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another. That were not to honour the Son, kaows, 'as' we honour the Father, but in a way infinitely different from it.

[2.] In the same manner, with the same faith, love, reverence, and obedience, always, in all things, in all acts and duties of religion whatever.

This distinct honour is to be given unto the person of the Son by virtue of this command of the Father, though originally on the account of his oneness in nature with the Father. And our duty herein is pressed with the highest enforcement; he that honours not the Son, honours not the Father. He who denieth the Son'(herein) hath not the Father; but he that acknowledgeth the Son hath the Father also;' 1 John ii. 23. For this is the record, that God hath given unto us eternal life, and this life is in the Son. He that hath the Son, hath life, and he that hath not the Son hath not life;' chap. v. 11, 12. If we are wanting herein, whatever we pretend, we do not worship nor honour God at all.

And there is reason to give this caution; reason to fear that this great fundamental principle of our religion, is, if not disbelieved, yet not much attended unto in the world. Many who profess a respect unto the Divine Being, and the worship thereof, seem to have little regard unto the

person of the Son in all their religion. For although they may admit of a customary interposition of his name in their religious worship; yet the same distinct veneration of him as of the Father, they seem not to understand, or to be exercised in. How beit, all the acceptance of our persons and duties with God, depend on this one condition, that we honour the Son, even as we honour the Father.' To honour the Son as we ought to honour the Father, is that which makes us Christians, and which nothing else will so do.

This honour of the person of Christ may be considered in the duties of it, wherein it doth consist; and in the principle, life, or spring, of those duties.

The duties whereby we ascribe and express divine honour unto Christ, may be reduced unto two heads. 1st. Adoration. 2dly. Invocation.

Adoration is the prostration of soul before him as God, in the acknowledgment of his divine excellencies and the ascription of them unto him. It is expressed in the Old Tes

quickeneth them; even so the Son quickeneth whom he will. For the Father judgeth no man, but hath committed all judgment unto the Son. Not that these things are the forinal reason and cause of the divine honour which is to be given him; but they are reasons of it, and motives unto it, in that they are evidences of his being the Son of God.

But it may be said, What need is there that the Father should so interpose an act of his will and sovereign pleasure, as to this honouring of the Son, seeing the sole cause and reason of this divine honour is the divine nature, which the Son is no less partaker of than the Father? I answer,

(1.) He doth not in this command intend the honour and worship of Christ absolutely as God, but distinctly as the Son, which peculiar worship was not known under the Old Testament, but was now declared necessary in the committing all power, authority, and judgment unto him. This is the honour whereof we speak.

(2.) He doth it, lest any should conceive that as he was now sent of the Father,' and that in the form of a servant,' this honour should not be due unto him. And the world was then far from thinking that it was so; and many, I fear, are yet of the same mind.

He is, therefore, to be honoured by us, according to the will of God, kalws .in like manner,' as we honour the Father.

[1.] With the same honour; that is, divine, sacred, religious, and supreme. To honour the Father with other honour, is to dishonour him. When men design to give glory and honour to God which is not truly divine, it is idolatry. For this honour in truth is nothing but the ascription of all infinite divine excellencies unto him. Whereon when men ascribe unto him that which is not so, they fall into idolatry by the worship of their own imaginations. So was it with the Israelites when they thought to have given glory to God, by making a golden calf whereon they proclaimed a feast unto Jehovah; Exod. xxxii. 5. And so was it with the heathen in all their images of God, and the glory which they designed to give him thereby, as the apostle declares, Rom. i. 23. 25. This is one kind of idolatry, as the other is, the ascribing unto creatures any thing that is proper and peculiar unto God, any divine excellency. And we do not honour God the Father with one kind of honour, and the Son with

another. That were not to honour the Son, kalus, 'as' we honour the Father, but in a way infinitely different from it.

[2.] In the same manner, with the same faith, love, reverence, and obedience, always, in all things, in all acts and duties of religion whatever.

This distinct honour is to be given unto the person of the Son by virtue of this command of the Father, though originally on the account of his oneness in nature with the Father. And our duty herein is pressed with the highest enforcement; "he that honours not the Son, honours not the Father. He who denieth the Son'(herein) hath not the Fa. ther; but he that acknowledgeth the Son hath the Father also;' 1 John ii. 23. For this is the record, that God hath given unto us eternal life, and this life is in the Son. He that bath the Son, hath life, and he that hath not the Son hath not life;' chap. v. 11, 12. If we are wanting herein, whatever we pretend, we do not worship nor honour God at all.

