'Beware of him and obey his voice, provoke him not, for he will not pardon your transgressions, for my name is in him.' Because the name of God was in him, that is, the divine nature, with sovereign authority to punish or pardon sin, therefore was all religious obedience due unto him. And no motives are wanting hereunto. All that the Lord Christ hath done for us, and all the principles of love, grace, compassion, and power, from whence what he hath so done did proceed, are all of this nature. And they are accompanied with the encouragement of his relation unto us, and charge concerning us. Take away this duty, and the peculiar advantage of Christian religion is destroyed.

We have lived to see the utmost extremes that Christian religion can divert into. Some, with all earnestness, do press the formal invocation of saints and angels as our duty. And some will not grant that it is lawful for us so to call on Christ himself.

The Socinians grant generally that it is lawful for us to call on Christ; but they deny that it is our duty at any time so to do. But as they own that it is not our duty, so on their principles it cannot be lawful. Denying his divine person, they leave him not the proper object of prayer. For prayer without an ascription of divine excellencies, as omniscience, omnipresence, and almighty power unto him whom we invocate, is but vain babbling, that hath nothing of the nature of true prayer in it. And to make such ver. 60. Herein did he give divine honour unto Christ in the especial invocation of his name, in the highest instances that can be conceived. In his first request wherein he committed his departing soul into his hands, he ascribed unto him divine omniscience, omnipresence, love, and power. And in the latter for his enemies, divine authority and mercy to be exercised in the pardon of sin. In his example is the rule established, for the especial invocation of Christ for the effects of divine power and mercy.

Hence the apostle describeth the church or believers, and distinguisheth it, or them, from all others, by the discharge of this duty; 1 Cor. i. 2. With all that call on the name of our Lord Jesus Christ, both their Lord and ours.' To call on the name of the Lord Jesus expresseth solemn invocation in the way of religious worship. The Jews did call on the name of God. All others in their way called on the names of their gods. This is that whereby the church is distinguished from them all ; it calls on the name of our Lord Jesus Christ.

He requires that as we believe on God, that is, the Father, so we should believe on him also, and therein honour the Son, as we honour the Father; John xiv. 1. The nature of this faith, and the manner how it is exercised on Christ, we shall declare afterward.' But the apostle treating of the nature and efficacy of this invocation, affirms, that we' cannot call on him in whom we have not believed ;' Rom. x. 14. Whence it follows on the contrary, that he on whom we are bound to believe, on him it is our duty to call. So the whole Scripture is closed with a prayer of the church unto the Lord Christ, expressing their faith in him ; • Even so, come Lord Jesus ;' Rev. xxii. 20.

There is not any one reason of prayer, not any one motive unto it, not any consideration of its use or efficacy, but render this peculiar invocation of Christ, a necessary duty. Two things in general are required to render the duty of invocation lawful and useful. First, that it have a proper object. Secondly, that it have prevalent motives and encouragements unto it. These in concurrence are the formal reason and ground of all religious worship in general, and of prayer in particular. So are they laid down as the foundation of all religion; Exod. xx. 2, 3. “I am the Lord thy

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