And there is reason to give this caution; reason to fear that this great fundamental principle of our religion, is, if not disbelieved, yet not much attended unto in the world. Many who profess a respect unto the Divine Being, and the worship thereof, seem to have little regard unto the person of the Son in all their religion. For although they may admit of a customary interposition of his name in their religious worship; yet the same distinct veneration of him as of the Father, they seem not to understand, or to be exercised in. Howbeit, all the acceptance of our persons and duties with God, depend on this one condition, that we honour the Son, even as we honour the Father.' To honour the Son as we ought to honour the Father, is that which makes us Christians, and which nothing else will so do.

This honour of the person of Christ may be considered in the duties of it, wherein it doth consist; and in the principle, life, or spring, of those duties.

The duties whereby we ascribe and express divine honour unto Christ, may be reduced unto two heads. 1st. Adoration. 2dly. Invocation.

Adoration is the prostration of soul before him as God, in the acknowledgment of his divine excellencies and the ascription of them unto him. It is expressed in the Old Tes

tament by minnwn, that is, humbly to bow down ourselves or our souls unto God. The LXX render it constantly by TT POOKUVÉW; which is the word used in the New Testament unto the same purpose. The Latins expressed it usually by adoro. And those words, though of other derivations, are of the same signification with that in the Hebrew; and they do all of them include some external sign of inward reverence, or a readiness thereunto. Hence is that expression, • He bowed down his head and worshipped ;' see Psal. xcv. 6. And these external signs are of two sorts. (1st.) Such as are natural and occasional. (2dly.) Such as are solemn, stated or instituted.

(1st.) Of the first sortare the lifting up of our eyes and hands towards heaven upon our thoughts of him; and sometimes the casting down of our whole persons before him, which deep thoughts with reverence will produce. Outward instituted signs of this internal adoration are all the ordinances of evangelical worship. In and by them do we solemnly profess and express our inward veneration of him. Other ways may be invented to the same purpose, but the Scripture knows them not, yea, condemns them. . Such are the veneration and adoration of the pretended images of him, and of the host, as they call it, among the Papists.

This adoration is due continually to the person of Christ, and that as in the exercise of the office of mediation. It is due unto him from the whole rational creation of God. So is it given in charge unto the angels above. For when he brought the first-begotten in the world, he said, "POOKUVIoátwoav aŭrų navreç ãyyeloi Okoīthat is, 'mbx sa sunnun ' worship him all ye gods ;' Psal. xcvii. 7. • Let all the angels of God worship him,' adore him, bow down before him; Heb. i. 6. See our exposition of that place; the design of the whole chapter being to express the divine honour that is due unto the person of Christ, with the grounds thereof. This is the command given also unto the church, `He is thy Lord, and worship thou him ;' Psal. xlv. 11.

A glorious representation hereof, whether in the church above, or in that militant here on the earth, is given us, Rev. v. 6–14. ‘And I beheld, and, lo, in the midst of the throne, and of the four beasts, and in the midst of the elders, stood a Lamb as it had been slain, having seven horns and seven eyes, which are the seven spirits of God sent forth into all the earth. And he came and took the book out of the right hand of him that sat upon the throne. And when he had taken the book, the four beasts and fourand-twenty elders fell down before the Lamb, having every one of them harps, and golden vials full of odours, which are the prayers of saints. And they sung a new song, saying, Thou art worthy to take the book, and to open the seals thereof; for thou wast slain, and hast redeemed us to God by thy blood, out of every kindred, and tongue, and people, and nation; and hast made us unto our God kings and priests : and we shall reign on the earth. And I beheld, and I heard the voice of many angels round about the throne, and the beasts, and the elders : and the number of them was ten thousand times ten thousand, and thousands of thousands; saying with a loud voice, worthy is the Lamb that was slain, to receive power, and riches, and wisdom, and strength, and honour, and glory, and blessing. And every creature which is in heaven, and on the earth, and under the earth, and such as are in the sea, and all that are in them, heard I saying, blessing, and honour, and glory, and power, be unto him that sitteth upon the throne, and unto the Lamb for ever and ever. And the same four beasts said, Amen. And the four-and-twenty elders fell down and worshipped him that liveth for ever and ever.'

The especial object of divine adoration, the motives unto it, and the nature of it, or what it consisteth in, are here de clared.

[lst.] The object of it is Christ, not separately, but distinctly from the Father, and jointly with him. And he is proposed, lst. As having fulfilled the work of his mediation in his incarnation and oblation; as a Lamb slain. 2dly. In his glorious exaltation,' in the midst of the throne of God.' The principal thing that the heathen of old observed concerning Christian religion, was, that in it, ' praises were sung to Christ as unto God.'

[2dly.] The motives unto this adoration are the unspeakable benefits which we receive by his mediation; · Thou art worthy, for thou wast slain, and hast redeemed us unto God,'&c.

Hereon the same glory, the same honour, is ascribed unto

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